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GENEALOGY 

97A.70E 

NAEIBB 




Robert A. Van Wyck, 



THE 



AUG 7IISS 



Brown Book 



^ Biographical Record 
of Public Officials of 
The City of New York 
for 1898-9 . . . . 



^izNLALOGiCAu SOCltTY 
OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 
OF LATTSS.I).^V SAIHTS 

presented to 3198(1 

C^ ZAiL 



DATE fbliCROFICHEO 

FEB 2 3 2003 







153 2 



BY 



J. EARL ARRINGTON 
HOLLIS. L. I., N. Y. 



Published by 




MARTIN B. BROWN COMPANY, 
New York, 



. 899 . ’^'withdrawn 



From Vns Family 
History Library 



Copyright, 1899, 

BY 

-Martin B. Brown Company. 



INTRODUCTION. 



Apart from a brief description of the scope and functions of 
the Departments connected with the City Government, which has 
a natural place in a volume of this nature, this book will not in 
any sense tell of what has gone before in making this municipality 
the second greatest city in the world. 

The past is on record. There is so much to chronicle that is 
important and timely in the present and future of the Greater 
City that repeating in another form what has already been pub- 
lished would be a useless work. 

Never since the dawn of the City of New York have its offi- 
cials been confronted with such grave problems and great possi- 
bilities. The reason of this is obvious. 

To carry out the provisions of the present Charter, which is 
not denied was framed by men of high capacity and rare authority 
on municipal affairs, but which, nevertheless, was subject to much 
study and necessitated many radical changes and innovations, 
was a problem involving complications and difficulties which had 
not been met before. In spite of this, however, it can safely be 
said that the first year of the consolidated City Government under 
the present executive and administrative heads has been a dis- 
tinct success. 

To begin with, the present City officials are men of capacity 
and ability, whose previous business, law and official careers have 
been such that they were entitled to a trial of the increased 
responsibilities which the duties of the Greater City demanded. 

That they have been true to their trust is evideiiL Tom the 
’ ■ idorsement and approval the Administration has received on all 
ides and from all factions for the year which has just passed, 
'he deportment of every Department of the City Government has 



4 



warranted this indorsement. The work of administration h, 
been conducted on business principles with the view of attainin 
the highest efficiency. 

The changes in the City Government, caused by the resigns 
tions of Nathan Straus and John F. Carroll and the deaths Ci 
Augustus W. Peters, John Purcell, John Delmar and Daniel 
Ryan, have lost to the City a number of trained and valuable 
officials whose places it has not been easy to fill. The above 
named left their public af¥airs in such shape, however, that it was 
only necessary to appoint fit men in touch with the purpose of 
the administration and familiar with the established order of 
things to carry on the work demanded. This has been done. 

The public has a right to know who its officials are. The 
officials in turn have the same right to be known as they are. 
In view of the fact that there has not heretofore been a publica- 
tion in permanent form which contained faithful biographies of 
the officials of New York, the publishers of The Brown Book 
have issued this volume in the hope that it will fulfill that pur- 
pose. 





f 



I 



Contents. 



FRONTISPIECE — Mayor Robert A. Van Wyck. 

INTRODUCTION 

THE CITY OF NEW YORK— 

Provisions of the Charter 

MAYOR’S OFFICE— 

Robert A. Van Wyck, Alfred M. Downes, Richard S. 
Farley, Ross F. Keogh, David J. Roche, George W. 
Brown, Jr 

COMMISSIONERS OF ACCOUNTS— 

Edward Owen, John C. Hertle, John E. Ellison 

BOARD OF ARMORY COMMISSIONERS 

' MUNICIPAL ASSEMBLY— 

j Members of the Council 

! Randolph Guggenheimer 

j John T. Oakley, P. J. Scully, Nicholas J. Hayes 

I Members of the Board of Aldermen 

' Thomas F. Woods, William H. Gledhill, Robert 

j Muh, Michael F. Blake 

. PRESIDENTS OF THE BOROUGHS— 
i Augustus W. Peters (Died Dec. 29th, 1898), Edward M. 
Grout, Louis F. Haffen, George Cromwell, Frfderick 
Bowley, Ira E. Rider, Joseph P. Hennessy, James W. 
i Stevenson 

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE- 

BIRD S. COLER, Michael T. Daly, Edgar J. Levey, 
Edward Gilon, David O'Brien, David E. Austen, 
John J. McDonough, William McKinny, Walter H. 
Holt, John J. Fetherston, George Brand, Frederick 
w. Bleckwenn, John T. Gouldsbury, William F. 
Baker, Patrick Keenan, John H. Timmerman 

ijBOARD OF PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS— 

.• ^ilurice F. Holahan, John H. Mooney 

' Department of Highways : 

7 ^ jiMES P. Keating, Henry P. Morrison, John P. 
^ M/Dden, Thomas R. Farreli 

I 



PAGE 

3-4 

9-13 

14-20 

21-27 

28-29 

30 

36t38 

40-42 

33 

43-46 

47-57 

58-77 

78-83 

84-88 



vi CONTENTS. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS {Continued)— page 

Department of Sewers — James Kane, Matthew F. Dono- 
hue, William Brennan, Matthew J. Goldner 88-92 

Depart me7it of Street Cleaning — James McCari'ney, F. M. 

Gibson, Patrick H. Quinn 92-9U 

Department of Bridges — JOHN L. Shea, Thomas H. York 96-98 
Department of Public Buildings — S. Kearny, 

Peter J. Dooling 98-99 

Department of Water Supply — William Dalton, Thomas 
J. Mulligan, James Moffett, George W. Birdsall, 

W. G. Byrne, Joseph Fitch 100-105 

LAW DEPARTMENT— 

John Whalen, Theodore Connoly, Charles Blandy, 

Almet F. Jenks, William W. Ladd, Jr., John P. Dunn. . 106-1 1 1 
DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES— 

John W. Keller, Thomas S. Brennan, A. Simis, Jr., 

James Feeny, Charles A. Aldfn, Arthur A. Quinn, 

J. McKee Borden 112-117 

FIRE DEPARTMENT— 

John J. Scannell, Hugh Bonner, James H. Tully, 

Augustus T. Docharty 118-123 

DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS— 

Thomas J. Brady, Alfred J. Johnson, Daniel Campbell 124-12S 
DEPARTMENT OF PARKS— 

George C. Clausen, George V. Brower, August Moebus, 

Willis Holly, Clinton H. Smith, Robert T. Brown, 

John DeWolf 129-1 38 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION— 

Charles Bulkley Hubbell, Parker P. Simmons, 

A. Emerson Palmer, C. B. J. Snyder, Hubbard R. 

Yetman, Franklin C. Vitt '39-148 

DEPARTMENT OF TAXES AND ASSESSMENTS— 

Thomas L. Feitner, Edward C. Sheehy, Arthur C. 

Sal.mon, Thomas j. Patterson, William F. Grell 149-156 

DEPARTMENT OF DOCKS AND FERRIES— 

J. Sergeant Cram, Peter F. Meyer, Charles F. Murphy, 

William H. Burke 157-160 

AQUEDUCT COMMISSION— 

Maurice J. Power, William H. Ten Eyck, John P. 

WiNDOLPH, Alphonse Fteley, Harry W. Walker ,-61-166 

DEPARTiMENT OF HEALTH— 

Col. Michael C. Murphy, Gen. Emmons Clark, LV. 

William T. Jenkins, Dr. John B. Cosby 167-17I5 ! 



CONTENTS. 



vii 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S OFFICE— page 

Col. Asa Bird Gardiner, John F. McIntyre, Stephen 
S. Blake, James D. McClelland, William J. McKenna, 

James J. Walsh, Thomas F. Byrne, Charles E. Le 
I Barrier, Robertson Honey, Gerald Hull Gray, 

I Robert Townsend, John F. Cowan, James Lindsay Gor- , 

I DON, James W. Osborne, Charles E. F. McCann, Henry 
W. Unger, Forbes J. Hennessy, Valentine Carleton, 

Moses Herrman, Albert E. Bryan, Edward T. Flynn, 



John J. Connell, James J. Grady, Daniel O’Reilly 177-197 

BOARD OF CITY RECORD— 

William A. Butler, Solon Berrick, Thomas C. 
Cowell, Washington H. Hettler 198-202 

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION— 

Francis J. Lantry, N. O. Fanning, James J. Kirwin, 

Arthur Phillips 203-207 

CHANGE OF GRADE DAMAGE COMMISSION— 

Gen. James M. Varnu.m, Daniel Lord, William E. 

Stillings 208-210 

, BUREAU OF MUNICIPAL STATISTICS— 

Dr. John T. Nagle 211-214 

I BOARD OF ASSESSORS— 

' Edward McCue, Edward Cahill, Thomas A. Wilson, 

Maj. Patrick M. Haverty, William H. Jasper 215-220 



POLICE DEPARTMENT— 

Bernard J. York, John B. Sexton, Henry E. Abell, 

Jacob Hess, Col. William H. Kipp, William S. Devery 221-227 

MUNICIPAL CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION— 

Charles H. Knox, William N. Dykman, Robert E. 



Deyo, Lee Phillips 228-232 

NEW EAST RIVER BRIDGE COMMISSION— 

Lewis Nixon, Julian D. Fairchild, James W. Boyle, 

Smith E. Lane, Thomas S. Moore, John W. Weber — 233-240 



EXAMINING BOARD OF PLUMBERS— 

John Renehan, Edward Haley, James E. McGovern. . 241-244 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR— 

' William M. Hoes. William B. Davenport 245-246 

I COUNTY CLERKS OFFICE— 

I William SoHMER, George H. Fahrbach 247-249 

i SHERIFF’S OFFICE— 



. Tho.masJ.Dunn, Henry P.Mulvany, Patrick H. Pickett 250-253 
I COMMISSIONER OF JURORS— 

Charles Welde, H. W. Gray 



254-255 



CONTENTS. 



viii 



REGISTER’S OFFICE— page 

Isaac Fromme 256-257 



JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT— 

Abraham R. Lawrence, Charles H. Truax, Charles 
F. MacLean, Frederick Smvth, Joseph F. Daly, Miles 
Beach, Roger A. Pryor, Leonard A. Geigerich, Henry 
W. Bookstaver, Henry R. Beekman, Henry A. Gilder- 



sleeve, Francis M. Scott, Henry Bischoff, Jr., John J. 
Friedman, William N. Cohen, P. Henry Dugro, 

David McAdam 258-264 

SUPREME COURT, APPELLATE DIVISION— 

Morgan J. O’Brien, George C. Barrett, William Rum- ’ 

SEY, Chester B. McLaughlin, George L. Ingraham, 
Charles H. Van Brunt, Edward Patterson 264-267 



COURT OF GENERAL SESSIONS— 

Rufus B. Cowing, James Fitzgerald, Joseph E. New- 
EURGER, Martin T. McMahon, J. W. Goff, E. R. Carroll 268-269 
COURT OF SPECIAL SESSIONS— 

Elizur B. Hinsdale, William T. Jerome, Ephraim A. 



Jacob, John Hayes, William C. Holbrook 270-274 

JUDGES OF THE CITY COURT— 

John H. McCarthy, Edward F. O’Dwyer, John P. 

Schuchman, W. M. K. Olcott, Thomas F. Smith 275-278 

SURROGATES’ COURT— 

John H. V. Arnold, Frank T. Fitzgerald 279-280 

JUDGES OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT— 



Joseph H. Stiner, Hermann Bolte, George F. Roesch, 
Wauhope Lynn, William F. Moore, James A. O’Gorman, 

Henry M. Goldfogle, Daniel F. Martin, J. B. McKean 281-286 
CITY MAGISTRATES— 

Clarence W. Meade, John O. Mott, Joseph M. Deuel, 

Robert C. Cornell, Leroy B. Crane, Charlfis A. 
Flammer, Henry A. Brann, Willard H. Olmstead, 

Thomas F. Wentworth, Herman C. Kudlich, Charles 



E. Simms, Joseph Pool 287-295 

CORONERS— 

Antonio Zucca, Jacob E. Bausch, John Seaver 294-296 

MISCELLANEOUS— 



Mutiicipal Art Commission — William H. Maxwell, Hor- 
ace Loomis, Thomas J. Byrne, Francis J. Worcester. 
Charles V. Adee, Edward J. Cornell, P. J. Andrev, s, 

Joseph P. Fallon. Association City Hall Reporters— 

George C. Trantor, William Hannah 297-306 

PUBLIC-SPIRITED CITIZENS— 

Richard Croker, Nathan Straus, John F. Carroll . 307-3U 



THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



Provisioxs of tfie Cfiarter. 

The City of New York under the present Charter now' em-' 
braces the territory comprising the former City of New York, 
on Manhattan Island, the annexed territory in Westchester 
County, the former City of P>rooklyn, in Kings County, the 
entire County of Richmond, known as Staten Island, and the 
portion of Queens County included in Long Island City, the 
Towns of Newtown, Jamaica and Flushing, and nearly one-half 
of the Town of Hempstead, L. I. 

The above territory is divided into five boroughs, as follows : 
The Borough of IManhattan, including Manhattan Island, and 
the adjacent smaller islands; Borough of The Bronx, comprising 
that part of the former City of New York in Westchester County, 
also north of the Harlem river and Spuyten Duyvil Creek and 
the islands adjacent; Borough of Brooklyn, comprising the 
whole of Kings County; Borough of Queens, including Long 
Island City, Newtown. Jamaica, Flushing and part of Hemp- 
stead, L. L; Borough of Richmond, which comprises the whole 
of Staten Island. 

The powers of government formerly administered by these 
localities separately are now merged into one, with the IMayor 
and the Corporation of the City as the head. Legislative power 
is vested by the Municipal Assembly, composed of two houses. 
The Council of t centy-nine members, to hold office for four 
vears, and the Board of Aldermen, of sixty members, to hold 
office for two years. The President of the Council is elected by 
the entire citv, but the other members are chosen from the Coun- 
cil Districts where they reside. There are ten of these districts; 
New York Citv contains five; Brooklyn, three; Richmond, one, 
and Queens, one. Each district in New York City and Brooklyn 
is represented by three Councilmen, and there are tw^o members 
from Richmond and two from Queens, making altogether, w'ith 
the President of the Council, the requisite twenty-nine members. 

Each member of the Board of Aldermen represents an 
Assembly District. Each ex-Mayor is cx-ofHcio entitled to a seat 



lO 



in the Council, with a right to participate in its discussions; and 
each administrative head of a department to a seat in the Board 
of Aldermen, with a like privilege, but no cx-officio member is 
entitled to vote in either body. 

The Councilmen and Aldermen make up the Municipal As- 
sembly, to which ' is granted large powers. It has legislative 
anthorit}', not only over all the usual subjects of municipal juris- 
diction but, with a view of self development, is included power 
to establish ferries; to build bridges over and tunnels under all 
waters within its domain; to build docks and improve the harbor 
of the entire city; to construct parks, school-houses and public 
buildings; to open streets and e.xtend them; to provide water, and 
also the means of securing cheap and rapid communication 
liy ferry and railroad from one part of the city to another. Every 
act of the Municipal Assembly shall, before it takes effect, be 
presented, duly certified, to the iMayor for his approval. The 
Mayor shall return such act to the House in which it orginated 
within ten days after receiving it, or at the next meeting of the 
house after the expiration of said ten days, e.xcept in special 
legislation, in which case the Mayor shall return said act to the 
house in which it originated within ten days after the abstract 
of its provisions or a reference thereto shall have been published 
in the City Record, or at the next meeting of the house after the 
exj^iration of said ten days. If he approve it he shall sign it. 

If he disapprove it he shall specify his objections, in writing. If 
it is not returned with such disapproval within the time specified 
it shall take effect as if he had approved it. 

In the granting of franchises the concurrent action of the 
Board of Estimate and Apportionment is recpiired. Eranchises 
for streets, avenues, parkways or highways cannot be granted 
for a longer period than twenty-five years, subject to renewal on 
new terms. The approval of the Board of Estimate must be 
secured Itefore the Municipal Assembly acts, and its action must 
be bv a three-fourths vote. If the iMayor vetoes such grant, a 
five-sixtlis vote is required to pass the act. The prior approval 
of the Board of Estimate is required before any loan can be 
created or bond issued by the ^Municipal Assembly. The Munic- 
ipal Assemblv is also given power to construct, establish and 
maintain additional water-works and to acquire property within 
and beyond the limits of the city for this purpose. 

The IMunicipal Assembly is authorized to consider the tax . 
budget as prepared by the Board of Estimate, and also has the 



1 1 

power to reduce the amounts fixed, but not to increase them. 
J’ower to pass all necessary ordinances is devolved upon the 
Aiunicipal Assembly, and all ordinances in force at the beginning 
of the year remain in force until repealed or amended. 

It is the duty of the members of the ^Municipal Assembly to 
see that the laws and ordinances are faithfully observed by all 
the departments, and they have power, by joint resolution, to 
inquire at any time into the working of any department and 
whether the duties of ariy city official are being faithfully per- 
formed. I'he Municipal Assembly also authorizes contracts to 
be made by the heads of departments for all work or supplies 
involving an expenditure of more than $1,000, unless otherwise 
ordered by a three-fourths vote. 

The executive and administrative powers of the City Govern- 
ment arc vested in the Mayor and heads of the Departments. 
With the single exception of the Comptroller, who is elected at 
the same time and for a like term as the iXIayor, the latter ap- 
points the heads of the City Departments. The following are 
the Departments of the City; 

Executive Department — Mayor’s Office. 

IMunicipal Assembly — The Council and Board of Aldermen, 

Department of Finance. 

City Chamberlain. 

Law Department — Corporation Counsel. 

Police Department. 

Board of Public Improvements, in which are represented the 
Department of Water Supply, Department of High- 
ways, Department of Street Cleaning, Department of 
Sewers, Department of Public Buildings, Lighting and 
Supplies, and the Department of Bridges. 

Department of Puldic Charities. 

Department of Correction. 

Fire Department. 

Department of Parks. 

Department of Docks and Ferries. 

Department of Taxes and Assessments. 

Department of Education. 

Department of Health. 

Department of Buildings. 

Tn addition to the above there are many important city com- 
missions. bureaus and offices the functions of which are entirely 



12 



separate and distinct from any of the preceding departments, 
d'lie following is the list of commissions and bureaus: 

Aqueduct Commissioners. 

Commissioners of Accounts. 

Board of Armory Commissioners. 

^Municipal Civil Service Commission. 

Bureau of IMunicipal Statistics. 

Board of Estimate and Apportionment. 

Board of Assessors. 

Commissioners of the Sinking Fund. 

Bureau of the City Record. 

East River Bridge Commission. 

Change of Grade Damage Commission (Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth Wards). 

Examining Board of Plumbers. 

Art Commission. 

Rapid Transit Commission. 

Inspectors and Sealers of Weights and Measures. 

The governments of the counties included in the Boroughs of 
Manhattan, Brooklyn, Richmond and Queens are as follows : 

County Clerk. 

District Attorney. 

Commissioner of Jurors. 

Special Commissioner of Jurors. 

Register. 

Sheriff. 

Coroner. 

Public Administrator, and the 

Surrogate. 

The following is the list of courts, city, county and State, 
located in the Greater New York: Surrogates’ Court; Supreme 
Court; Court of General Sessions: Appellate Division, Supreme 
Court; Criminal Division, Supreme Court; City Court; Court of 
Special Sessions; IMunicipal Courts, and City Magistrates’ 
Courts. 

In addition to the above each of the boroughs has a President 
elected by the people at large. The functions of these offices are 
primarily for the purposes of local improvements in every section 
of the city. The President, by virtue of his office, is the presid- 



13 

ing officer of a local board for each Senate District in his bor- 
ough, composed of each member of the Municipal Assembly 
who is a resident of such local improvement district by virtue 
’ of his office and during his term as such member. Removal 
! from the district shall vacate their offices as members of said 
I local board. The members of a local board shall serve as such 

members without compensation. 

The City, as it inherits all the powers, franchises, rights and 
properties of the consolidated corporations, assumes all the valid 
debts of every locality. This provides for a uniform rate of taxa- 
tion throughout the entire City " e.xcept that all assessments for 
benefits heretofore laid or provided to be laid for the payment of 
any portion of such debts or to reimburse any of the said munici- 
pal and public corporations which created such debt in respect 
thereof, shall be preserved and enforced.” 

The key-note of the system provided by the new Charter for 
the administrative department of the City is based upon the fact 
i that wdien the w'ork is principally discretionary a Board has been 

! created to investigate and carry out the work. Where the work 

i is largely executive a single Commissioner has been provided. 

J Included in the former is the Police Department, with which are 

' also combined the duties of Election Commissioners. In this 

Department a bi-partisan board of four is provided for, composed 
of equal representation from the two leading parties. .-\,s an ex- 
j ample of a single-headed Commission may be cited the Fire 
j Department and the Department of Correction, both of wdiich 
Departments are principally executive, as stated above. 



THE MAYOR. 



The executive power of the City of New York is vested in 
the Mayor and the officers of the Departments. The Mayor is 
tlie chief executive officer of the City and will hold his office for 
the term of four years, commencing at noon on the first day of 
January after his election. He is ineligible for the next term after 
the termination of his office. The salary of the office is $15,000 
a year. The Mayor appoints the heads of all departments except 
that of the Finance Department. 

Section 95 of The Charter . — At any time within six months 
after the commencement of his term of ofi'ice the mayor, elected 
for a full term, may, whenever in his judgment the public interests 
shall so require, remove from office any public officer holding 
office by appointment from the mayor, except members of the 
board of education and school boards, and except also judicial 
officers, for whose removal other provision is made by the con- 
stitution. After the e.xpiration of said period of six months any 
such public officer may be removed by the mayor for cause upon 
charges preferred and after opportunity to be heard, subject, 
however, before such removal shall take effect to the approval 
of the governor expressed in writing. 

Section 1 15 of I'he Charter . — It shall be the duty of the mayor: 

1. To communicate to the municipal assembly, at least once 
in each year, a general statement of the finances, government, 
and improvements of the city. 

2. To recommend to the municipal assembly all such meas- 
ures as he shall deem expedient. 

3. To keep himself informed of the doings of the several de- 
partments. 

4. To be vigilant and active in causing the ordinances of the 
city, and laws of the state to be executed and enforced, and for 
that purpose he may call together for consultation and co-opera- 
tion any or all of the heads of departments. 

5. And generally to perform all such duties as may be pre- 
scribed for him by this act, the city ordinances and the laws of 
the state. 

Section 122 of The Charter . — The mayor may be removed 
from office by the governor in the same manner as sheriffs, ex- 
cept that the governor may direct the inquiry provided by law to 
be conducted by the attorney-general; and after the charges have 



15 



been received by the governor he may, pending the investigation, 
suspend the mayor for a period not exceeding thirty days. 

The Mayor also appoints such clerks and subordinates as he 
may require to aid him in the discharge of his official duties. 
Every three months he must report to the Municipal Assembly 
the expenses and receipts of his office. He has the power to veto 
all ordinances and resolutions of the Municipal Assembly, but if 
he does not disapprove they become laws after a lapse of ten days. 
An ordinance or resolution can be passed over the Mayor’s veto 
by a two-thirds vote of all the members of the Municipal Assem- 
bly, except when such ordinance or resolution involves an ex- 
penditure of money, the creation of a debt, or the laying of an 
assessment, or the grant of a franchise, a five-sixths vote is 
required. 

All warrants drawn by the Comptroller upon the Chamberlain 
for payments on behalf of the Corporation must be countersigned 
by the Mayor. He must also sign all bonds together with the 
Comptroller. In the absence of the Mayor, or in case of sick- 
ness, the President of the Council, is the Acting Mayor. 



ROBERT A. VAN WYCK. 

Robert A. \'an Wyck, the first Mayor of New York — under 
the consolidation act known as Charter of th.e City of New York 
— is a man of whose mental make-up there can be but little 
speculation. Students of human nature will not have to puzzle 
long over his character, for every line — by which a man is 
judged above his shoulders — in him shows courage, capacity and 
ability — qualities inherited and developed — inherited from the 
fine old Dutch stock from which he comes — developed in a 
splendid judicial career which fits him well for the high position 
he now fills. 

Mr. Van WTxk was born in the old Van Wyck mansion on 
Lexington avenue in the year 1850. His father. William Van 
Wyck, was a well-known New York lawyer and a descendant of 
Cornelius Barents ^^an Wyck. 

At twelve years of age young \’'an Wyck left school and five 
years later studied law. At twenty-two he was graduated from 
Columbia Law School at the head of a class of 124. His first 
affiliation with a political organization was with Tammany Hall, 
and from the moment of his connection with it he was energetic, 
loval and intensely interested in every movement to win for it 



j6 



power and prestige. In 1879, with a number of others, he with- 
drew from the organization on a question of policy, and during 
all his subsequent career he was a bold, open tighter, and in his 
public speeches always refrained from indulging in abuse or per- 
sonalities of any kind. In 1889 he returned to the organization 
of his first love and has been ever since one of its most inde- 
fatigable workers and wisest counsellors. In the above vear 
he was elected Judge of the City Court, which position he re- 
signed to become first Mayor of Greater New York! 

Such are the brief, bare facts connected with the career of 
iMayor Van Wyck, and although enough has been told which 
throws a strong side-light on his character, a more intimate 
glance at the man from the human standpoint will give a better 
estimate of him than any cut and dried chronicle could possibly 
do. 

His record so far, as Chief Magistrate of the city, has won 
praise from his friends and silenced his enemies. In the dis- 
charge of his duties friendship or political association does not 
relieve any subordinate from a strict adherence to all laws and 
ordinances. If the head of a department does not devote his 
time to the business of the office, the Mayor does not hesitate 
to reprimand or discharge the offender, no matter how intimate 
they may be in their personal relations or how strongly fortified 
the defendant may be by political influence. 

A man who knows men wisely and iMayor Van Wyck 
well enough tc judge, has summed him up as a man to whom 
material success means nothing unless deserved. Absolutely 
independent when he feels that he is in the right and hard to 
swerve when his ideas are once fixed, but willing to listen at all 
times to the other side and to yield if proven to be wrong. A 
man who does not “ wear his heart upon his sleeve,” but never- 
theless of a sympathetic nature, devoid of emotionalism. In- 
tuitive, but rarely acting upon his intuitions, unless verified by 
reason, his career as the chief executive of the city up to the 
present writing gives us every assurance that the part he will 
plav in the administration of the city’s affairs for the next four 
years will be a wise, conservative and consistent one. 




Richard S. Farley, 

Chief Clerk, Mayor's Office. 
David J. Roche, 

Chief, Bureau of Licenses. 



Ross F. Keogh, 

Bond and Warrant Clerk, Mayor's Office. 
George W. Brown, Jr., 

Deputy Chief , Bureau o/ Licenses, 



i8 



T 



Private Secretary 
to 

Mayor Van Wyck. 



Alfred M. Downes was born in New^ Haven, Conn., about 
thirty-five years ago. He graduated from Yale Law- .School and 
was admitted to the bar. About ten years ago he came to New- 
York and engaged in newspaper work. For more than nine 
years he was one of the bright political writers on the New' York 
Times. Lately he was political editor of the Morning Telegraph. 
When Mayor Van V'yck was looking around for a trusty, wide- 
awake man for secretar}- he selected Mr. Dowmes. Few' young 
men in politics have been so successful, few' are so popular, few 
have so many friends. This is easily accounted for in his case 
for he possesses not only tact and patience, but is a good judge 
of human nature as well. All men are the same to Mr. Dow'nes 
w'hen they have business w'ith the Mayor. Apart from his official 
duties there are few pleasanter people to meet. 

Success has not turned his head and he is still a reporter in 
spirit — one of the kind who takes an interest in w'hat his fellow' 
men are doing and who has a good word for all w'ho w'alk his 
way. 

RICHARD S. FARLEY. 

Rtch.vrd S. Farley, Chief Clerk of the Mayor’s office, w'as 
born in this city in the year 1868. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools and at St. Francis Xavier’s College. 

After his graduation from the latter institution, Mr. Farley 
entered Columbia College, where he finished his tuition in the 
Post-Graduate and Law Departments, and w'as finally admitted 
to the Bar in 1890. 

After the latter event, Mr. Farley began the practice of law' 
as a member of the firm of Farley, Lydon & Carroll, but sub- 
sequently withdrew to become a member of the firm of Delany, 




19 



Murphy & Farley, at No. 27 William street, with which firm he 
continued up to the time of his appointment by iSIayor \'an Wyck 
as Chief Clerk. 

Mr. Farley is a member of the family of that name which is 
well known all over the upper West side of the Borough of INIan- 
hattan, through the reputation acquired by his father, the late 
Terence Farley, who was an extensive builder and developer of 
\\Tst Side property. 

Mr. Farley is well known in social and literary circles, and for 
the last two years has been the Supreme Knight for the State of 
New York of the Knights of Columbus, in which organization 
he has achieved considerable renown because of his qualities as 
a finished orator. He is a member of many clubs, among them 
being the Democratic and University Athletic. 

ROSS F. KEOGH. 

Ross F. Keogh, the Bond and Warrant Clerk of }^Iavor \"an 
Wyck, was born in this city on October 27, 1866. He received 
his early education in the parochial and public schools of the city, 
and finished his studies at the Brick Church High School, Lack- 
awanna, Pa. Subsequently Mr. Keogh took up the study of law, 
but he soon abandoned this to enter commercial life. He was for 
many years assistant buyer in the eastern office of the Hunting- 
ton-Hopkins Company, the pioneer hardware house of the Pacific 
Coast, of which Collis P. Huntington, the railway magnate, was 
the head. When the house dissolved some years ago because of 
the desire of jMr. Huntington and his partners to devote their 
time to their railway and other enterprises, Mr. Keogh began 
his newspaper career, and was on the reportorial staff of several 
of the leading city dailies. 

About four years ago Mr. Keogh joined the staff of the local 
office of the Associated Press, and soon after was assigned to 
act as its representative at the State Courts in the City Hall and 
County Court-house. 

While there he became more closely identified with the Tam- 
many Hall Organization, and, in the campaign of 1896 he man- 
aged the canvass of its candidate in the Thirty-first Assembly 
District. Since then he has resided in the Twenty-third Assembly 
District, where he has been prominently identified with the dis- 
trict organization. 

Mr. Keogh was one of Mayor Van Wyck’s special appoint- 
ments. During his career as a reporter he and the IMayor, then 



20 



Judge Van W'yck, often met. Mr. Keogh’s accuracy in report- 
ing court news, coupled with his courtesy and tact, were not for- 
gotten by the incoming Mayor, who, having a personal knowl- 
edge of Mr. Keogh’s past work, gave him the position he now 
fills, to which his abilities entitle him. 

DAVID J. ROCHE. 

David, J. Roche, Chief of the Bureau of Licenses, was bom 
in New York City on February 13, 1861. He received his early 
education at Public School No. iS and High School No. 35. 
After graduating he devoted four years to the trade of horse- 
shoeing, in his father’s shop that had been established since 1865. 
While thus employed he was elected to the Board of Aldermen 
in 1889, 1890 and 1891, and each year was returned with in- 
creased majority, showing his popularity conclusively. 

He is a staunch Tammany Democrat, member of the Demo- 
cratic Club, Treasurer of the IMohegan Club, and is also a mem- 
ber of several other social and benevolent organizations. 

Jn addition to the above organizations Mr. Roche has been 
very active in advancing the interest of his craft. He has been 
President of Local Association of Horseshoers for two years, 
and by his exertions he has succeeded in securing favorable 
legislative enactments for the benefit of the association. 

His efforts in the above cause were so well directed and 
successful that during the last election he was given much im- 
portant work to do in connection with the campaign. Here 
again he was equally successful and demonstrated thoroughly 
that he was in every way capable of filling his present position. 

GEORGE W. BROWN, Jr. 

George W. Brown, Jr., Deputy Chief of the Bureau of 
Licenses, was born and brought up in the City of New York. 
He was graduated from Princeton in the famous “ Class of ’77,” 
afterward from the Law School of Columbia, under Professor 
Dwight, and then admitted to the Bar here in 1880. Three 
years later he received his appointment from Mayor Edson, and 
has been retained in office successively by Mayors Grace, Hewitt, 
Grant, Gilroy, Strong and Van Wyck. He is an active member 
of the Bar Association, Democratic Club, Tammany Hall, and 
other organizations. He is also a prominent Freemason, having 
held high offices with honor to himself and credit to the craft. 



THE COMMISSIONERS OF ACCOUNTS. 



The Commissioners of Accounts, in addition to being the 
INIayor’s confidential officers and accountants, make special 
inspections for the Mayor, during the progress of the work, of 
contracts of every description awarded by the different depart- 
ments of the City, and they report directly to him any violation 
of the specifications. 

In gross cases of violations, where the same are not remedied, 
they at once notify the Comptroller to withhold payment until 
the specifications are complied with, and the Commissioners of 
Accounts stand ready to defend their action in court. In every 
case where litigation has followed they have been sustained in the 
courts as far as the Court of Appeals. 

For the purpose of making these inspections they have a 
complete chemical and physical laboratory, in charge of an 
expert chemist, who has been engaged by the present Commis- 
sioners. 

This chemist’s duty will be to determine the quantitative and 
qualitative analysis of asphalts, cements, stone, sand, and all 
other materials used in the construction of roads, pavements and 
other public improvements. ' 

The above laboratory is under the supervision of a Chief 
Engineer, who has also under him a staff of engineers, draftsmen 
and surveyors, and, in addition, he has a staff of inspectors, who 
are constantly engaged in making examinations of contract work 
in course of construction in the different boroughs. These 
inspectors make daily reports to the Chief Engineer, who in turn 
reports to the Commissioners of Accounts, any well-founded 
causes of complaint. 

There are employed throughout the year examiners whose 
sole duty is to examine the receipts and expenditures of the 
Einance Department of the City, which includes the Chamber- 
lain’s and Comptroller’s offices, and the Commissioners of Ac- 
counts make a quarterly and annual report to the Mayor and 
Common Council containing a detailed and classified statement 
of the financial condition of the city as shown by such examina- 
tion, as required by the Charter. 



22 



Every voucher and cancelled warrant for which any payment 
has been made by the City of New York, including all the bor- 
oughs, is thoroughly examined by this office as to clerical cor- 
rectness, but the legality of the expenditure and the correctness 
of the prices paid are made the objects of special examinations of 
the respective departments. 

The Commissioners of Accounts have the power to subpoena 
any City Officer or any citizen who has business relations with 
the City Government, and can examine his books and accounts, 
if necessary. 

While the Comptroller has the general supervision of the 
manner of keeping the books of the different departments, still, 
the Commissioners of Accounts can criticise and recommend 
such improvements as they, in the course of their examination^, 
find necessary, and in some of the departments the law specifies 
that the books shall be kept in the form approved by the Com- 
missioners of Accounts. 

The present Commissioners, John C. Hertle and Edward 
Owen, have been extremely active, and besides reporting to the 
Mayor innumerable numbers of violations of specifications bv 
contractors, have, among many others, made examinations and 
reported on the following subjects ; 

The revision of the final estimates for the Board of Estimate 
and Apportionment: a statement of all bonds authorized and 
unissued from 1882 up to the present time, and also showing the 
unexpended balances of the several accounts for which the monev 
realized from these bonds was used; a detailed examination and 
report of the expenditures of the East River Bridge; a complete 
report of the expenditures of the Rapid Transit Commission; 
an examination made by them of the New York Society for the 
Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled, in which they showed that 
this institution was overpaid by the Comptroller’s Office many 
thousand dollars; the manner of receipting for forage and coal 
delivered to the Fire Department; an examination and recom- 
mendation of improvements in selling ferry tickets and keeping 
accounts of the Clerk in charge of those matters for the Depart- 
ment of Charities; an examination of the Health Board for the 
sale of laboratory products, such as diphtheria anti-toxins and 
vaccine virus; the accounts of the Penitentiary, which show'cd 
that $30,052.87 had not been collected from the State for main- 
tenance of felons committed for terms of less than a year, since 
1875; the accounts and records of the several Clerks of the 



23 



^Magistrates’ Courts, showing a deficit of $131 ; a report to the 
jMayor recommending a system of keeping books for the City 
Record, a statement showing the unexpended balance of tlic 
School-house Fund Account of the Department of Education ; 
the records of the several Clerks of the Magistrates’ Courts and 
the Wardens of the respective prisons attached thereto, showing 
a deficit of $1,263.50; Clerk and Warden’s Account of Special 
.Sessions; the accounts of the Clerk of the Court of General Ses- 
sions; an examination of the Mission of the Immaculate Virgin, 
showing the net amount of over-payment by the Comptroller to 
this Mission of $16,292.85; the accounts of the Clerk of the City 
Court from January 26, 1892, to March 31, 1898; an examination 
of the thirteen Civil District Courts for the year 1897; an exam- 
ination of the Bureau of Licenses from January i, 1895, to April 
30, 1898; the failure of the Magistrates of the City of New York 
for the past twenty-two years to commit vagrants as tramps, 
thereby depriving the City of the opportunity to charge the State 
for the support of tramps, as a result of wdiich this failure has 
been remedied. The Commissioners of Accounts furnish the 
forms and check the monthly trial balances rendered by the dif- 
ferent departments to the Mayor. 

It will thus be seen that the Commissioners of Accounts have 
large powers, great authority and much discretion for the pur- 
pose of carrying on their work. Of course they could abuse 
their privileges and neglect their duties, but the history of the 
office is a clean one. 



EDWARD OWEN, 

COMMISSIONER OF ACCOUNTS. 

Edward Owen, Commissioner of Accounts, was born in 
Cincinnati, O. He attended the public schools of that city, fin- 
ishing his education in Ken} on College, Gambler, Ohio. 

Mr. Owen’s business career began in New Orleans, where, 
before he reached his majority, he was filling an important posi- 
tion in the office of a cotton house in that city, later becoming a 
partner in the concern. 

When the Civil War broke out Mr. Owen was one of the 
early Volunteers, and distinguished himself on more than one 
occasion for bravery and service. As a member of the famous 
Battalion of Washington Artillery of New' Orleans, he was pro- 
moted from private to Orderly Sergeant, and at the first battle 



24 



of Bull Run was further promoted to a first lieutenancy of the 
First Company. 

Mr. Owen was severely wounded twice, but nevertheless 
“ stuck it out,” remaining in the war until the surrender of 
Appomattox, when he returned to Louisiana and resumed his 
former business, in partnership with General James Longstreet. 
During the “ carpet bag ” reign in New Orleans, Mr. Owen 
removed to New York and became a member of the Cotton Ex- 
change. In 1885 he was appointed to a clerkship in the office 
of Commissioner of Accounts, and shortly after was advanced 
to Chief Clerk of the office. 

In 1893, Mayor Gilroy made him Commissioner of Accounts, 
and during his administration he conducted the affairs of the 
office on such a strict business basis, combined with a fine 
system of detail, that it was often referred to by business men as 
one of the model city departments. 

When Mayor Strong assumed office he received so many 
letters from prominent citizens concerning Mr. Owen’s capabil- 
ities that, although the policy of his administration would not 
admit of a re-appointment, they requested him to remain as 
Chief Clerk. When Mayor Van Wyck made his appointments 
he knew the City would be in safe hands with Air. Owen again 
as Commissioner of Accounts. 

Apart from business Mr. Owen is a quiet gentleman, with a 
flavor of Southern chivalry in his bearing and manner that makes 
him esteemed and respected by all who know him. He is a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Southern Society, 
Lieutenant Commander and Paymaster of the Confederate Vet- 
eran Camp of New York. In both of these associations, as 
well as with the general public, he stands high as a man, a citi- 
zen and a public official. 




^j ohn.c.her tle 



JOHN.E. 



JOHN C. HERTLE, 



COM.MISSIOXER OF ACCOUNTS. 

John C. Hertle was born in New York City, of German 
parents. 

After leaving school he entered one of the best business col- 
leges at that time to accpiire a thorough commercial education, 
which he mastered so rapidly that his fellow-students came to 
him for assistance, which attracted the attention of the president 
of the college, who offered him a position as teacher, during 
which time he labored studiously, acquiring the higher branches 
and finally was induced to accept the position of principal, which 
he held for five years, when he accepted the position of account- 
ant for a manufacturing corporation. 

This position he held until he started a manufacturing bus- 
iness for himself and succeeded in establishing a prosperous 
business, employing over 250 hands, which he was compelled to 
sell, owing to ill health. 

Regaining his health he accepted the position of accountant 
for a large silk manufacturing company, having their salesroom 
in New' York City. 

He managed the affairs of the counting-room so well that he 
was finally made superintendent and confidential man, which 
position he held for ten years, when Mayor Van Wyck selected 
him as a Commissioner of Accounts. 

In politics he has always voted the Democratic ticket and for 
several years has been and is now a member of the Democratic 
Club, and Society of Tammany or Columbian Order. 

Mr. Hertle has a way of grasping a large subject directly and 
quickly, and this, added to his long experience as an expert ac- 
countant, peculiarly qualifies him for the important position he 
now' fills. 



JOHN E. ELLISON, 

CHIEF CLERK, COMMISSIONERS OF ACCOUNTS. 

John PI. Ellison was born in New' York City, of American 
parents, whose ancestors were Scotch-Irish. 

His father, Samuel Ellison, having died before the subject of 
this sketch had attained the age of eleven years, he being the 
eldest of a family of five children, was obliged to leave school and 
become a breadwinner for the family. 



He advanced rapidly in tlie public schools of this city, being 
near the first class in old Eighty-seventh Street School, of which 
Dr. John W. Boyce was the principal. 

He at once commenced the serious duties of life and entered 
the law office of one of the old school practitioners of the city, a 
descendant, by the way, of one of the original committee of one 
hundred which was formed in revolutionary times for the pro- 
tection of the lives and property of the city. 

While in the above employ Mr. Ellison developed a taste for 
good literature, and embraced every opportunity to improve his 
mind. His employers took a deep interest in his welfare, plac- 
ing many advantages in his way of acquiring an education. In 
this connection he gained a knowledge of Latin and history that 
youths in his position do not usually possess when away from 
school-house precincts. 

He entered Columbia College Law School, and, devoting his 
spare time and evenings to the study of law, succeeded in gradu- 
ating in the class of 1878, having acquired a good and substantial 
knowledge of the law, both theoretically and practically. 

’ He has been engaged in many important cases, involving 
I complicated questions in real estate law and the law of trusts. 

I In politics he has always voted the Democratic ticket, and is 
, now the President of the Manhasset Club, a large and flourishing 
* club, the representative Tammany organization of the Annexed 
! District, which rendered valuable aid in the last campaign. 

His abilities hav’e been fully recognized by the bench and bar. 
and he has many testimonials as to his ability and standing. 



BOARD OF ARMORY COMMISSIONERS. 

The Armory Board of the City of New York was first created 
by chapter 91 of the Laws of 1S84, and was composed of The 
Mayor, Hon. Franklin Edson; the Major-General Commanding 
the First Division of the National Guard, Gen. Alexander Shaler; 
the Commissioner of Public Works, Hubert O. Thompson. 

The Board was reconstructed by chapter 487 of the Laws of 
1886, as follows: The Mayor, Hon. Wm. R. Grace; the two 

senior ranking officers in command of troops of the National 
Guard in the City and County of New York, Brig.-Gen. W. G. 
Ward, Brig.-Gen. L. Fitzgerald; the President of the Depart- 
ment of Taxes and Assessments, Hon. Michael Coleman; the 
Commissioner of Public WYrks, Rollin ]\I. Squire. 

The Charter of the greater city does not provide for any Com- 
missioner of Public Works, nor does it provide any substitute for 
him in the Armory Board, so that the Board, since January i, 
has consisted of only four members. 

The personnel at this time is: Hon. Robert A. Van Wyck, 
President, the IMayor; Brig.-Gen. }vIcCoskry Butt, Brig.-Gen. 
George Moore Smith, the two senior ranking officers in com- 
mand of troops of the National Guard in the City and County of 
New York; Hon. Thomas L. Feitner, Secretary, President of 
the Department of Taxes and Assessments. 

The Mayor has always been chairman of the Board, and since 
the reconstruction in 1886, the President of the Department of 
Taxes and Assessments has been the secretary. 

The object of the creation of the Armory Board was to pro- 
vide the National Guard of the City and County of New York 
with new and suitable armories, and the Board was empowered 
to purchase sites and erect buildings of a suitable character, as 
well as to alter, repair, enlarge or rent armories and to supply 
the same with furniture, to appropriate money to pay for the 
same, money to come from the sale of bonds, and all to be done 
only with the concurrence of the Sinking Fund. 

Prior to the formation of this Board the city had given the 
site for the Seventh Regiment Armory, and that organization 
had erected the building now thus occupied. 

In 1884 the following sites were selected and purchased: 



29 



For the Twenty-second Regiment — The block bounded by 
Sixty-seventh and Sixty-eighth streets, Columbus avenue and 
the Boulevard. 

For the Twelfth Regiment— An L-shaped plot on the west- 
erly side of Columbus avenue, between Sixty-first and Sixty- 
second streets. 

For the Eighth Regiment — The block between Park and 
Madison avenues, and Ninety-fourth and Ninety-fifth streets. 

Contracts were also entered into for a building for the Twelfth 
Regiment, designed by Architect James E. ^Yare. 

In 1888 contracts were let for the erection of an Armory, de- 
signed by Architect John R. Thomas, for the Eighth Regiment, 
on 300 feet of the easterly end of the plot purchased for that 
purpose. 

In 1889, the armory building, designed by Architect John P. 
Leo, for the Twenty-second Regiment, was contracted for. 

In 1890 the plot on the easterly side of Park avenue, between 
Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth streets, was secured for the 
Seventy-first Regiment Armory, and in 1892 a building designed 
by Architect John R. Thomas was contracted for, to accommo- 
date the Seventy-first Regiment and the Second Battery. 

In 1891 a site was secured for the Ninth Regiment on the 
north side of Fourteenth street, running through to Fifteenth 
street, a short distance west of Sixth avenue, and in 1894 a 
building designed by W. A. Cable and E. A. Sargent, Associate 
Architects, was erected thereon. 

In 1893 the Government loaned the ship “ New Hampshire ” 
for an armory for the First Naval Battalion, and the Armory 
Board fitted up the same as suitable quarters for that organiza- 
tion. 

In 1894 a building designed by J. R. Thomas, Architect, was 
erected adjoining the Eighth Regiment Armory, as quarters for 
Squadron “ A.” 

In 1894 a modern rifle range was constructed in the Seventh 
Regiment Armor}*, and in 1898, the building was wired and 
furnished with fixtures for lighting the same by electricity. 

Preliminary steps have been taken for securing sites for the 
First Battery of Artillery, and for the Sixty-ninth Regiment. 

The expenditures made under this Board since its creation 
have amounted to about four million dollars. 



30 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

1898, 1899, 1900 and 1901. 



BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN. 



Council 

Dist. 


NAME 


RESIDENCE 


BUSINESS ADDRESS 




R-VNDOLPH Guggenheimer, 
President. 


8 East Si St Street 


30 Broad Street. 


f 

1 ■! 


John T. Oakley, ... . . . 

Vice-Chairman. 
Thomas F. Foley 


442 East 14th Street 

20 James Slip 


413 East 14th Street. 

113 Centre Street. 

50 Centre Market. 


[ 


Martin Engel 


303 Broome St .... 


1 


Fr.ank J. Goodwin 


363 West 24th Street. . . . 


280 Broadway. 




Charles F. Allen 


153 West 43th Street ... 


1.33 West 45th Street. 




Patrick J. Kvder 


1.34 Spring Street 

437 East 84th Street... 


7 Vandam Street. 




Harry C Hart 


78 Park Row. 




George B. Christman 


331 East 55th Street ... 


313-318 East 93th Street. 


) 


John J. Murphy 


393 First Avenue 


393 First Avenne. 


( 


Eugene A. Wise 


301 West 138th Street . . 


145th Street and 8th Ave. 


4 


Stewart M. Brice 


693 Fifth Avenue 


80 Broadway. 

2478 Second Avenue. 


( 


Herman Sulzer 


2478 Second Avenue 



BOROUGH OF THE BRONX. 





William J. Hyland 


Westchester 


320 Broadway. 
271 Broadwav. 


5 


Adolph C. Hottesroth. . . 


668 East 134th Street... 


/ 


Bernard C. Murray 


1263 Boston Road 


1263 Boston Road, 



BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN. 



8 



Charles H. Francisco 

F'TiAvnfl "F Wn r.TAM«. 


1192 Halsey Street 

25 Orient Avenue 


CoyRAD H. Hester .. 


183 Central Avenue 


Adam H Leich ... . 


314 Monroe Street . 

78 Bradford Street 


Hevrt French 


Charles H Ebbets 


H2H First Street 


Jr»wv J Alprii'Rnv .... 


176 Xpvins Sfrppt 


William A. Doyle 

Martin F. Conly 


261 58th Street 

92 Adams Street .... 





1193 Halsey St., Brooklyn. 

) Maspeth and Gardiner 
I Avenues, Brooklyn. 

183 Central Ave., Brooklyn. 
300 Montague St., Brooklyn. 
78 Bradford St.. Brooklyn. 
Eastern Park, Brooklyn. 
(Franklin Building, 

1 183 Kenisen St., Brooklyn. 
193 Montague St., Brooklyn. 
93 Adams Street, Brooklyn. 



BOROUGH OF QUEENS. 



Q ' 


David L. Van Nostrand.. 


Little Neck 


Little Neck, L. I. 




Joseph C.vssidy 


99 Hulst St., BiiSBville.. 


99 Hulst St., Blissville, L. I. 



BOROUGH OF RICHMOND. 



in I 


Joseph F. O’Grady., 


New Brighton 


New Brighton, S. I. 


10 ] 


Ben.iamin j. Bodine 


Port Richmond 


Port Richmond, S. I. 



P. J. Scully, Cltrk. 



L 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COUNCIL 



For Ihe Years 1898, 1899, 1900 and 1901. 



Finance. 

Councilman ALLEX, 

“ BRICE, 

CHRISTMAN, 

HESTER, 

FRENCH. 

OGRAUV, 

LEIGH. 

I Law. 

; Councilman HOTTENROTH, 

GOODWIN, 

i VAN NOSTRAND. 

! BODINE,- 

EBBETS, 
McGARRY, 
WILLIAMS. 

Eailroads. 

Councilman OAKLEY, 

“ HART. 

HYLAND, 

CONLY, 

HESTER. 

CASSIDY, 

FRANCISCO. 



Street Cleaning. 

Councilman HYLAND, 

FOLEY, 

MURPHY, 

CONLY, 

VAN NOSTRAND. 



Salaries and Offices. 

Councilman BRICE. 

OAKLEY. 

HOTTENROTH, 

EBBETS, 

•• LEICH. 

Fire. 

I Councilman O’GRADY, 

I “ SULZER, 

I * MURPHY, 

i •• HESTER, 

“ FRANCISCO. 



Building Department. 

Councilman DOYLE, 

" ALLEN. 

McGARRY, 

•• VAN NOSTRAND, 

WISE. 

Markets. 

Councilman FOLEY, 

“ GOODWIN, 

FRENCH, 

VAN NOSTRAND, 
WILLIAMS. 

Privileges and Elections. 

Councilman EBBETS, 
GOODWIN, 

BRICE, 

“ DOYLE, 

’■ WILLIAMS. 

Claims. 

Councilman MURRAY, 
SULZER. 

“ CASSIDY, 

HESTER, 

LEICH. 

Streets and Hightvays. 

Councilman MURPHY, 
SULZER, 

“ ENGEL, 

" MURRAY, 

FRENCH. 
FR.ANCISCO, 

“ VAN NOSTRAND. 



Public Buildings, Lighting 
and Snj)plies. 

Councilman CHRISTMAN, 
BRICE. 

ALLEN, 

DOYLE. 

“ ENGEL, 

“ BODINE, 

WILLIAMS. 



32 



Docks and Ferries, 

> Cou^fCIL5IA^• RYDER, 

WISE, 

“ HOTTEMROTII, 

“ McGARRY, 

HESTER, 
CASSIDY, 

LEICII. 

JRules. 

Councilman OAKLEY, 

“ GOODWIN, 

“ BODINE. 

VAN NOSTRAND, 
“ IlOTTENROTH, 

HESTER, 

" WILLIAMS. 

Fublic Education . 

Councilman BRICE, 

“ HART, 

HYLAND, 

“ O'GRADY, 

" WILLIAMS. 

Public Health. 

Councilman WISE, 

GOODWIN, 

" FRENCH, 

VAN NOSTRAND, 
“ FRANCISCO. 

Penal Institutions. 

Councilman HESTER, 

CHRISTMAN, 

MURRAY, 

“ CASSIDY, 

“ LEICH. 

Public Charities. 

Councilman HART, 

“ ALLEN, 

“ SULZER, 

'■ McGARRY, 

“ BODINE. 



I Police. 

Councilman ENGEL, 

“ RYDER, 

HART, 

“ FRENCH, 

WILLIAMS. 

Parks. 

Councilman SI7LZER, 
RYDER, 

“ HAXAND, 

MURPHY, 
EBBETS, 

“ WILLIAMS, 

“ BODINE. 



Sewers. 

Councilman GOODWIN, 
“ FOLEY, 

WISE, 
MURRAY, 
HESTER, 
LEICH, 
O’GR.ADY. 



Bridges and Tunnels. 

Councilman CONLY, 

CHRISTMAN, 

BRICE, 

'■ HYLAND, 

FRENCH, 

“ CASSIDY, 

LEICH. 

Water Supplg. 

Councilman FOLEY, 

“ HART, 

WISE, 

“ HOTTENROTH, 

DOYLE, 

“ O'GRADY, 

“ WILLIAMS. 



JOINT COMMITTEES. 



Printed and Engrossed 
Ordinances and Resolutions. 

Councilman McGARRY. 

“ HOTTENROTH 

" BRICE, 

“ BODINE, 

“ FRANCISCO. 



Public Printing. 

Councilman RYDER, 

“ O’GRADY 

“ CONLY, : 

“ MURRAY, 

LEICH. 



33 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 

1898 AND 1899. 



Dist. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


BUSINESS ADDRESS. 


No. 




New York Co. 


101 East32d St. 
543 W. 34th St. 


11 


William H. Gledhill, V. P. 


359 West 34th St 


1 


Jeremiah Is E.NNEFiCK .. 


57 Dey St 


57 Dey St. 








2 New Chambers St. 
128 West Houston St. 
122 Nassau St. 

Pier 43 North River. 














5 


Joseph A. Flisn 


37 Grove St 








199 Centre St. 

838 Greenwich St. 




Patrick H. Keahos 


136 Bank St 








315-347 Grand St. 
.307 West 26th St. 
179 East 96th St. 
34 Jackson St. 

334 West 42d St. 
200 First Av. 








10 
















14 


James P. Hart 


200 First A V 








513 W 47th St. 


16 






191 Stanton St. 
786 Ninth Av. 














^9 






220 Broadway. 
1760 Broadwav. 


John- S. Poddy 


251 West noth St 


22 


Michael Ledwith 


162 East 46th St 


3d Av. and 46th St. 


23 


CoLLiK H. Woodward 


473 West 145th St 


306 West 145th St. 


24 


Frank Dunn 


317 East 60th St 




23 


P. Tecdmseh Sherman. . .. 


126 East 27th St 


59 W'all St. 


26 


Fd. T. McEneaney . 


419 East 75th St 


419 East 75th St 


27 


Joseph Oatman 


714 Seventh Av 


l.a56 Broadway. 


28 


John T. McCall 


2.30 East 81st St 


Herald Building. 


29 


Homer Folks 


53 East 87th St 


105 East 22d St. 


30 


George A. Burrell 


163 East 90th St 


2 Lispenard St. 


31 


Elias Goodman 


05 East 127th St 


468 Sixth Av. 


32 


William F. Schneider, Jr. 


130 East 105th St 


H. B. Claflin Co. 


33 


Thomas F. McCaul 


1625 Madison Av 


127 East 108th St. 


34 


La-k-rence W. McGrath.... 


4.58 Willis Av 


458 Willis Av. 


:35 


TTenrs- Geiger 


P’36 Clover St 


1 19 3 Boston Road. 
1 West Chester. 


Annexed District. 

' Frank Gass |west Chester 


1 


John L. Burleigh 


Kings Co. 

Pierrepont House, B'klyn . . 


26 Court St. 


2 


James J. Bridges 


283 Front St., Brooklyn 


283 Front St., Brooklyn. 


3 


Moses J. M'afer 


124 Harrison St., Brooklyn. 


124 Harrison St., Brooklyn. 


4 


David S. Stewart 


407 Lafayette Av., B'klyn.. 


544 Franklin Av., B’klyn. 


5 


James F. Elliott 


86 South 9th St., Brooklyn. 


So. 6th St. & Kent Av. B'klyn. 


6 


John Diemer 


.33 Hopkins St., Brooklyn.. 


35 Hopkins St., Brooklyn. 




William Keegan 


99th St., near3d Av., B’klyn 


9 Court Square, Brooklyn. 
402 Union St., Brooklyn. 


8 


Francis P. Kenny 


i 402 tTnion St., Brooklyn ... 


9 


Frank Hennt,sst 


1514 Court St., Brooklyn 


544 Court St., Brooklyn. 


10 


Francis J . Byrne 


90 Clermont Av., Brooklyn 


90 Clermont Av., Brookljm. 


11 


Stephen W. McKee\"er 


133 Sixth Av., Brooklyn. . . 


95 Washington St., B’klyn. 
395 Court St., Brooklyn. 


12 


Matthew E. Dooley 


384 Sixth St., Brooklyn 


13 


Hector McXeil 


101 Diamond St., Brooklyn 


8 White St., New York. 


14 


Edward S. Scott 


181 North 4th St., B'klyn. . . 
179 Montrose Av.. B'klyn.. 


Foot So 5th St., Brooklyn. 


15 


Jacob J. Velton 


60 Broadway, Brooklyn. 


16 


William Wentz 


174 Bainbridge St., B’klyn. 


WestWashingt’nMkt., N.Y 




J.ACOB D. Ackerman 


17 Verona Place. Brooklyn. 


Pier 18, North River. 


18 


James H. McInnes 


1387 Pacific St., Brooklyn . 


45 East 12th St., New York. 


19 


Bernard Schmitt 


81 Evergreen Av.. Brooklyn 


81 Evergreen Av., Brooklyn 


20 


John T. Lang 


127 Central Av., Brooklyn. 


127 Central Av., Brooklyn.. 


21 


Elias Helgans 




337 Van Siclen Av., B’klyn 
1 Tottenville, Staten Islands 


John J. Vaughan, Jr 


Richmond Co. 
[Tottenville, Staten Island.. 




Queens Co. L. 1. City.— Newtown. 
1 Joseph Geiser |835 Albert St., L. I. City. .. 


j8:35 Albert St, L. 1. City, 




Jamaica.— Flushing.— Hempstead. 

1 William T. James |l20 Jamaica Av., Flushing.] 20 Main St., Flushing. 



3 



JIiCHAEL F. Blake, CterV. 



34 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

For the Years 1898 and 1899. 



Finance. 

Alderman MUH. 

HART, 

“ SIEFKE, 

“ SCOTT, 

BYRNE, 

“ GEISER. 

“ GOODMAN. 

La IV. 

Alderman BURRELL, 
ELINN, 

GLfCK, 

“ DOOLEY, 

“ VELTON, 

“ GAFFNEY, 

McINNES. 

Ilailroads, 

Alderman LEDWITH, 

“ FLECK, 

“ SMITH, 

“ KEEGAN, 

SCOTT, 
McCALL, 

“ GOOD .man. 

Farks. 

Alderman McGRATH. 

“ HARRINGTON, 

DUNN, 

“ McKEEVER, 

HENNESSY, 

“ VAUGH.tN, 

SHERMAN. 

Sewers. 

Alderman McCAUL, 
MINSKY, 
GEISER, 

“ RODDY, 

“ WAFER, 

WOODWARD, 

SCHNEIDER. 



Bridges and Tunnels. 

Alderman KEAHON, 

SCHNEIDER, 
“ NEUFELD, 
BYRNE, 
LANG, 

■ GEIGER, 

“ McNeill. 



IVater Sup2>hj. 

Alderman KENNEFICK, 

“ BURRELL, 

“ GASS, 

" ELLIOTT. 

“ SCHMIDT, 

“ VAUGHAN, 

JAMES. 

Streets and Jlifjhivays. 

Alderman ELLIOTT, 

RODDY, 

GEIGER, 

“ DUNN, 

“ BRIDGES, 

“ CRONIN, 

“ BURLEIGH 

I Public Buildings, LigJding 
' and Supplies. 

Alderman GLEDHILI., 

“ GAFFNEY, 

McENEANEY, 

“ BYRNE, 

“ HELGANS, 

“ GEISER, 

“ GOODMAN. 



Docks and Ferries. 

Alderman GAFFNEY, 
LEDWITH, 

“ FLINN, 

“ SCOTT. 

“ McKEEVER, 

“ CRONIN, 

STEWART. 

Rules. 

Alderman GLICK, 

“ WELLING, 

“ METZGER, 

BRIDGES, 
KENNEY, 
GEIGER. 
McINNES. 



Public Education. 

Alderman SCHNEIDER, 
HART, 

“ HENNESSY, 
“ OATMAN, 

“ VAUGHAN. 



35 



ruhlic Health. 

Alderman McKEEVER, 
METZGER, 

I “ BUNN, 

' " , MUH. 

FOLKS. 



Penal Institutions. 

Alderman VELTON, 
CRONIN, 
“ KOCH. 

“ McCALL, 
" BIEMER. 



Public Charities. 

Alderman VAUGHAN, 

“ SIEFKE, 

“ WELLING, 
WAFER, 

“ ACKERMAN. 



Privileges and Elections. 

Alderman GLEDHILL, 

KENNEFICK, 

KENNEY, 

“ GEISER, 

“ JAMES. 



Building Department. 

Alderman SIEFKE, 
GASS, 

“ HENNESSY', 

BURRELL, 

“ BURLEIGH. 

Police. 

Alderman SMITH, 

" KOCH, 

“ KEAHON, 

“ McKEEVER, 

“ STEWART. 



Street Cleaning. 

Alderman FLECK, 
GEIGER, 

“ BRIDGES, 

HARRINGTON, 
“ OKIE. 

Salaries and Offices. 

Alderman CRONIN, 
NEUFELD, 

“ HENNESSY', 

McGR.YTH, 

“ WENTZ. 

Fire. 

Alderman HART, 

“ KOCH, 

■ DOOLEY, 

McCAUL, 
DIEMER. 

Markets. 

Alderman METZGER, 

McENEANEY, 

MINSKY, 

ELLIOTT, 

“ ACKERMAN, 



Affairs of Boroughs, 



McCALL, 

CRONIN. 

SCHMITT, 

ELLIOTT. 

WOODWARD. 



Legislation. 

Alderaian GAFFNEY', 

“ MUH, 

GLICK, 

DUN-N. 

“ GLEDHILL, 

“ LANG, 

“ SMITH, 

BURLEIGH, 

WOODWARD 

GOODMAN. 



JOINT COMMITTEES. 

Printed and Engrossed 
Ordinances and Resolutions. 



Alderman GASS, 



“ KENNEFICK, 


KENNEY, 


“ SCHNEIDER, 


“ SHERMAN. 


Public Printing. 


Claims. 


' Alderman WELLING, 


Alderman FLINN, 


GLICK, 


“ Y-ELTON, 


! “ HELGANS, 


“ KOCH, 


1 “ G EAGAN, 


“ WENTZ, 


I “ MeINNES. 

j 


McGRATH. 


1 

L_ „ 





36 



RANDOLPH GUGGENHEIMER. 

Randolph Guggenheimer is a type of the class of Ameri- 
cans who illustrate the possibility for advancement and distinc- 
tion where energy, perserverance and integrity are the ruling 
incentives, and who, through honesty, industry and ability have 
pushed their way forward from comparative poverty to an honor- 
able position in business and professional life. Mr. Guggen- 
heimer is now in the very prime of life, having been born 
forty-nine years ago in Eynchburg, \"a., where his parents were 
extensively engaged in business. While still a youth he came 
to New York, and by his own efforts and with his own earnings 
supported himself until he graduated as a lawyer in the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York. By his ability and industry Mr. 
Guggenheimer soon carved out for himself a considerable prac- 
tice, and in 1882, when he was already known as a rising and 
prosperous lawyer, he established the well-known firm of Gug- 
genheimer & Untermyer, now Guggenheimer, Untermyer & 
Marshall. 

Mr. Guggenheimer, from the time he came to New York, 
took a deep interest in the welfare of the public schools, and 
this fact received recognition at the hands of Mayor Grace in 
1887, when he appointed Mr. Guggenheimer a Commissioner 
of the common schools, the only public office which he has ever 
held. During the nine years that he was connected with the 
public school system his activity made itself felt in every depart- 
ment of the Board. He won the esteem and confidence of the 
teachers by his uniform courtesy and fair treatment, and always 
upheld the rights of the local teachers to promotion to the highest 
offices open to them. When it appeared that the accommoda- 
tion in the public schools as they then existed was not sufficient 
for all the children of the city, Mr. Guggenheimer, at a critical 
moment, became Chairman of the Committee on Sites, and 
worked night and day to acquire suitable and convenient loca- 
tions for new school buildings, and it is but justice to him to say 
that a very large percentage of the new school-houses which 
have been erected during the last nine years are the fruits of his 
labors and sagacity. He urged forward, in spite of great opposi- 
tion, the plan of having a sufficient number of schools thrown 
open in the evening for the tuition of those who were unable to 
secure educational advantages during the day. 




RANDOLPH GUGGENHEI.MER, 

President of the Colixcil. 



The retention of the German language as an indispensable 
part of the school curriculum was due solely to his efforts, and 
was the result of a long and arduous fight on his part. 

Mr. Guggenheimer was the pioneer in introducing large office 
buildings on Broadway, between Houston and Fourteenth 
streets. He bought the site of the old New York Hotel and 
erected upon it the New York Commercial Buildings, a splendid 
structure, occupying the entire block, and the largest of its kind 
in the United States. Mr. Guggenheimer is an old and valued 
member of the Arion Society, and is also a member of the IMan- 
hattan, Lotus and several other clubs. 

He is thoroughly domestic in his tastes and has long been 
happily married, and has a family of two sons and one daughter. 
In politics Mr. Guggenheimer has always been a Democrat, never 
seeking any office, but always willing to help the cause and its 
candidates. He was elected President of the Municipal Council, 
because in him are found and recognized those qualities of man- 
hood and character that will guarantee to the citizens of Greater 
New York an official who will not only act in the best interests 
of the City, but who will bring into public life the same business 
capacity and honorable dealing that have been the cause of his 
success in private life. 

Mr. Guggenheimer’s course since he assumed the office of 
President of the Council not only confirms the above estimate 
of him. but also shows that a man of rare attainments is seldom, 
if ever, understood by a certain element of the public. To 
another element, however- — the high-minded and right thinking 
— he has demonstrated as surely and clearly as is possible to 
demonstrate in public life, that he is a strong, sincere, honest and 
unique character. 




John T. Oakley, 

Vice-President, The Cci 



P. J. SCL-LLV, 

City Clerk. 



N. J. Hayes, 

Deputy City Clerk. 



40 



JOHN T. OAKLEY. 

John T. Oakley, Vice-President of the Council, was born in 
New York City of Irish parents, thirty-five years ago. Educated 
in the grammar schools and New York College. After leaving 
school, assisted his father in business. Was appointed Index 
Clerk in the Register’s Office in 1885, where he remained two 
years, going thence to the Custom-house as Statistician for six 
months. He then became Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue 
in the Second District, where he remained until Benjamin Harri- 
son was elected President and the administration of the office 
changed. In March, 1890, after the necessary Civil Service 
examination, he was appointed Complaint and Corresponding 
Clerk in the Department of Street Cleaning, which position he 
held until he was nominated for Alderman in 1892 in the then 
Tenth Assembly District. He was elected by a plurality of over 
3,000; was made Chairman of the Law Committee and gave 
such satisfaction that he was renominated and re-elected in 1894. 
He became the leader of the Democratic minority and succeeded 
Hon. William M. K. Olcott as Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee and Commissioner of the Sinking Fund. 

In 1897 he was nominated and elected Councilman in the 
First District, and on January, 1898, when the Council organ- 
ized, he was elected Vice-Chairman. He has always been a 
Tammany Democrat, is a member of the Executive Committee 
of Tammany Hall and leader of that organization in the Four- 
teenth District. He is in the hotel business, is married and has 
three children. 



P. J. SCULLY. 

P. J. Scully, the City Clerk and Clerk of the Municipal 
Assembly, the first officer of the title in New York, appointed 
under the Charter of 1897, is a native of the City of New York. 
He was born in Christopher street on the 9th of January, 1855. 
The history of the man tells the story of how success is attainable 
in municipal politics by perseverance, industry, loyalty and hon- 
esty. 

Mr. Scully had his education at the old De La Salle Institute 
on Second street. New York City. He was a member of a circle 
devoted to literary pursuits and the study of parliamentary usage, 
most of whom attained eminence in the careers selected by them. 
To-day there are judges, lawyers, business and medical men who 



1 



41 



have achieved prominence through the same training. In those 
days the traits that developed into the successful leader in public 
life were marked in P. J. Scully. An interested listener, temper- 
ate in debate, calm in the expression of judgment and tactful in 
the disposition of adverse claimants, his opinion was always 
solicited and his decision usually confirmed by authority. At 
the end of his school life Mr. Scully engaged in business, yet 
devoting his leisure to the studies proposed by the clubs of which 
he was a member. His accuracy as an accountant merited his 
appointment as Teller in the United States Custom-house at 
New York. Among the young men who advanced in Mr. 
Scully’s set was the late Edward F. Reilly, whose public career 
rounded in his election as County Clerk of New York County. 
On that event Mr. Reilly sought the help of Mr. Scully to organ- 
ize the vast interests of the County Clerk’s Office, which, in New 
York County, is also the office of the Clerk of the Supreme 
Court. At the earnest request of influential friends, who believed 
in his capacity and were acquainted with the difficulties the new 
administration would encounter, Mr. Scully accepted the office 
of Deputy County Clerk, and was sworn in on January i, 18S9. 

Briefly the legal profession recognized the efficiency of the 
new service, the promptness and accuracy with which the com- 
plicated business was executed, and on the death of Mr. Reilly 
during his incumbency, in response to a general demand that the 
new system should continue, Mr. Scully was appointed County 
Clerk to fill the vacancy. On the election of Judge Giegerich 
to the office !Mr. Scully was continued as Deputy, and again 
reappointed by Henry D. Purroy, on his election in 1892. 

After the election of 1897, when the municipalities and town- 
ships were merged into the consolidated City of New York, the 
gigantic interests and powers conferred upon the Municipal 
Assembly were the subjects of discussion by able jurists. 

Public necessity demanded and private authority recognized 
the extreme occasion for capable, efficient and honest organiza- 
tion of the staff that should execute the business of this new 
legislative and administrative body, the Municipal Assembly. 
At the first meeting held in the new chambers of the Municipal 
Assembly at the City Hall on January 3, 1898, P. J. Scully was 
unanimously elected City Clerk and Clerk of the Municipal As- 
sembly. 

The selection was made on Mr. Scully’s record in the public 
service. Despite the entanglements of the new Charter, Mr. 



42 



Scully, with characteristic force, organized the system and per- 
sonnel of the office of the City Clerk so satisfactorily that it 
elicited the written commendation of political partisans and the 
favorable recognition of the press. 

NICHOLAS T. HAYES. 

Nicholas J. Hayes, the First Deputy City Clerk of the City 
of New York, was born in Troy, N. Y., in 1854. He came to 
New York in 1866 and entered the College of St. Francis Xavier. 
After a two years’ course there and a term at the Bryant & Strat- 
ton Business College, Mr. Hayes embarked in business with a 
well-known tea house. His application and energy early at- 
tracted the attention of ex-Mayor Edward Cooper, and when 
that gentleman assumed office in 1879 he took Mr. Hayes with 
him in a confidential capacity. When the Mayor’s term expired 
Mr. Hayes returned to the tea business and remained there until 
1886 when his activity in politics secured for him a clerkship in 
the Superior Court. He held this position until the consolida- 
tion of the courts in 1896, when he was transferred to the Su- 
preme Court, where he remained until appointed First Deputy 
City Clerk on January 3, 1898. 

Mr. Hayes is best known as “ Nick,” and by this name is 
hailed throughout the Assembly District in which he resides by 
young and old. His extreme popularity could receive no better 
test than in the contest for member of the Executive Committee 
of Tammany Hall, which occurred in January, 1896, when, not- 
withstanding the extremely inclement weather, fully nine hundred 
of his neighbors showed their friendship and regard for him by 
remaining in line for hours in order to get an opportunity to vote 
for him. The rescue of his district from the Republican column 
by a large majority proved the wisdom of this choice, and the 
untiring efiorts of Mr. Hayes to aid the members of his organiza- 
tion to secure employment have still further endeared him to 
them. 



43 



THOMAS F. WOODS, 

PRESIDENT OF TPIE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Thomas F. Woods was born in New 
York City in 1866. He was educated in the 
public schools. At an early age, however, 
he evinced such a fondness for horses that, 
although he was unable at the time to grat- 
ify his ambition to become a breeder of the 
animal, upon leaving school he determined 
upon his calling at once. 

Learning the trade of a horseshoer in all 
its scientific and practical branches, he rap- 
idly rose to the front in his craft, until he 
now possesses one of the finest establishments for the purpose 
in the city. 

His taste for a political career has permitted him of late years 
to take a prominent place in the affairs of the city. From the 
first he has been a Tammany Democrat, his quiet, manly, sincere 
qualities winning their way in the councils of his party and mak- 
ing of him a leader in his district — the Twentieth. 

Mr. Woods makes a pleasing and dignified figure as the first 
President of the Board of Aldermen for Greater New York, and 
although not previously a student of the conduct of legislative 
bodies, he has coached himself .thoroughly in the rules and 
methods of the Board, and is thoroughly alive and in touch with 
all its procedure and acts. 

WILLIAM H. GLEDHILL. 

William H. Gledhill, Vice-President 
of the Board of Aldermen, was born in Nev/ 
York City on May 9, 1858, and was educated 
at Grammar School No. 32, West Thirty- 
fifth street, in that city. 

Mr. Gledhill left Grammar School No. 
32 at the early age of fourteen, to enter the 
wall paper business with his father, in which 
capacity he has been engaged for the past 
twenty-five years. 

Mr. Gledhill was elected in 1895 to the 
Assembly, after one of the most spirited contests in New York 
County, by a plurality of 967 votes over hif Republican opponent. 





44 



He was re-elected to the Assembly in 1896 by an increased plu- 
rality. Of the measures introduced in the Assembly by Mr. 
Gledhill, which subsequently became laws, the best known is the 
“ Gledhill bill to protect empoyees in buildings in course of con- 
struction.” It is unquestioned that since the adoption of this bill 
the casualties to employees on buildings have materially de- 
creased. 

In the fall of 1897, the Democratic party tendered to Mr. 
Gledhill the nomination as Alderman for the Eleventh Assembly 
District. Mr. Gledhill was elected by a large majority, and sub- 
sequently was honored by the Board of Aldermen in the election 
to the office of Vice-President of that body. 

The firm of wdiich Mr. Gledhill is a member employs a large 
number of hands, and ahhough the concern employs hundreds, 
and has been established over seven years, its relations with its 
employees have always been friendly. Mr. Gledhill’s record 
shows that he does not believe in “ strikes,” and this is the 
principle he has carried all through his private and political career 
up to date. 

ROBERT MUH. 

Robert Muh, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee of the Board of Aldermen, was 
born in Leipsig, Germany, on the 25th day 
of February, 1851. He came to this coun- 
try with his parents in the fall of 1853. He 
attended public school until he was eleven 
years of age, when his father died. He then 
had to go to work to help support his 
mother, and in the course of time he was 
apprenticed to a manufacturer of jewelry 
cases at No. 45 Ann street. After being 
with him for about ten years Mr. Muh became a partner in 
the business, which was successful. In 1886 he retired from 
business and went into the real estate business, at which he 
was also successful. He was elected in 1892 to represent the 
Eighteenth District in the Board of Aldermen and in 1894 was 
again elected to represent the same district. Mr. Muh was 
elected again in 1897 to represent wdiat is now the Fifteenth Dis- 
trict under the reapportionment. During his term of office in 
the Board of Aldermen he had the honor of being on some very 
important committees, to all of which he gave such careful at- 




45 



tention that his present position as Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen, which carries with it also mem- 
bership in the Sinking Fund Commission, is an appreciation in 
part of his conscientious and painstaking services in every official 
capacity in which he has been connected. 

Personally, Mr. Muh is an agreeable gentleman — one of the 
kind who is always within hailing distance when his friends re- 
quire a service or a favor. This, coupled with his reputation as 
an honorable business man and a faithful city official, has made 
him a popular citizen and his close friends predict a fine career 
for him in the make-up of the city’s government of the future. 

MICHAEL F. BLAKE. 

Michael F. Blake, Clerk of the Board of Aldermen, was 
born in the Eighteenth Ward of the City of New York, on the 
ist day of August, 1857. He was educated in the public schools 
and Columbia College Law School, and studied law in the office 
of the late ex-Supreme Court Justice Abraham B. Tappen and 
Henry Parsons. Subsequently embarked in journalism, and was 
for many years a writer on the staff of the New York Herald. 
In 1889 he resigned from the Herald to accept the position of 
Deputy Clerk in the Board of Aldermen, where he served for 
some years under Captain Francis J. Twomey, the veteran Clerk 
of the Common Council. When Captain Twomey retired on 
account of age and increasing infirmities, Mr. Blake was elected 
Clerk of the Common Council, which position he held for some 
years. In January, 1898, Mr. Blake was reappointed to the old 
position of Clerk to the Board of Aldermen, which position he 
now holds. He is Vice-Chairman of the General Committee of 
Tammany Hall of the Eighteenth Assembly District, and Chair- 
man of the Law Committee of that district. He is a member of 
the Democratic, Press and Anawanda Clubs. He still resides 
in the district where he was born. Mr. Blake is a lawyer in 
excellent standing, and is looked upon as an authority on laws 
and ordinances relating to the City of New York. 

Personally Mr. Blake is an affable, broad-minded gentleman, 
possessing liberal views on all topics and a respect for the opin- 
ions and hobbies of others, which has made him a great favorite 
and secured to him a large circle of friends. Although he 
takes the most interest in the active work connected with his 
official position, he has a decided liking for literature, especially 



46 



works pertaining to the history of New York City. His books 
on this subject alone would make a small library in itself, and he 
is always happy when he can dig out some forgotten or over- 
looked fact pertaining to the early history of the city, and which 
may have a bearing on the present administration of municipal 
afifairs. 




i 



L _ 



PRESIDENTS OF THE BOROUGHS AND 
LOCAL BOARDS. 



Borough Presidents hold office for a term of four years. 
Their offices are located in the City or Borough Halls, and they 
are cx-officio members of the Local Boards for each of the dis- 
tricts of local improvements. They are also chairmen of these 
local boards, entitled to preside at the board meetings and to 
vote, but not to have the power of veto. 

These local boards give the neighborhood a voice by which 
it can speak in relation to matters of local concern, and especially 
as to what are technically known as local improvements — im- 
provements to be paid for by assessments for benefit. 

The Charter of Greater New York provides for a wide appli- 
cation of the democratic principle of home rule through the Bor- 
ough system. The work of administering all of the departments 
was subdivided, in order that it might be successfully prosecuted, 
into five Boroughs: Manhattan, The Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens 
and Richmond. These five Boroughs were subdivided into dis- 
tricts of local improvements, and the representatives of tho.se 
districts in the Municipal Assembly were made to constitute what 
is known as a Board of Local Improvements. The limits of 
these smaller districts are the same as those of the various Sena- 
torial Districts embraced within the boundaries of the greater 
city, so that each local board, when properly constituted, would 
be composed of three Aldermen, one Councilman, with the Presi- 
dent of the Borough. 

The powers of these boards are purely recommendatory, the 
right to incur indebtedness and to authorize the making of con- 
tracts being reserved to the Municipal Assembly. Nevertheless, 
recommendations from the various Boards of Local Improve- 
ments in the greater city have great weight in effecting legisla- 
tion for the particular localities which they represent. For 
instance, an improvement such as the paving or opening of a 
street, the laying of sewers, gas-mains, etc., in a particular local- 
ity being petitioned for, the local board is called together by the 
President of the Borough to meet not less than ten or more than 
fifteen days after the date of filing of such petition, and the prop- 



48 



erty-owners are notified, by means of the City Record, that such 
a meeting will be held and that such matters will be considered, 
and at such meeting the owners of the properties to be affected 
by the assessment levied for such improvements have an oppor- 
tunity of being heard for or against such petition, and their 
representatives in the board recommend that the prayer of the 
petitioners be granted or that it be denied. 

This affords the higher bodies of the municipal government 
an opportunity of obtaining an expression of local opinion on 
proposed public improvements, and the citizens of the city are 
afl'orded a greater opportunity than ever before to be heard on 
matters affecting their properties. It is very evident that in the 
case of nuisances, such as disorderly houses, violation of health 
ordinances, etc., that through the local boards such matters will 
receive greater attention than if such complaints were made and 
placed on file in the various departments, to be reached in their 
order. 

The President of the Borough, from the fact that he is a 
member of the Board of Public Improvements, has an oppor- 
tunity of following the course of any petition until the final steps 
are taken thereon. 



AUGUSTUS W. PETERS, 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOROUGH OF M.'VNHATTAN. 

Augustus W. Peters, who resigned the Chairmanship of the 
Consolidated Stock and Petroleum Exchange to become Presi- 
dent of the Borough of Manhattan, was born in St. Johns, N. B., 
in 1844, and lived there until he was twenty-three years of age. 

After attaining a good knowledge of the law he came to New 
York in 1867, and in the larger life of this city soon found oppor- 
tunities to display his natural business ability. Becoming a 
member of the Gold Exchange he rose rapidly. In 1876 he was 
elected Secretary of the Gold Exchange and held the position 
until it became a department of the Stock Exchange. 

In 1878 Mr. Peters became a member of the Mining Ex- 
change, and while running on an independent ticket he was 
elected Chairman of the Exchange, and since then at each annual 
election he has been unanimously re-elected. When the Mining 
Exchange was consolidated with the Petroleum Exchange and 
later both exchanges were merged into the Consolidated Stock 




• ■ r Brookly”- 






Louis K. Haufen, 
cs't Borough oj Bronx. 






Augustus \V. Peters,’ 
'fs't Poroigh Manhat., 



T 



50 



and I’etroleuni Exchange, Mr. Peters remained an intluential 
and popular member. 

Apart from business Mr. Peters is interested in military mat- 
ters and athletics. Pie is Sergeant-Major of the Old Guard Vet- 
eran Battalion of New York, a member of the New York Athletic 
Club and one of the active spirits in the Clover Bowling Club. 

Aside from athletics and the military, Mr. Peters is a poli- 
tician in the sense that politics with him means the welfare of the 
city first and always. He is a member of Tammany Hall and in 
January, this year, he was re-elected Chairman of the General 
Committee for the third time. 

Apart from business, athletics, the military and politics, Mr. 
Peters is a gentleman in every way fitted for his present position. 
Courteous, reposeful, of a picturesque appearance, and possessing 
the highest social qualities, he is altogether a man one likes to 
see in an important official position, a position which should only 
be filled by a man of dignity and character — such as he is. 

EDWARD M. GROUT. 

Edward M. Grout, President of the Borough of Brooklyn, 
has become, during the past three years, one of the most prom- 
inent men in the public life of that section of the Greater New 
York. His popularity is indicated by the vote by which he was 
elected to his present office, which was the largest given in Brook- 
lyn Borough to any city or county candidate. He is of New 
England ancestry, and was born in New York City in i86i. His 
paternal grandfather was Paul Grout, an old-time Democrat, who 
was an Assemblyman from New York City from 1839 to 1841. 

Mr. Grout’s early education was obtained in the public schools 
of New York and Brooklyn. He entered Colgate University, 
and was graduated from the class of 1884. He is now a trustee 
of Colgate University. 

Upon leaving college Mr. Grout studied law with General 
Stewart L. Woodford, now Minister to Spain, and was admitted 
to the Bar in 1885. He practiced with General Woodford’s firm 
until 1893, when his conduct of the celebrated Adamson tax- 
payer’s suit to prevent the surface railroad franchise frauds in 
Brooklyn attracted the attention of William J. Gaynor, and a 
partnership resulted on the first of January, 1893. During that 
year Mr. Grout took an active part in the litigation over the 
notorious Columbian Celebration bills, by which the city saved 



51 



$50,000; the New Utrecht gas scheme and the McKane prosecu- 
tion, which followed Judge Gaynor’s election to the bench of the 
Supreme Court. He led the Gaynor watchers at Gravesend on 
election day, and did much to bring to public attention the frauds 
there perpetrated. 

In the following year Mr. Grout took an active part in local 
politics and presided at the big Hill meeting at the Academy of 
Music. His action at that time made him prominent, and in 
1895 he became the regular Democratic candidate for Mayor. 
He began his campaign with an adverse majority of over 33,000, 
by which Mayor Schieren had beaten Mr. Boody at the preceding 
election, staring him in the face, but he made such a remarkable 
canvass that he was beaten by a plurality of only 2,000. In this 
campaign he was supported by the Citizens’ Committee of One 
Hundred. 

No important public movement has taken place in Brooklyn 
during recent years in which Mr. Grout has not taken an active 
part. He was an ardent advocate of the Greater New York, was 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Consolidation 
League, and made several arguments before the Legislature on 
that subject. He also appeared before committees of the Senate 
and Assembly a year ago in favor of the One Dollar Gas bill. 
His most earnest efforts, however, have been devoted to the sub- 
ject of municipal ownership of public franchises. He has de- 
livered numerous lectures on the question, and was largely re- 
sponsible for its introduction into the Democratic platform in 
the municipal campaign. 

Mr. Grout supported the Democratic ticket in the last na- 
tional campaign, and was one of the men put forward by the 
followers of Mr. Bryan as an acceptable candidate for Mayor. 

He is now the senior member of the law firm of Grout, Jenks, 
iMayer & Hyde, Assistant Corporation Counsel Jenks having 
been associated with him since January of last year. Socially he 
is very popular, being a member of the Manhattan, D. K. L., 
Brooklyn, Hamilton, Montauk and Riding and Driving clubs, 
and of the Democratic League. He is also a ^Yteran of the 
Twenty-third Regiment and Judge Advocate of the Second 
Brigade. He is interested in the Good Roads Association. 

genealogical society 

OF the church of JESUS CHRIST 
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

RUG 7 IP 



52 



LOUIS F. HAFFEN, 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOROUGH OF TPIE BRONX. 

Louis F. Haffen, President of the Borough of The Bronx, 
was born in New York City, November 6, 1854. After gradu- 
ating from St. John’s College, in Fordham, in 1875, he entered 
the School of Mines of Columbia College, and was graduated 
from there in 1879. 

Mr. Haffen, after two years’ service at home, made a practical 
study and investigation of mines and metallurgy in Colorado, 
New Mexico, Arizona and California. He returned to New 
York and engaged in the practice of his profession. After a 
short time he received an appointment on the engineering staff 
of the Park Department and subsequently was appointed Super- 
intendent of the New Parks in the Twenty-third and T\Venty- 
fourth Wards, now the Borough of The Bronx. In May, 1893, 
Mr. Haffen was appointed Commissioner of Street Improve- 
ments of the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards. He was 
elected in the fall of the same year as the Tammany candidate 
He had nearly 6,000 majority, receiving strong popular support, 
in consequence of his record during the short time he had filled 
the office previous to election. Mr. Haffen occupied the office 
of Commissioner of Street Improvements until its abolition under 
the Greater New York Charter. His work as such Commis- 
sioner is evidenced by the extraordinarily rapid development of 
the part of the city mentioned, due to public improvements. 
He was elected President of the Borough of The Bronx by a 
plurality of 9,390. His vote was 15,654, and of his two principal 
opponents 6,264 and 3,779. respectively. 

Mr. Haffen is devoted to his present office, and is heart and 
soul for any measure of value to his constituents. He is a mem- 
ber of all the prominent club; in the Borough of The Bronx. 



GEORGE CRO^IWELL. 

George Cromweel, President of the Borough of Richmond, 
was born in Brooklyn, July 3. i860. His father, the late Henry 
B. Cromwell was a well-known merchant and founder of the 
Cromwell Steamship Line, before the war, which did a large 
carrying trade with the West Indies, South America and nearly 
all the Southern ports. He was the first to adopt the screw as 







i 



a means of propulsion for ocean steamships in place of the old 
side wheels. He was as much ridiculed at the time for his adop- 
tion of the propeller as one would be now who proposed going 
back to the side-wheel again. 

Mr. Cromwell is a descendant of the Cromwell family famous 
in English history. On his mother’s side he is descended in a 
direct line from Elias Hicks, the famous Quaker preacher. 

Mr. Cromwell received his early education at the Juvenile 
High School and the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, from 
which, latter school he was graduated in 1878 as the salutatorian 
of his class. He entered Yale University in the class of 1883, 
graduating with honors, after the usual four years’ course, and 
receiving at the end of the Junior year the much-coveted honor 
of an election to the famous Senior Society known as “ Scroll 
and Keys,” to which but fifteen are chosen from each class. 

After graduation Mr. Cromwell spent a year in travel abroad, 
going as far east as Egypt and the Holy Land. Upon his re- 
turn to America he took the course at the Columbia Law 
School and was admitted to the Bar in the year 1886, when he 
entered the office of Elihu Root. 

In the fall of 1887 Mr. Cromwell was nominated by the Re- 
publicans of Richmond County for the Assembly and was elected 
by a majority of 1,229. This was probably the largest majority 
ever given a Republican in Richmond County. 

Mr. Cromwell at once took a prominent place in the Assem- 
bly and was placed upon four committees, among them being 
the Committees on Cities and Canals. He succeeded in having 
passed a large amount of needed legislation affecting Staten 
Island. Among the measures which he introduced and which 
became laws were the Arbor Day law, the bill to remove the old 
Government Cholera Burying Ground from Seguine’s Point, and 
provide for the selection of the present cemetery on Swinburne 
Island; the Eish and Oyster Protection bill and the bills amend- 
ing the village charters of Edgewater, New Brighton and Port 
Richmond. 

In the fall of 1888 Mr. Cromwell practically withdrew from 
active politics and devoted himself to the practice of law, con- 
necting himself with the well-known firm of Butler, Stillman & 
Hubbard, and making admiralty law his specialty. He held no 
public position until 1897, when Governor Black appointed him 
one of the Richmond County Park Commissioners. He was 
chosen President of the Board. 



54 



The question of the Presidency of the Borough of Ricluuoud 
having been finally settled, the people of Staten Island — Demo- 
crats and Republicans — are one family concerning the future 
improvement of the Island. Foremost among them is the Presi- 
dent of the Borough, who, with the co-operation of the leading 
citizens, is now advocating and working for, among other im- 
provements, an ocean driveway, connecting a country park sys- 
tem; a scientific system of drainage, increased lighting facilities, 
and a number of other features which will add to the attractive- 
ness and beauty of Richmond Borough. 

Mr. Cromwell's travels in and touch with the world at large 
has increased, if anything, his local pride, and with it an ambition 
to see Staten Island — which he thinks is not far away — the most 
beautiful suburb in the world. 



FREDERICK BOWLEY. 

Starting in life with no capital other than a robust constitu- 
tion and an absolute faith in himself, after twenty-four years of 
hard work, Frederick Bowlev, President of the Borough of 
Queens, is in possession of a competence. Mr. Bowlev attrib- 
utes his success to hard work. On his father’s side he is of 
German descent. On his mother’s side he is of Austrian ex- 
traction. His grandfather owned a large farm at Stuttgart, 
Germany. His father, Jacob F. Bowley, was born there, but 
after he became a young man he was exiled from the country 
because his political ideas were objectionable to the government. 
He came to America. 

The subject of this sketch was born in New York in 1853. 
He attended the public schools until he was twelve years of age. 
At that time he was bound out for five years to Luke Dempsey, 
who kept a meat store at the corner of One Hundred and Six- 
teenth street and First avenue. When his term of service expired 
he went west, and for the next two years worked in meat stores 
at different places in Illinois, Iowa, Michigan and Nebraska. 
Returning to New York he was employed for a time in several 
of the largest meat establishments in the city, his last position 
being that of general manager of the concern. But Mr. Bow- 
ley’s ambition had always been to manage a business of his own. 
In 1882 he opened a packing-house in New York. In 1887 he 
started a second establishment in Astoria, and for a time contin- 
ued both plants. Finding that his .Astoria business required all 



55 



Ills attention he gave up his New York house. The increase of 
population in the County of Queens was an incentive to INIr. 
Bowley’s enterprise, and he now controls three branches of his 
original plant in the Borough of Queens. 

Mr. Bowley’s entry into politics is of recent date. Two years 
ago, at the solicitation of his party associates, he became a candi- 
date for Alderman-at-Large from his district. His election to 
this office was an indorsement of the faith his business associates, 
acquaintances and the people-at-large had in him. As a member 
of the Common Council of Long Island City, while he did not 
proclaim himself a “ Reformer,” he, with three of his colleagues 
in the Board, Smith, Flanagan and Geiser, who were known as 
the “ honest four,” were instrumental in blocking the plans of 
the enemies who hoped by a vicious measure to saddle several 
millions of dollars of debt upon the city. i\Ir. Bowley’s enthu- 
siasm and courage at all times to fight for the people’s rights 
commanded universal respect and admiration, and his nomina- 
tion and election to the presidency of the Borough of Queens is 
evidence enough that he will give a good account of himself in 
his new position. 

Mr. Bowley is, as he looks — large, generous, whole-souled 
and honest — a man of and always for the people. 

IRA EDGAR RIDER. 

Ir.\ Edg.\r Rider, the Secretary of 
the President of the Borough of Man- 
hattan, was born in Jersey City, Novem- 
ber 17, 1868. After graduating from 
the common schools he entered the 
College of the City of New York, subse- 
quently taking a course at St. Lawrence 
and Cornell. 

Previous to entering the arena of 
politics he contributed to the magazines 
of the day and attained some note as a lecturer. 

Yielding to the solicitations of friends, he took the platform 
as a political speaker in the campaign of 1892, his work at that 
time eliciting favorable comment. He remained with the Demo- 
cratic State Committee for two years, then turned his attention 
to municipal politics, becoming an active worker in the Thirtieth 
PJistrict, then under the leadership of Lawrence Delmour, whom 




he regards as his political father. Ilis most efhective work was 
done in the last campaign. 

He is particularly well known on the upper cast side of the 
city, where his services are in constant demand. 

He ranks well up among the political speakers of the day. 




JOSEPH P. HENNESSY. 

Joseph P. Hennessv, Secretary of the 
President of the Borough of The Bronx, 
was the Secretary of Mr. Haffen as Com- 
missioner of Street Improvements of the 
Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards, 
tluring his incumbency of that office from 
May I, 1893, until its abolition on December 
31 last, under the Charter. This position 
made Mr. Hennessy acquainted with munic- 
ipal routine in all its phases, as affecting 
street improvements, and incidentally with 
all legislation affecting in this sense the Twenty-third and Twent}^- 
fourth Wffirds, composing the Borough of The Bron.x. 

]\Ir. Hennessy learned the printing trade when a boy, and 
became a newspaper reporter subsequently. While thus en- 
gaged he studied law, and was admitted to the Bar in the First 
Department in 1892. Mr. Hennessy published a review in 
January last of the provisions of the Charter affecting borough 
officers, local boards and local improvements, which attracted 
favorable comment. He took it for granted that the local boards 
had the e.xclusive right, under certain circumstances, to recom- 
mend assessable improvements. Such was the official construc- 
tion placed upon the law subsequently. Mr. Hennessy resides at 
No. 875 East One Hundred and Sixty-ninth street. He is a 
member of the Tammany Hall General Committee and many 
other organizations of a non-political character. 



57 



T 

JAMES W. STEVENSON. 

James W. Stevenson, Secretary to the 
President of the Borough of Brooklyn and 
Local Boards of the Borough, was born in 
Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, on August 
24, 1870. He is the son of a farmer. He 
was educated at Grove City College and be- 
came a reporter on the Pittsburg Times in 
1890. Two years later he moved to Brook- 
lyn and was connected with New York news- 
papers until appointed to his present posi- 
tion. During the recent municipal campaign 
i\Ir. Stevenson had charge of the Joiirnal’s political work in 
Brooklyn. His appointment by President Grout was seconded 
by Chairman York of the Kings County Democratic Organiza- 
tion, in recognition of his work for the ticket as a newspaper man 
as well as within party lines. 





DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE. 



The Department of Finance is the depository of all Ciry 
revenues, taxes, assessments, proceeds of the issue of bonds, 
and of all moneys paid to or deposited with it for purposes of 
public improvement and for other public purposes. It is the 
trustee of the City’s estate and moneys, and is an auditor of all 
claims for and against the City of New York. 

Its functions are exercised through not only the general office 
of the Comptroller, but as well in five (5) bureaus, designated 
by law as follows : 

“ 1st. A bureau for the collection of revenues accrumg- 
from rents and interest on bonds and mortgages, and 
revenues arising from the use or sale of property belong- 
ing to or managed by the city, and the management of the 
markets.” 

The chief officer of such bureau is by law designated as ” the 
Collector of City Revenues and the Superintendent of Markets.” 

“ 2d. A bureau for the collection of taxes.” 

The chief officer of such bureau is by law designated as ” the 
Receiver of Taxes.” 

“ 3d. A bureau for the collection of assessments and 
of such taxes, assessments and water rents as are in ar- 
rears.” 

The chief officer of such bureau is by law designated as “ the 
Collector of Assessments and Arrears.” 

“4th. An auditing bureau, which, under the supervi- 
sion of the comptroller, shall audit, revise and settle all 
accounts in which the city is concerned, as debtor or 
creditor.” 

The chief officers of such bureau are by law designated as 
“ Auditors of Accounts.” 

“ 5th. A bureau for the reception and safe-keeping of 
all moneys paid into the treasury of the city, and for the 
payment of money on warrants drawn by the comptroller 
and countersigned by the mayor.” 

The chief officer of such bureau is by law designated as “ the 
Chamberlain.” 



59 



The principal sources of revenue are Croton water rents, 
rents of docks, piers and ferries, railroad franchise compensation 
and percentage, liquor license taxes, interest on investments and 
installment raised by taxation. 

There are many other revenues, but the chief ones are as 
above stated. 

In the old City of New York, in the year 1897, about thirty 
and one-half per cent, of said revenues went to the “ Sinking 
Fund for the Redemption of the City Debt, No. i about 
eleven and one-half per cent, to the “ Sinking Fund for the Re- 
demption of the City Debt, No. 2 ”; about twenty-six and one- 
half per cent, to the “ Sinking Fund for the payment of the 
Interest on the City Debt,” and about thirty-one and one-half 
per cent, to the “ General Fund.” 

The surplus revenues of the “ Sinking Fund for the Payment 
of the Interest on the City Debt,” which amounted to a little 
more than thirteen per cent, of the total revenues, were trans- 
ferable and yearly transferred to the “ Sinking Fund for the 
Redemption of the City Debt, No. i,” so that, in point of fact, 
I the latter Sinking Fund ultimately received in 1897 about forty- 
four per cent, of the City revenues; the “ Sinking Fund for the 
Redemption of the City Debt, No. 2,” about eleven and one-half 
per cent.; the “ Sinking Fund for the payment of the Interest on 
the City Debt ” about thirteen per cent., and the “ General 
Fund ” about thirty-one and one-half per cent. 

Moreover, included in the revenues going into the “ Sinking 
Fund for the Redefption of the City Debt, No. 2 ” there was 
annually raised by tax, under constitutional amendment adopted 
on November 4, 1884, an amount to redeem stock payable from 
taxation. Said sum so raised varied each year, but the amount 
in the tax levy for 1897 was the sum of $1,713,669.80. 

It would be impossible to state in brief form all that has been 
accomplished by the Department of Finance since January t, 
1898, but in general it has investigated, and is still engaged in 
the examination of the books, records and accounts of the 96 
municipal and public corporations consolidated with the former 
City of New York, or for whose liabilities the City of New York, 
as constituted under the Greater New York Charter, is respon- 
sible. 

It has, as closely as possible at this time, ascertained tiie 
bonded indebtedness of the present City of New York, and ap- 
proximately defined its Constitutional limit of indebtedness. 



6o 



The Department is rapidly reducing the financial affiairs of the 
City of New York, as now constituted, to a uniform system. 
iMeanwhile, the current work of the various bureaus of the De- 
partment above referred to is being carried on. 

The method followed by the City in the payment of its bills 
does not, under the new Charter, differ materially from that 
prevailing under the last Charter of the City. 

The system adopted by the Department of Finance not only 
provides for certificates of heads of Departments, Boards and 
Commissions, but also requires such an examination of claims by 
officers of the Department of Finance, as the basis of audit, as 
will determine the legality as well as justice of all claims against 
the City presented for payment. 

The Department requires that all bills against Departments, 
Boards and Commissions, to be paid out of the City Treasury, 
shall be attached to vouchers duly certified by heads of Depart- 
ments, Boards or Commissions, and that compensation to officers 
and employees of the City Government shall be duly certified 
upon pay-rolls. The pay-rolls so certified are duly examined 
by examiners of the Department; bills and vouchers for work 
and supplies, after examination by examiners, are referred to 
inspectors, engineers and others designated by the Comptroller 
for the purpose of inspection of the work and supplies. 

A final audit is made by the Auditor, who passes upon the 
correctness as well as the validity of the pay-rolls and other 
claims. F"pon such audit, and after certification by the Register 
that there is money in the particular appropriation or fund to 
which the pay-roll or claim is chargeable, to meet the same, a 
warrant upon the Chamberlain is signed by the Comptroller and 
Mayor, or by their representatives authorized by law to sign in 
their stead and place. 

A check signed by the Chamberlain is subjoined to the war- 
rant and payment is made by the Disbursing Clerk of the Audit- 
ing Bureau of the Department of Finance after a prescribed 
affidavit has been signed by the claimant, except that in case of 
pay-rolls payment is made by the City Paymaster. 

The increase in the work of the Department since January 
I, 1898, has necessarily been very marked, principally because 
of consolidation. As an instance of the increase of one branch 
of the work it may be noted that in the year 1897, up to July 30, 
there were examined and audited 28,994 vouchers and pay-rolls, 
for which warrants were registered; while in the year 1898, for a 



62 



similar period, the number of such vouchers and pay-rolls was 
36,636, or more than twenty-six per cent, increase. 

This does not indicate what will be the percentage of increase 
for the year, for the reason that thousands of vouchers were 
held pending a determination of the question of Constitutional 
limit of indebtedness, and audit of those so held was not begun 
until about the middle of the year. 

It is estimated that the percentage of increase in this branch 
of work will for the entire year be at least seventy-five per cent., 
and may reach one hundred per cent. 

As an instance of the increase in another branch of the work 
it may be noted that while in 1897 in the old City of New York 
there was one tax levy, there are in 1898, in the present City of 
New York more than one hundred tax levies upon which taxes 
are being collected by the Department of Finance. 

Upon the Department of Finance rests the burden of the 
work of examination of matters going before the Board of Esti- 
mate and Apportionment and the Commissioners of the Sinking 
Fund for their action. 

So closely connected with the administration of the finances 
of the City are said matters coming before said Board and said 
Commission, that necessarily a thorough examination and a 
complete analysis in each case can best be made by the Depart- 
ment of Finance; hence there is a reference to the Comptroller 
for the examination and report of almost every case presented 
for the consideration of said Board and of said Commission. 

The work of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment and 
that of the Commissioners of the Sinking Eund have been very 
much increased since January i, 1898. While the amount of 
normal current work, by reason of consolidation and the annex- 
ation of such a large area of territory to the former City of New 
York, has exceeded that prior to said consolidation, there has 
been an extraordinary increase of the volume of work so far 
necessarily Incident to the adjustment of affairs and the reorgan- 
ization and reconstruction of the various Departments of the new 
City Government. 

The Commissioners of the Sinking Fund of the City of New 
York have also, under the new Charter, taken under their juris- 
diction the control and the management of the several sinking 
funds which existed in connection with the administration of 
government of the several municipal and public corporations 
consolidated with the former City of New York. 



63 



r 



It will thus be noted that with the vast increase of the work 
of said Board and said Commission, there has been a correspond- 
ing increase in that branch of the work of the Department of 
Finance. 

BIRD S. CODER. 

Bird S. Coder, Comptroller of the City of New York, is one 
of the younger school of financiers who has made a study of his 
calling from both a practical and scientific standpoint. 

Previous to his election as Comptroller, Mr. Coler’s business 
relations kept him continually in close touch with State and city 
finances. iNlr. Coler’s father- — W. N. Coler — had for a number of 
years made a special study of municipal bonds and franchises, 
and to the present Comptroller, as a member of the firm of 
which his father is the head, had devolved much of the work in 
this field of finance. 

The experience he gained in this connection, together with 
a training in every branch of the banking business, has enabled 
him to cope sucessfully and on liberal lines with very important 
financial problems, and when, as has been pointed out fre- 
quently by those who are acquainted with Mr. Coler’s career — 
there could be no better equipment for the position he now fills-— 
a financial office second to none in the second greatest city in 
the world. 

Yk N. Coler, father of the present Comptroller, was born in 
Knox County, Ohio, and at the breaking out of the Mexican 
War enlisted in the Second Ohio Regiment. He served through 
the war as a private, and when peace was declared began the 
study of law in his native State. When the Civil \\"ar broke out 
he again enlisted, and for services in the Mexican War was given 
a Colonelcy. After a service of nearly two years he resigned 
his command and resumed his legal practice. His success as a 
financial lawyer prompted him to remove to New York, and in 
1870 he opened an office in this city. The enterprise grew so 
quickly that he gave up the profession of law to devote himself 
entirely to the banking business. 

It was in this business that Comptroller Coler laid the found- 
ation of his financial experience, an experience combined with an 
executive ability of a high order, which was recognized by his 
election as Comptroller of the City of New York. 

‘ Apart from business Mr. Coler has found time to cultivate 
a taste for the best things of life. He devotes his leisure hours 



64 



to scholarly pursuits and if he were not a banker he might 
have been a professor of English literature. He is a lover 
of fine books and rare editions and his library in Brooklyn, where 
he lives, is one of the finest private collections in this country. 

Personally, he is a man of refinement and culture — unassum- 
ing and modest — a man to whom a public office means nothing 
unless it can be used for the public good. 

Mr. Coler is about thirty-five years of age, of an athletic 
make-up and fond of all rational out-door sports. Pie is an active 
and efficient member of the Atlantic Yacht Club, but apart from 
his yachting diversion is equally at home as a whip or upon the 
wheel. Combining the above amusements with his literary tastes 
and adding to them the service he gives to the city, his way of 
living comes as near being that of a well-balanced man as can 
be imagined. 



MICHAEL T. DALY. 

Deputy Comptroller of the City of New York, Michael T. 
Daly, was born in Ireland in 1841, and is now, therefore, fifty- 
seven years of age. He came to America and to New York City 
when but ten years old, and immediately thereafter he entered 
the public schools, attending the College of the City of New 
York, which at that time was known as the Eree Academy. 

When sixteen years old he started to earn a living, securing 
a position as clerk in the office of a broker. He employed his 
spare time in gaining a knowledge of financial affairs, which has 
been the foundation of a varied and extensive political and busi- 
ness career. 

Mr. Daly entered political life at twenty-five years of age, 
receiving his first position from A. Oakey Hall, who was then 
Mayor of the city. He was made a second marshal to the 
Mayor. In 1873 he was appointed Clerk of the Marine Court, 
which position he held until 1876 when he became Chief Clerk 
of the City Court. 

Mr. Daly’s next official position was that of Commissioner 
of Accounts, to which he was appointed in 1891. When Mayor 
Gilroy assumed office he selected Mr. Daly as Commissioner of 
Public Works, where he discharged the duties of this office sat- 
isfactorily and creditably. This, however, did not count for 
much with the incoming administration, for Mayor Strong re- 
moved him, and during his term the office had several incum- 



65 

bents, neither of whom distinguished themselves in the City’s 
interests. 

It is safe to say that in his present position as Deputy Comp- 
troller, Mr. Daly will apply the same business methods he has 
used in conducting the interests of the City in previous capacities. 
He has begun well, and as he is known to have great staying 
power, the public may be assured that there will be no change 
in his methods. 

EDGAR J. LEVEY. 

Edg.ar J. Levey was born in the City of New York, Novem- 
ber 4, 1863. Graduated from Columbia College in 1883 and 
from the Columbia Law School in 1886, in which year he was 
admitted to the Bar. 

In 1887 he formed, with Mr. Edward Hinman, the law firm 
of Hinman & Levey. In 1891 he was appointed Secretary to 
the Comptroller, in the Finance Department. In 1893 he was 
appointed Assistant Deputy Comptroller by Comptroller Myers. 
In 1896, on the death of Deputy Comptroller Storrs, ]\Ir. Levey- 
assumed many of the duties which had formerly been performed 
by that well-known official, becoming Secretary of the Sinking 
Fund Commission, Chief Clerk of the Board of Revision of 
Assessments, and taking charge of the business of the Board of 
Estimate and Apportionment originating in the Department of 
Finance. 

During the term of office of Comptroller Myers, Mr. Levey 
became intimately connected with the development of the in- 
heritance tax law of the State. In most of the difficult litigation 
which arose over this law, Mr. Levey represented the interests 
of the State in the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of 
the United States, and though opposed by the leading lawyers 
of the New York Bar, secured a remarkable percentage of favor- 
able decisions. 

Mr. Levey has been a life-long Democrat, and is a member of 
many of the leading social and political clubs of New York City. 

EDWARD GILON, 

COLLECTOR OF ASSESSMENTS AND ARREARS. 

Col. Edward Gilon, Collector of Assessments and Arrears, 
was born in New York City, August ii, 1838. He was educated 

5 



66 



in the public schools, and when the Civil War broke out had just 
entered upon what promised to be a successful business career. 
Despite this, however, he enlisted and went to the front. He 
was promptly promoted, rose to the rank of Captain and at the 
close of the war received his commission as Colonel of the 
Fifty-fifth Regiment. 

In peaceful walks Col. Gilon has held several important posi- 
tions. For ten years he was Chairman of the Board of Assess- 
ors, and previous to this was one of the conspicuous Aldermen 
of the city. From 1876 to 1880 he was Collector of Assessments, 
and in February, 1894, was reappointed to this office, which he 
now fills to the satisfaction of his superiors and the business 
public. 

In private life Col. Gilon is a gentleman whom it is always 
good to meet, kindly considerate to those under him, earnest and 
sincere in all his undertakings and dealings with others, he com- 
mands the respect of all he comes in contact with. Col. Gilon 
is a Democrat, and his personal efforts to advance the cause of 
his party are well known and recognized. 

DAVID O’BRIEN, 

COLLECTOR OF CITY REVENUE AND SUPERINTENDENT OF MARKETS. 

David O’Brien, Collector of City Revenue and Superin- 
tendent of IMarkets, was born in New York City, in 1842. He 
was educated in the public schools, but wdiile still under age took 
up the trade of a butcher as a means of livelihood. 

For the past thirty years Mr. O’Brien has been one of the 
prominent wholesale meat dealers in West Washington Market, 
and for a number of years was the President of Market Associa- 
tion. This position he held until his official duties compelled him 
to give it up. 

When jMr. O’Brien was President of the West Washington 
Market Association he had full charge of all the legislation con- 
nected with the removal of the market to its present location. 
While he does not claim to be the author of the legislation, he 
was one of the authors of the removal movement, and it was 
largely due to Mr. O’Brien’s efforts that West Washington Mar- 
ket is to-day the finest market system in the United States if not 
in the world. 

It took twenty years to bring about the removal of West 



6 ; 



F 



Washington Market, and while the market business is not as 
profitable as it was a few years ago, the City of New York re- 
ceives twice as much revenue from West Washington Market 
as it formerly did. 

To Mr. O’Brien belongs the credit of managing one of the 
most important departments in the City Government with the 
highest efficiency. 

DAVID E. AUSTEN, 

RECEIVER OF TAXES, CITY OF NEW YORK. 

Col. David E. Austen, Receiver of Taxes, is a citizen the 
city can well claim as one of her sons, for he was not only born 
within her limits but on Revolutionary soil as well. Mr. Austen 
first opened his eyes in the house of his grandfather, David Aus- 
ten, on Bowling Green, who was one of New York’s representa- 
tive business men, besides being identified with the interests of 
the City at that time. 

The father of Col. Austen, David Austen, is now eighty-five 
years of age, and is the oldest member of the Union Club of this 
city. His mother was a daughter of Robert Elwell, in his days 
one of the prominent ship-owners of Maine. 

The subject of this sketch school days began in White Plains, 
where was located the then famous school known as “ The In- 
stitute,” conducted by John Swinburne. He remained there nine 
years and among his classmates who were graduated with him 
were the “ Lorillard boys ” (Pierre, Jacob and George), Samuel 
Milbank, John M. Davies, Thomas Freeborn and other well- 
known New Yorkers. 

Col. Austen began his business career as a clerk with William 
Libbey, afterwards one of the firm of A. T. Stewart & Co., but 
resigned his position to take up the study of chemistry, .which 
knowledge fitted him to fill an important position with the New 
York Kerosene Oil Company. After several years of hard work 
with the above concern, during which time he had charge of 
seven hundred men, Mr. Austen severed his connection with the 
; company, and after a short term in the Custom’s service, during 
I which time he studied law, he was graduated from the New York 
University Law School and admitted to the Bar. 

When ex-Mayor Grant was Comptroller of the City, Col. 
Austen was offered a position in the Finance Department, and for 



68 



several years was one ot the Auditors of Accounts until Theodore 
W. Myers, who was afterwards Comptroller, persuaded him to 
accept the position of Receiver of Taxes made vacant by the 
death of Major George ^IcLean. 

Col. Austen's management of this office is too well known for 
extended comment, suffice it to say that the taxpayers of the 
city are thoroughly satisfied that their interests are in good hands. 
Business methods and only business methods prevail in this 
office. The conduct of the office is a model that could be used 
in any business walk of life, and when it can be said that while 
nearly $45,000,000 are collected annually without the loss of a 
penny some idea of the magnitude of the business transacted and 
responsibility entailed may be gained. 

Apart from his various business career. Col. Austen’s military 
record is equally as successful and interesting. He went to the 
front in 1861 with Company H of the Seventh Regiment, and 
after two years of service returned and organized a company for 
the Forty-seventh Regiment, and, as First Lieutenant, again 
went to the front, and while crossing Long Bridge with his com- 
pany was sent for by his Colonel and appointed Regimental Ad- 
jutant. 

After the war he was, in turn. Captain, Major and Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Forty-seventh. In May, 1868, he -was commis- 
sioned as Colonel, being at that time the youngest Colonel in the 
service. He served as Colonel of the Forty-seventh until July, 
1877, when he was elected Colonel of the Thirteenth Brooklyn. 

Under the leadership of Colonel Austen, the Thirteenth, from 
a somewhat demoralized, unorganized body of men, became one 
of the crack regiments of the State. Through his efforts in se- 
curing appropriations and zeal in pushing the work, the Thir- 
teenth has now one of the finest and said to be the most perfectly 
equipped armory in the State. 

It is only necessary to refer to the trolley strikes in Brooklyn, 
the railway strike in Buffalo and the baymen"s rioting at Babylon 
and Fire Island to show that a military company in a time of 
peace can be made a practical organization ready to cope with 
any emergency where decisive action is required. The services 
of the Thirteenth under the leadership of Colonel Austen during 
the above disturbances are still young history, but they will live 
in military records. 

Colonel Austen is interested in yachting and has been for 
several years Secretary of the .\tlantic Yacht Club, which has 







deputy 









70 



nearly doubled its membership since its organization, and is now 
one of the leading yacht clubs of the country. 

Mr. Austen is also a member of the Knickerbocker Athletic 
Club, the League of American Wheelmen and the Army and 
Navy Club, of which he is one of its Governors. In politics 
Colonel Austen is a Democrat, and in addition to being a mem- 
ber of the Tammany .Society is one of the earlier members of 
the Democratic Club. 

Colonel Austen, as the head of various business and military 
interests, has always been a strict disciplinarian, but he has never 
exercised his authority except for the common good and the 
esprit dn corps of the body he was in command of. 

In the line of duty Colonel Austen holds each man to a full 
performance of his duty, no partiality is shown, and a fatherly 
interest is taken in all. It is not difficult to understand, therefore. 
Colonel Austen’s natural leadership over and popularity with men 
who serve under him. 

JOHN j. McDonough. 

John J. McDonough, Deputy Receiver of Taxes for the 
City of New York, was born in this city in 1850. He attended 
public school until he was thirteen years of age, and since that 
time has been continuously identified with the business and po- 
litical life of the metropolis. Mr. McDonough’s record is a fine 
one from the time he started as an office boy in the employ of 
the Second Avenue Surface Railroad Company in 1863. In 
1871 he was made one of the receivers in the office of the com- 
pany. In 1874 he was promoted to the position of paymaster 
and cashier of the company, and in this capacity, where he re- 
mained fourteen years, he had a varied and stirring series of ex- 
periences which few men in a like capacity meet with. His 
dealings with conductors alone required the utmost vigilance, 
and ordinarily was all the work necessary for one man to do. 
Apart from this work, however, Mr. McDonough’s duties re- 
quired him to make the bank deposits and withdrawals. In 
those days, when the city wa-s not so well policed as it is at pres- 
ent, it was often a dangerous thing to carry large sums of money 
on the person. Mr. McDonough was frequently followed after 
he had drawn the money necessary to pay the employees of the 
road, and on one occasion was attacked by three men, and al- 
though red pepper was thrown in his eyes and he was brutally 



71 



attacked, he succeeded in making his escape with $3,000 of the 
company’s money which his assailants were unable to reach. 

This act alone was evidence enough of his faithfulness and 
capacity to fill a more important financial position. In 1889 he 
left the Second Avenue Surface Railroad to take the position of 
cashier to the Board of Excise.' In 1891 he resigned to accept 
the position of Deputy Tax Commissioner, where he remained 
until 1893, when he again resigned to become Deputy Receiver 
of Taxes, which position he holds at present. 



WILLIAM McKINNY. 

William McKinny, First Auditor of Accounts of the Bor- 
ough of Brooklyn of the Greater New York, was born on Septem- 
ber 18, 1855, on Christopher street, in the City of New York, the 
site now occupied by the new Appraiser’s Stores. At the age of 
seven his parents moved to Brooklyn, where he attended school 
at the Adelphi Academy. He started in business when seven- 
teen years old with the wholesale tea house of Gross, March & 
Co., and three years later entered the firm of George C. Chase 
& Company, as a partner, where he remained fifteen years. Some 
little time was then spent by him traveling abroad, and on his re- 
turn to this country he was tendered the position as Assistant and 
Deputy Appraiser of Merchandise of the Port of New York, by 
Grover Cleveland, in 1892, which position he resigned in Janu- 
ary, 1898, to take the position of First Auditor of Accounts of 
the Borough of Brooklyn. 

Mr. McKinny impresses all with whom he comes in contact 
by a manly and courteous bearing, combined with an energetic 
and kindly nature. He carries these qualities both in social and 
business walks, and is the same man on all occasions. As a 
member of the Montauk Club in Brooklyn, by his neighbors in 
the same city and the business world who know him, he is es- 
teemed and admired for a rare combination of the above quali- 
ties — genuine qualities which win, keep and hold friends, no 
matter where they are placed. 



WALTER H. HOLT. 



Walter H. Holt, Auditor of the Borough of Richmond, 
was born at Salisbury, N. C. He was educated in the schools 



72 



of his native village, and at the age of sixteen started out to make 
his way in the world. 

In 1880 he came to New York and was employed in the 
offices of the Manhattan Elevated Railroad until 1886, when he 
entered the law offices of Davies, Cole & Rapallo as a law student. 

Mr. Holt was admitted to th'e Bar in 1893, but remained with 
the same firm until 1897, when he began the practice of law on 
his own account, which, with his associate, Ezra Tuttle, he still 
keeps up. 

In 1896 Mr. Holt was the Democratic .candidate for the 
Assembly from his district, and although defeated ran 900 votes 
ahead of the head of his ticket. 

The office of Auditor, which Mr. Holt now holds, takes the 
place of the former County Treasurer, and all Village Clerks, 
Treasurers and Town Clerks. He also audits all claims against 
the County and is the head of the Finance Department of the 
borough. 

In 1893 Mr. Holt married a daughter of one of the oldest 
Staten Island families, which has title deeds from King George 
IV. 

Auditor Holt is a popular and familiar figure on Staten 
Island, and is a well-known member of the New York Demo- 
cratic Club and Tammany Hall. He is also a member of the 
following Staten Island Clubs : Whist Club, Quartette Club, 

Democratic Club and Kill von Kull Yacht Club. 

While living in New' York City was on General Committee 
and Committee on Organization of Tammany Hall, and member 
of Narragansett Club and Bedford Avenue Democratic Club of 
Brooklyn. 

JOHN J. FETHERSTON, 

DEPUTY RECEIVER OF TAXES, BOROUGH OF RICHMOND. 

John J. Fetherston, Deputy Receiver of Taxes for the Bor- 
ough of Richmond, has been a life-long resident of Richmond 
County, and although engaged in private business has been 
prominently identified with the public life. 

He has held various offices, having been Chief of the North 
Sliore Fire Department for one term. Trustee of the First Ward 
of the Village of New Brighton for ten years, which office he re- 
signed in 1892 to accept the office of Treasurer of the Village 



73 



' of New Brighton, to which office he was appointed by the 
unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees. He held this office 
until January l, 1898, when the village was merged into the 
Greater New York. 

On January 2, 1898, he was appointed Deputy Receiver of 
Taxes for Richmond Borough, an appointment which was not 
only highly satisfactory to the business public of Staten Island 
but also to the old residents and property-holders of that locality 
who have known Mr. Fetherston from boyhood. 

Mr. Fetherston has always been known as an official of un- 
questioned integrity and honesty, and is w'ell qualified to dis- 
charge the duties of the office to which he has been appointed. 

GEORGE BRAND. 

DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF ASSESSMENTS AND ARREARS, BOROUGH OF 
RICHMOND. 

George Brand, Deputy Collector of Assessments and Ar- 
rears for the Borough of Richmond, was born in Stapleton, S. I., 
in i860, and was educated in the public schools of his native 
place. 

In 1892 he was elected Tax Collector of School District No. 
2 of Middletowm and Southfield, the largest school district in the 
county. He held this office continuously from 1892 to 1897, 
when the office was abolished. 

He was elected Town Clerk of the Town of Middletown in 
1892 and was re-elected each year until the new Charter abol- 
ished the town offices. 

On the organization of the new City Government Mr. Brand 
i was appointed Collector of Assessments and Arrears and has his 
office in the ^''illage Hall in Stapleton. 

FREDERICK W. BLECKWENN. 

Frederick \V. Bleckwenn, the Deputy Receiver of Taxes 
for the Borough of Queens, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 
1839. After graduating from school he learned the book trade, 
I and for several years managed a large circulating library in the 
City of Hanover, where he acquired a thorough literar}- educa- 
; tion. In the year 1858 he came to this country and soon found 
employment in the publishing and importing house of William 



74 



Radcle, in New York City. By very close application to business 
he soon advanced to a position of trust and confidence. Having 
special charge of the vast landed interests of his employer, he 
received a valuable training in the real estate business. In the 
publishing branch of the business he put into practical use his 
literary acquirements. 

When his employer was elected an Alderman of the City of 
New York, Mr. Bleckwenn, in his confidential capacity, gained 
quite a knowledge of public and municipal affairs. 

After important changes in said firm, Mr. Bleckwenn, in 
1880, accepted the position of bookkeeper and cashier with the 
well-known firm of Keuffel & Esser, of New York. 

In the fall of 1882 Mr. Bleckwenn was appointed by the Com- 
mon Council of Long Island City to the office of City Treasurer 
and Receiver of Taxes (then vacant), and at the same time re- 
ceived the nomination for that office for ’the next full term. He 
was elected by a handsome majority for the term ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1885. In that year he was re-elected, without opposition, 
for another term of three years. In 1888 he was re-elected for 
a third term and in 1891 for a fourth term of three years, and 
retired from office on December 31, 1894, after a continuous ser- 
vice of over twelve years. 

During the last three years Mr. Bleckwenn has been engaged 
in the real estate business. 

Mr. Bleckwenn is a life-long Democrat. He is one of the 
Trustees of the Long Island City Building and Loan Association 
and a member of the “Frohsinn ” and “ Astoria Maennerchor ” 
Singing Societies, and of the “ Long Island City Turn Verein.” 
He is a man of plain and correct habits and happy disposition. 

JOHN F. GOULDSBURY, 

FIRST .\UDITOR OF ACCOUNTS. 

John F. Gouldsbury was born in the City of New York on 
May 13, 1848. He was educated in the De La Salle Institute 
and the College of St. Francis Xavier. 

After leaving school he entered mercantile life in the old dry 
goods house of Lake & McCreery, whom he left to enter the 
jobbing house of Butler. Broome & Clapp, where he remained 
until he entered the establishment of his father, who was at that 
time one of the leading marble workers for interior decorations in 
the city. 



75 



In 1877 he was appointed Registrar of Claims in the Comp- 
troller’s Office by the late John Kelly. Under succeeding Comp- 
trollers his advancement has been marked, as is evidenced by the 
fact that he is now the First Auditor of Accounts of the Depart- 
ment of Finance of the Greater New York. 

He has always been identified with the Tammany organiza- 
tion, and has been a member of the Tammany Society for several 
years. 

WILLIAM F. BAKER. 

Wi;.LiAM F. Baker, Secretary to Comptroller Coler, was 
born in Pittsburgh, Pa., about thirty years ago. He received his 
education there, and when he moved to New York in 1881 he 
had the foundation of a good business training, together with 
an equipment of common sense and honesty that have always 
stood him in good stead. 

Previous to January first of this year Mr. Baker had been 
engaged in the transportation business, in which he was success- 
ful from the start. 

When Mr. Coler became Comptroller he offered Mr. Baker 
the position of Private Secretary, which he accepted. Since his 
occupancy of the place he has displayed a combination of quali- 
ties which stamp him at once as the man thoroughly at home 
with his duties. 

He impresses all with whom he comes in contact as a young 
man of tact and good judgment, and the fact that he is popular 
verifies this impression. 

Mr. Baker is just as well liked socially. He has been a resi- 
dent of Brooklyn for the past ten years, in which borough he is 
a member of several clubs. 



PATRICK KEENAN, 

CHAMBERLAIN OF NEW YORK. 

Patrick Keenan, Chamberlain of New York, was born in- 
County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1837. He came to America when he 
was fourteen years old and settled in New York, where he has 
lived continuously since.' 

Mr. Keenan’s first employment was that of a plumber’s ap- 
prentice, in which capacity he only remained long enough to- 
know that he was capable of far better things. In 1863 he 



76 



engaged in business on his own account, and twenty years later, 
as a result of his energy, industry and foresight, was able to 
retire with a competence. 

Mr. Keenan’s first official position w'as in 1872, when he was 
elected a member of the Board of Assistant Aldermen. Later he 
became a member of the Board of Aldermen, in which capacity 
he served until 1882, when he was elected County Clerk, which 
position he held until 1885. 

During all these years Mr. Keenan took an active part in the 
political welfare of the city and his party, and from the date of 
his first affiliation with a political organization up to the present 
time he has always been a leader. This is easily understood. 
To meet him once is to feel the presence of a great reserve force. 
Self-contained and unassuming, without a trace of the autocrat 
or dictator in his make-up, he puts all who are associated with 
him at their ease and makes them feel that respect for themselves 
and for him which is only possible with a man of his stamp. 
Political leaders who live do not command. Mr. Keenan’s per- 
sonality is such that he wins where a lesser light would repel. 

The power to please, alone, however, is never a vital cause 
for the success of any one. Mr. Keenan has demonstrated, both 
in private and public affairs, that he knows what to do, and his 
entire course has shown that he can and does select the right 
men to carry out his ideas of how a public official can best serve 
the people. 



JOHN H. TIMMERMAN, 

CITV PAYMASTER. 

Mr. Timmerman was born December 28, 1845, City of 

New York. He received his education in private schools of this 
city, and later took a course in a business college. In 1866 he 
became a Searcher in the County Clerk’s Office, being later pro- 
moted to the position of Chief Searcher and Cashier, which posi- 
tion he held until 1873, when he was elected Secretary of the 
Eleventh Ward Savings Bank. He remained with this bank 
until 1885, when he was made Auditor of the Acjueduct Commis- 
sion. 

During the time he was connected with the bank he continued 
his studies of book-keeping and accounting, and in 1883 was 
elected a member of the Institute of Accounts, and did consider- 
able e.xpert accounting for corporations and individuals. 



77 



In 1886 he was made City Paymaster and has continued in 
this office until the present time. Pie has handled many millions 
of dollars during his business career, and as City Paymaster has 
paid out about $200,000,000 without causing the loss of a penny 
to the City, and has, during this time, signed over 1,500,000 
checks for City employees. 

He is a hard worker and is never seen idle. The various 
Comptrollers have been thoroughly satisfied with his administra- 
tion of the Paymaster’s Office, and he has received many words 
of praise from them, as also from City employees and the public, 
for the manner in which the business of his office is conducted. 

Aside from the routine work which his position demands, Mr. 
Timmerman has surrounded the office over which he presides 
with a peculiarly human interest rarely found either in a private 
or public business. He never lets an opportunity slip when he 
can hasten or facilitate the payment of salary to the heirs of a 
deceased City employee, and is constantly doing acts of this nature 
whenever they present themselves. 




i 



THE BOARD OF PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS. 

It was plain to the minds of the Commission who framed the 
new’ Charter, that on account of the large and costly range of pub- 
lic works which w’ould be initiated in the Greater New York, that 
an appropriate and effective check should be established; and for 
this purpose they designated a department to be knowui as “ The 
Board of Public Improvements,” which consists of a President, 
appointed by the Mayor, the Commissioner of Plighways, Com- 
missioner of Sewers, Commissioner of Water Supply, Commis- 
sioner of Bridges, Commissioner of Public Buildings, Lighting 
and Supplies, and the Commissioner of Street Cleaning, and, ex 
officio, the Mayor, Comptroller, Corporation Counsel and the Pres- 
idents of the boroughs. 

The said department has jurisdiction over the bridges, streets, 
avenues, the water supply and sewer systems, acquiring title to 
lands for street opening, and other purposes. The initiative in all 
public improvements must be taken by this Board, as such w’orks 
require to be primarily determined by expert authority, so that 
they may be developed upon a fixed plan and designed and con- 
structed in accordance with scientific skill; and any action taken 
by this Board upon important questions that arise in connection 
with the public works, cannot fail to be of great advantage to the 
City. 

The ordinances for all public improvements, such as the lay- 
ing of water mains, extending and constructing water works, the 
grading and paving of streets, encroachments upon the streets, 
construction, etc., of public markets, the cleaning and sprinkling 
of streets, the laying of gas-pipes and electric wires, etc., the erect- 
ing of public buildings, and the making of all contracts and agree- 
ments in relation thereto, entailing a large amount of work, have 
been prepared by this Board for recom.mendation to the Munici- 
pal Assembly. 

Resolutions for extensive improvements in the water w’orks 
and for extending the water system of the city have been adopted, 
together with many improvements for paving and repaving the 
streets, constructing sewers, etc. 



8o 



A tentative plan for the street system of the territory east of 
the Bronx river (a work of great magnitude), has been completed 
by the Topographical Bureau of this Department, and approved 
by the Board. Plans of the same, in sections, will be completed as 
speedily as possible, and after adoption will be placed on record. 
The Borough of Queens, comprising about 85,000 acres, of which 
only Long Island City has been laid out in streets, will receive the 
attention of the Department as soon as funds are provided for the 
surveying and laying out of streets, etc. The Boroughs of Brook- 
lyn, Queens and Richmond are very much in need of a complete 
lay-out, and it is expected that work will be commenced in these 
boroughs in 1899. No improvements can be carried out until 
the streets are legally opened, and much inconvenience and dam- 
age is done to the public on account of the inability of this De- 
partment to authorize the grading or sewering of streets and lay- 
ing of water-mains. 

The business of the Department has been steadily increasing 
since its first meeting, and as many as fifty resolutions for new 
work have been submitted at one meeting of the Board, which 
meets weekly. The confusion which existed in the Local Boards 
as to their powers and duties have been defined by the Corpora- 
tion Counsel, and it is expected that many more resolutions will 
be submitted in the future by the presidents of same. 

This Board has been hampered in its business by indefinite 
and incomplete references in the Charter, and also on account of 
the bonded indebtedness of the city having been exceeded by the 
})revious administration; but it has now reached a point where 
these obstructions are, to some extent, overcome. As a result, its 
business will now undoubtedly be advanced more rapidly, and will 
be greatly increased when public work can be authorized in the 
Boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens and Richmond. 

Four hundred and eighty-seven resolutions have been intro- 
duced from January to July, 1898, of which there were: 

33 for regulating, grading, etc., of streets. 

34 for regulating, paving, etc., of streets. 

104 for repaving streets. 

24 for fencing vacant lots. 

40 for flagging sidewalks. 

7 for laying crosswalks. 

39 for laying sewers. 

22 for laying water-mains. 

13 for electric lighting. 



8i 



7 for laying gas-mains. 

25 for change of grade of streets. 

14 for street openings. 

1 1 for extending and widening of streets.' 

12 for acquiring title to land. 

Since July i, until September i, 1898, about 250 resolutions 
pertaining to matters as stated above have been introduced, show- 
ing a large average increase, which shows the great magnitude of 
work performed by this Board. 

MAURICE F. HOLAHAN, ; 

PRESIDENT, BOARD OF PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS. 

Maurice F. Holapian, the President of the Board of Public 
Improvements, which is one of the most important departments 
in the municipal government, is fifty years of age. He has had 
a wide experience in public affairs, having been connected with 
both branches of the State Legislature — as a member of the lower 
house and Clerk of the Senate. Under the Cleveland administra- 
tion he was appointed Chief of Customs in the Treasury Depart- 
ment, and from there promoted to the Port of New York as Chief 
Special Agent of the Treasury Department, with jurisdiction over 
the States of New York, Connecticut and New Jersey. In con- 
nection with the Collector of the Port, Hon. Daniel E. Magone, 
he assisted in the reorganization of the Custom House and the 
Appraiser’s Department, and it was upon his official investiga- 
tion and report to Secretaries Manning and Fairchild that im- 
portant and salutary changes were made in the polariscopic 
examinations of sugar. 

While in the service of the National Government, he investi- 
gated, pursuant to a resolution of Congress, the Fisheries ques- 
tion, and succeeded in indicting owners of vessels from Halifax 
and Prince Edward’s Island who were engaged in bringing to 
the port of Boston fishermen under contract. Later, he was as- 
signed to stop opium smuggling on the Canadian frontier, and, 
though engaged in a perilous work, he arrested the prominent 
leaders of the band of smugglers and secured their conviction 
in the United States Courts. 

In 1889 he left the Government service to accept the position 
of Commissioner of Accounts in this city. The following year, 
at the earnest solicitation of ex-Mayor Gilroy, who was then 



6 



S2 



Commissioner of Public Works, he accepted the deputyship and 
remained in the Department until legislated out of office in 1895. 

President Holahan has been a member of Tammany Hall for 
twenty-five years, and for many years past has served as scribe 
of the Tammany Society. He received his education in Grammar 
School No. 35, and entered the College of the City of New York 
in 1863. He also attended the Washington University Law 
School. 

He is an indefatigable worker and is one of the best posted 
men on municipal affairs in the city. 

Mr. Holahan is a man to whom hard work is a pleasure and 
he has no amusements which have not a strong element of work 
connected with them. He is always to be found at his post early 
and late. He knows no holidays or “ days off ” when the office 
over which he presides is open to the public, and he has forgot- 
ten the year when he last took a vacation. He is at his best 
when he has an opportunity to address a political audience, and 
has the reputation of being one of the most vigorous and con- 
vincing public speakers in the State. 



■ JOHN H. MOONEY. 

John H. Mooney, Secretary- of the Board of Public Improve- 
ments, was born in New York, where his boyhood days were 
spent, and where, between the public school and several private 
tutors, he received his education. 

Mr. Mooney’s entry into public life was made as secretary of 
the Commissioner of Accounts, where he displayed a fine ability 
and showed such a general familiarity with the work of the office 
that he was made Commissioner of Accounts, which office, as 
time has since proven, he filled with credit to the city, his party 
and himself. 

Since then i\Ir. Mooney has held several prominent positions 
of public trust. In addition to being one of the original Brook- 
lyn Bridge Trustees and a member of the Board of Assessors, 
was one of the expert accountants appointed by ex-Comptroller 
Fitch to examine the financial condition of the several outlying 
districts about to become a part of the Greater New York. In 
answer to some questions asked Mr. Fitch by a representative of 
the press, he said that he did not know the politics of any of the 
gentlemen, that he had selected them only because of their quali- 
fications and experiences, and as to Mr. Mooney in particular, 



83 



because of this he had assigned him to the most difficult part of 
the proposed examinations — namely, Queens County. 

Outside of his official duties Mr. Mooney has always taken 
an active interest in the welfare of the Democratic party, but this 
interest has at the same time always been identified with the wel- 
fare of the city and State. Among the other measures with 
which his name is connected is the “ Compromise Resolution,” 
of which he is the author. Under this resolution President 
Clevland was nominated for Governor of the State of New York 
by the State Convention held in Syracuse in June, 1884. 

Mr. Mooney, besides being a prominent member of the Tam- 
many Society, is a member of the New York Athletic, Demo- 
cratic and Press Clubs. He is also a Veteran of the Ninth Regi- 
ment National Guard, and takes an interest in military matters 
generally. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS. 

The Commissioner of Highways has control of the regulating, 
grading, curbing and flagging, guttering of streets, and laying of 
crosswalks. In addition to the above the Department has charge 
of the constructing and repaving of public roads, of the paving, 
repaving and repairing of all streets; of the laying and relaying 
of surface railroad tracks, of the form of rail and the method of 
construction. The Department also has jurisdiction over the 
filling of sunken lots, fencing of vacant lots, on the removal of 
incumbrances and the issue of permits to builders and others to 
use the streets, but not to open them. 

It will thus be seen that the duties of this Department are of 
great variety and importance. The employees necessary to 
conduct the work of the Department run into the hundreds and 
are under the control of a number of bureaus and commissions 
which carry out the work specified. These bureaus and commis- 
sions consist of the Bureau of Streets and Roads, Bureau in 
Charge of Street Improvements, Bureau of Incumbrances and 
Sub-Surface Construction. In the Borough of Brooklyn there is 
a Deputy Commissioner of Highways and a Bureau of Street 
Repairs. In the Boroughs of The Bronx, Queens and Richmond 
there is a Deputy Commissioner of Highways for each borough. 



84 



JAMES P. KEATING, 

COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS. 

James P. Keating was born in Limerick, Ireland, on Sep- 
tember 20, 1849. When two years old he accompanied his par- 
ents to this city, in the public schools of which he was educated 
and graduated. Subsequently he was employed by various mer- 
cantile houses, and was connected with the postal service to the 
Union army. On his return to this city, in 1869, he began to 
learn the trade of plastering, with such success that he soon 
superintended that part of the construction of the leading build- 
ings of the city, and became in 1872 President of the Plasterers’ 
Association, charged with the interests of that branch of labor 
in the metropolis. 

An almost fatal illness compelled for a long time the cessation 
of all labors. On regaining his health he became Chief Clerk 
in the Penalties Bureau of the Corporation Counsel’s Office, 
where he served for twelve years under many of the now famous 
legal advisers of the City. He then became and for four years 
was Warden of the County Jail, after which he was appointed 
Chief Clerk of the City Court, of which Mayor Van Wyck was 
then a member. After two years service here, he became Chief 
Clerk of the Court of Special Sessions, and was on January i, 
1898, appointed by Mayor Van Wyck Commissioner of High- 
ways of Greater New York. 

Mr. Keating has always taken a very keen, active interest in 
Democratic politics, and has for many years managed party 
affairs in one of the strongest Democratic districts of the city. 
Since 1872 he has been the intimate associate of Mr. Richard 
Croker. In 1867 he joined the Tammany Society; in 1888, with 
Mr. Croker, Judge Pryor, Surrogate Ransom, Justice Pitzsimons, 
and others, he incorporated the Tammany Central Association, 
of which he was President for seven years, and which, with a 
membership of over seven hundred, is highly prosperous. Mr. 
Keating has been a delegate to many conventions, and is at 
present a member of the Executive Committee of Tammany Hall 
from the Twentieth Assembly District. 

He has, despite his long and varied public service, been inti- 
mately connected with the development of the phosphate lands 
of Florida, and of real estate in Yorkville and Harlem, in both 
of which he has large interests. 



86 



HENRY P. MORRISON. 

Henry Prentice Morrison, Deputy Commissioner and 
Chief Engineer of Highways and Sewers and Deputy Commis- 
sioner of Water Supply, was born in Troy, N. Y., January 14, 
1858. 

His early education consisted of a course in the public schools 
of New York City, from which he was graduated in 1873. From 
here he went to Clark’s Academy, graduating in 1876, when he 
entered the University of the City of New York as a freshman, 
graduating in 1880, and having two degrees conferred upon him. 
Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer. 

After graduating from the University Mr. Morrison received 
a position with John S. Bogert, then Secretary of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, as Secretary to that gentleman. His 
health being poor he sought active field work and secured an en- 
gagement on the Eastern Shore Railroad of Maryland, and there 
remained until he was appointed to the Department of Public 
Works in New York City, being assigned to the Bureau of 
Sewers. He followed sewerage engineering for eighteen months 
and was then promoted and transferred to the paving department, 
bcoming first assistant to Horace Loomis, then engineer in 
charge of paving in New York City. For the past seventeen years 
he has made a specialty of paving and road building, estimated 
for and performed the engineering work on over six million 
dollars’ worth of paving of all classes, an experience in that line 
such as few engineers in the United States have had. 

In the spring of 1893 Mr Morrison was appointed County 
Road Engineer, and has performed his work in that capacity 
with skill and ability. During the past five years he has 
built about sixty miles of macadam roads and these are 
acknowledged to be among the best roads in the State. Mr. 
Morrison’s work on Staten Island has given him a wide reputa- 
tion as a road builder, and he is often called upon to give lectures 
on road building before public bodies, and his advice is sought 
by public officials and road engineers throughout the entire 
State, New England and New Jersey. His roads have become 
the models wherever the new movement for good roads has 
gained a foothold. He has made Staten Island the paradise of 
bicyclists, and every fair day in summer thousands of wheelmen 
and wheelwomen are seen spinning along our highways. These 
roads have become an important source of revenue to Staten 



r 



87 



Islanders, as bicyclists spend hundreds of thousands of dollars 
here each year. Mr. Morrison is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

JOHN P. MADDEN. 

John P. Madden, of No. 27 Ely avenue. Long Island City, 
is Deputy Commissioner of Highways and Street Cleaning for 
the Borough of Queens. He was born in 1863, and his political 
career since has been strongly indicative of the stirring times the 
country was then witnessing. 

Long Island City was always noted as the hot-bed of political 
strife and Mr. Madden was ever found in the thickest of the fray. 

He worked as telegraph operator for the Standard Oil Com- 
pany for a number of years and then became a reporter for the 
Long Island City Star. When Edward Floyd-Jones went to 
Albany as State Senator, he took Mr. Madden with him as h'is 
private Secretary; Mr. Madden was also appointed clerk to the 
Senate Committee on City. 

He served one term in the Assembly and by intelligent appli- 
cation of his untiring energy secured much valuable legislation 
for Long Island City. Among many other beneficial measures 
he passed what is known as the “ Madden Gas Bill,” which re- 
duced the price of gas from $2 to $1.25 per thousand cubic feet, 
other clauses in the bill made it impossible for a gas company to 
charge more for gas in Long Island City than was being charged 
in New York City, which has since caused the still further reduc- 
tion to $1.15. This made a net saving to the consumers of Mr. 
Madden’s district of over one hundred thousand dollars per an- 
num. The enactment of this law — accomplished in the face of the 
strenuous opposition of the Standard Oil Company — made its 
author popular with the people and caused his party to nominate 
him for Mayor at the ensuing fall election. There were three 
candidates in the field, but the fight was principally between Mr. 
IVIadden and IMr. Gleason; for weeks after election each side 
claimed to be victorious; the matter was taken to the courts, 
where Mr. Gleason was finally declared elected by a plurality of 
sixteen. Mr. Madden then became editor of The Nciv York 
Electrical Doings. 

He was Presidential Elector on the Bryan ticket. Under the 
efficient management of Commissioner Madden the Highway 
Department of the Borough has been organized in a manner that 



L 



is resulting in many improved roads, in which the bicyclist is 
particularly well looked out for. 

Mr. Madden has been chairman of the First Assembly Dis- 
trict Democratic General Committee for years. In the primaries 
held in June, under the new primary law, Mr. Madden elected the 
majority of the members to the County Committee, and was 
chosen its Chairman, thereby succeeding John H. Sutphin as 
leader of the Democratic party for the Borough of Queens. 

THOMAS R. FARRELL. 

Thomas R. Farrell, Deputy Commissioner of Highways for 
the Borough of Brooklyn, was born in Ireland forty-eight years 
ago, but came to this country with his parents when less than a 
year old. The family settled in what is now the Ninth Ward, 
then a sparsely settled section of Brooklyn. He grew up with 
the neighborhood, and probably did as much toward its develop- 
ment as any other resident. P'or many years he was engaged in 
the real estate and building business, and erected many fine 
structures. Mr. Farrell has been active in politics since he 
attained his majority. He is a member of the Kings County 
Democratic General Committee, and is the Democratic leader 
of the Eleventh Assembly District. His present position is not 
the first political honor conferred upon Mr. Larrell by his party. 
He served for several years in the office of the City Cle^k of 
Brooklyn, and later, for a period of twelve years, was an attache 
of the Brooklyn Linance Department. 

Mr. Larrell is a member of several social, fraternal and bene- 
ficial organizations, including the Knights of Columbus, the 
Carleton Club and the C. B. L. 



DEPARTMENT OF SEWERS. 

The Commissioner of Sewers has control of all matters relat- 
ing to public sewers and drainage of the City, the making of plans 
for drainage and the construction of all sewers in accordance 
with such plans. He must also prepare and execute all contracts 
relating to the sewers for submission to the Board of Public 
Improvements, and shall supervise all work done under such con- 
tracts. The care, management and maintenance of the sewer and 
drainage system, and the licensing of all cisterns and cesspools 
are intrusted to him. 




M. F. Donohue. 
Matthew J. Goldner. 



James Ka.\e. 
Willi A^ t Brennan. 




90 



JAAIES KANE, 

COMMISSIONER OF SEWERS. 

J.-\MES K.‘\ne was born in Ireland about fifty-seven years ago; 
his parents came to this country when he was five years old. 
Was educated in the public schools, and at the age of nineteen 
assisted in organizing Company G of the 158th Regiment, New 
York Volunteer Infantry, and went to war as its Eirst Lieutenant 
and was shortly after made Captain of the same Company. 

At the close of the war engaged in business in the manufac- 
ture of mineral waters, and took an active part in politics, and 
represented his ward and district in the Common Council from 
January i, 1874, to December, 1888, when he resigned to accept 
the office of Register of Kings County, having been elected in 
November, 1888. On January i, 1889, assumed the duties of 
the office of Register, and held the same until January i, 1892. 

On January i, 1898, was appointed Commissioner of the 
Department of Sewers of the greater city. 

In politics he has always been a Democrat. 

MATTHEW F. DONOHUE. 

M.^tthew F. Donohue, Deputy Commissioner of Sewers, 
Borough of Manhattan, was born in New York City, November 
II, 1867. After graduating from Fourteenth Street Public 
School and Cooper Union he served an apprenticeship at the 
plumbing trade, and while engaged at his trade he was always 
recognized as an earnest advocate of organized labor, having 
been a member of K. of L. Assembly 1992, New York City, and 
one of the organizers of the present local association. He served 
as Vice-President and Secretary for four years, during two years 
of which time he was Secretary of the State Association, resign- 
ing his membership in 1891, at which time he entered the employ 
of the City as Sanitary Inspector in the Board of Health. 

His rise in public and political life has dated from that time. 
Although one of the youngest of the Democratic leaders in the 
Tammany Organization his earnest, sincere, active and unceasing 
efforts for the success of his party has earned him the commen- 
dation of political friends and foes. 

The success of the local campaign, as conducted under his 
management in the Twenty-first Assembly District during the 
canvass of 1897, earned the praises of all factions in his party. 



91 



and the honor conferred upon him in his appointment as Deputy 
Commissioner of Sewers is an evidence that faithful, honest and 
efficient service will earn its own reward. He has a warm and 
genial nature, attracting those with whom he comes in contact, 
and his friends are legion. 

WILLIAM BRENNAN. 

William Brennan, Deputy Commissioner of Sewers for the 
Borough of Brooklyn, was born in Brooklyn in 1856, and has 
resided there since, growing up with the city and contributing 
his share toward its political welfare. 

Mr. Brennan received his education in the public schools of 
Brooklyn, afterwards learning the trade of brick laying, which 
he followed until 1889 when he was appointed Superintendent 
of Street Repairs in the old City Works Department. 

He held the above position until the defeat of the Democratic 
party in 1893, when he was removed for purely political reasons. 
Mr. Brennan’s reputation as a faithful and competent City em- 
ployee, however, was well known, and a few months after a 
Republican took possession of his former position he was ap- 
pointed Custodian in the United States Pension Agency in New 
York City. This position he held until January, 1898, when he 
resigned to accept the office, under the new Charter, of Deputy 
Commissioner of Sewers for the Borough of Brooklyn. 

Mr. Brennan was the Democratic leader of the Seventeenth 
Ward, Brooklyn, until the new Assembly District lines were 
formed and the party organized into Assembly Districts, when 
he became the leader of the Thirteenth Assembly District. 

MATTHEW J. GOLDNER. 

Matthew J. Goldner, Deputy Commissioner of Sewers of 
the Borough of Queens, has been Under Sheriff and Sheriff of 
Queens County, Commissioner of Education and City Clerk of 
Long Island City. He was born in New York City in 1856 and 
with his parents came' to Long Island City in 1865, where his 
father, until the present, carries on a thriving granite and marble 
works near Calvary' Cemetery. Deputy Commissioner Goldner 
in 1885 resigned as School Commissioner, and on the first of 
January, 1886, he was appointed Under Sheriff by Sheriff John 
J. Mitchell, and held office three years. He succeeded Mitchell 



92 , 

as the Democratic candidate for Sheriff in 1888, and was elected 
over his Republican opponent, Theron H. Burden, by a hand- 
some majority. In 1892, shortly after the expiration of his term 
as Sheriff of the county, he was appointed City Clerk under the 
administration of Mayor Sanford. Deputy Commissioner Gold- 
ner is a man of rare business ability and enjoys the confidence 
of a large constituency. He is a member of the Democratic Club 
and of many local organizations and is an expert wheelman, 
and has always taken a foremost and active part in county and 
city politics. 

DEPARTMENT OF STREET CLEANING. 

The Commissioner of Street Cleaning has control of the 
sweeping and cleaning of the streets, the removal of ashes, street 
sweepings and garbage, the cleaning and removal of snow and 
ice from the leading thoroughfares, and the framing of regula- 
tions controlling the use of sidewalks and gutters for the disposal 
of sweepings, refuse, garbage and light rubbish. 

The control of the streets by this Department as described 
above includes all the public streets and thoroughfares of the 
City, except such streets as are within any park or are under con- 
trol and management of the Department of Parks, and also such 
wharves, piers and parts of streets which are under the control of 
the Department of Docks and Ferries. 

Under the provisions of the present Charter there has been 
practically no change prescribed as to the manner of conducting 
the Department, and while the Board of Public Improvements 
has the power to recommend to the Municipal Assembly all ordi- 
nances and resolutions regulating its matters, the Department 
itself is responsible for the manner in which it performs the work 
defined as described by law. 

That the Department under the present Commissioner has 
carried out its work faithfully it is only necessary to refer to the 
condition of the streets for verification. 

JAMES McCartney, 

STREET CLEANING COMMISSIONER. 

Clean streets will continue to be the rule in the Boroughs of 
Manhattan and The Bronx, and the many excellent innovations 



94 



by Col. George E. Waring will be extended to the Boroughs of 
Brooklyn, Queens and Richmond. 

That, at least, is the pledge made by James McCartney, who 
has been appointed by Mayor Van Wyck as head of the Street 
Cleaning Department, and in his conversation with a World 
reporter last night it was apparent that Mr. McCartney meant 
what he said. 

“ Every fair-minded man concedes that Col. Waring has done 
excellent work, and it will always be my honest endeavor to se- 
cure for the new administration the same praise that has been 
accorded the outgoing government for the condition of the 
streets. 

“ I am a Democrat, always have been and expect to so re- 
main. But in making appointments fitness and not politics will 
rule. Of course, where there are two men of equal ability and 
different political faith seeking the same place, I shall always 
give the Democrat the preference. That is only right. 

“ I have a high regard for my predecessor’s ability, yet I 
feel that with the same amount of money any Tammany appointee 
to the same place could have done as well. 

“ In comparing the administration of Col. Waring with that 
of his predecessors, people should bear in mind that former Street 
Cleaning Commissioners were sadly hampered by lack of funds. 
The great benefits of clean streets have been so clearly demon- 
strated that I am satisfied the present administration will not be 
in favor of any false economy.” 

Mr. McCartney is forty-six years of age and was born in the 
old Twenty-first Ward, on the east side. He was educated in 
the public schools, and while still in his teens entered the employ 
of the Hardman Piano Company. 

There he showed such capacity that at the age of twenty-two 
he was superintendent of the factory, and so remained there until 
appointed Superintendent of the Engineering Department of the 
Department of Public Works by Allen Campbell. 

Mr. IMcCartney was a great admirer of the late Hubert O. 
Thompson, and when Rollin M. Squire became Commissioner 
the office of Superintendent of Engineering was abolished. Mr. 
McCartney says it was done to get rid of him because of his 
friendship for Thompson. 

Mr. McCartney then became a builder and contractor, and 
has been very successful. He lives in a comfortable yet old- 



95 



fashioned house, at No. 1199 Fulton avenue, in the Annexed 
District. He is married and has several children. 

j\Ir. McCartney is quite a power in his trans-Harlem District, 
and is the successor of former County Clerk Purroy in the coun- 
cils of Tammany Hall. 

In his early years Mr. McCartney attained much prominence 
as an athlete. He was one of the best amateur oarsmen in the 
country and a remarkably good shot. 



F. M. GIBSON, 

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF STREET CLEANING. 

F. M. Gibson, Deputy Commissioner of Street Cleaning for 
the Borough of Manhattan, was born in Philadelphia, December, 
1847. He was educated there, but entered the United States 
Army when he was twenty, serving as Second Lieutenant in the 
Seventh Cavalry, of which the late General Custer was Colonel. 
Lieutenant Gibson was in all the Indian campaigns with his 
regiment, participating in the Battle of Washita, 1868, which 
settled for years the Indian troubles in the Indian Territory and 
Kansas. He also took part in the Battle of Big Horn where 
General Custer and many officers lost their lives. 

In 1877 he was on the staff of General Miles, now command- 
ing the United States Army. At the Battle of Bear Paw Moun- 
tain, where Chief Joseph, with his band of Nez-Perce Indians, 
were defeated and captured after a five days’ fight. 

After the regiment of which Lieutenant Gibson was a mem- 
ber was moved from Dakota to Kansas in 1887, he sustained a 
long period of illness, which resulted in his retirement from 
active service in December, 1891. In January, 1895, he entered 
the Department of Street Cleaning as Assistant Superintendent, 
and in May of that year was made Deputy Commissioner. It 
is almost needless to say that Commissioner Gibson is thoroughly 
qualified for the position he now fills. The life of a successful 
soldier is made up of experiences which would entitle him to fill 
a civil position demanding the same qualities. 

Lieutenant Gibson has demonstrated in his present position 
that he is just as good a civilian as he was a soldier. 



96 

PATRICK H. QUINN. 

Deputy Street Cleaxixg Commissioner Patrick H. 
Quinn, of the Borough of Brooklyn, was born in Ireland forty- 
five years ago, but when an infant came to this country with his 
parents, locating in Brooklyn, where he has resided for over 
forty-three years. He was educated in the public schools of that 
city and at the age of eighteen secured employment with the 
firm of Journeay & Burnham, one of the leading dry goods 
houses. Four years later he engaged in business for himself, 
embarking in the wholesale fish and oyster trade, in which he 
continued until his appointment to his present position. Mr. 
Quinn never held public office before, although he has been 
active in Democratic politics since he attained his majority. He 
has been a delegate to several State and local conventions, and 
is at present the executive member from the First As- 
sembly District to the Democratic Executive Committee. He 
is a member of the Constitution Club, one of the organizers of 
the Third Ward Young IMen's Democratic Club, was for several 
years President of the Third Ward Democratic Association and 
a delegate to the County Committee. He is also a member of 
Montauk Council Royal Arcanum, Montauk Council Knights of 
Columbus, and other fraternal orders. Mr. Quinn lives at No. 
84 Hoyt street. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF BRIDGES, 

The Department of Bridges was created under the provisions 
of the present Charter for the purpose of gathering under one 
head the control of bridges that have heretofore been distributed 
under several departments, trustees and commissions. 

This department, which has been established since January i 
of this year, now supervises, controls and manages over fifty 
important bridges in the city, and constructs bridges under one 
executive head, at an expense confined to one engineering de- 
partment, instead of several as 'heretofore. 

It has centralized the working force employed on the bridges, 
uniformed the employees, established rules and regulations for 
their conduct and management of the several draw-bridges, has 
opened to the public the Third Avenue Bridge, and made con- 
tracts for the construction of new bridges. 

The construction of new bridges over Newtown Creek, one 



97 



at Vernon avenue, at a cost of $700,000, and one at Greenpoint 
avenue, at a cost of $70,000. • The City Island Bridge, the One 
Hundred and Forty-fifth Street Bridge, the Willis Avenue 
Bridge, the One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Street Bridge and the 
One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Street Bridge. 

The most important work done by this Department is the 
change of contract made by the former Trustees of the New York 
and Brooklyn Bridge, whereby a change will be effected so that 
the City will continue to derive a surplus instead of a probable 
loss of over $600,000 per annum, which would be the case if the 
railroad companies were permitted to operate under the contracts 
of 1897. 

JOHN L. SHEA. 

John L. Shea, Commissioner of Bridges, was born about 
forty-five years ago in the City of New York. At an early age he 
attended the public schools in that section, and afterward, at his 
own request, took the full course of Paine’s Business College, 
when he laid the foundation of what has proved to be an ex- 
tremely successful business career. 

Upon leaving college he entered the employ of E. L. Garvin 
& Co., Custom House brokers, and a few years ago succeeded to 
the business. 

Mr. Shea is a business man to his finger tips, and while he 
does not believe in the so-called legitimate business tricks and 
schemes of competition which are so common nowadays, he does 
believe that the foundation of everything where finances come 
into play should rest upon strictly honest business principles. 

As executive head of the Bridge Commission — an entirely 
new department of the City Government created by the Charter — 
a department which demanded a business beginning, his appoint- 
ment to the place, therefore, was a most natural one. 

Apart from business Mr. Shea has always taken an active in- 
terest in the political welfare of his native city, and is credited 
with discovering more successful and fitting candidates for office 
than any other leader of his party in the Borough of Brooklyn. 
This Mr. Shea emphatically and modestly denies, but for all that 
it is a rt ^'^nized fact that politically, he has done more for others 
than he s for himself. This has given him a high standing 
among 1 Democratic colleagues in Brooklyn and in the busi- 
ness wor J, as well, where he is looked upon as a man who would 
sacrifice all rather than depart from his high standard. 



7 



98 

THOMAS H. YORK. 



Thomas H. York, Deputy Commissioner of Bridges, was 
born in the City of Brooklyn July I2, 1839, educated in the 
schools of Brooklyn, and on December 16, 1869, was admitted to 
the Bar as an attorney and counsellor-at-law. Up to the time of 
his appointment to the office he now holds he practiced law, in 
partnership with his brother, under the firm name of York & 
York, meeting with considerable success in the practice of his 
profession. 

Mr. York’s familiarity with corporation law, together with a 
fine business training and make-up, has made him a valuable city 
official, and one whose opinion on any subject he takes an interest 
in is worth having. 

Mr. York is an uncompromising, sterling Democrat — one of 
the kind who can always be depended upon when his party needs 
all the men of his stamp it can muster. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS, LIGHTING 
AND SUPPLIES. 

The Commissioner of Buildings, Lighting and Supplies has 
control of the construction, repairs, cleaning and maintenance 
of public buildings, except school-houses, almshouses, peniten- 
tiaries, fire-houses and police stations. He also has the power 
to make contracts to furnish the city or any part thereof with gas, 
electricity or any other illuminant, of the construction of electric 
mains, and the granting of the permission to open streets when 
approved by the Department of Highways. 

In addition to the above the Department has jurisdiction over 
the care and cleaning of all offices leased or occupied for public 
uses. Of the location, care and management and maintenance 
of the public baths, and of the purchase of fuel, furniture, utensils, 
books, and other articles needed for the public offices. 



HENRY S. KEARNY, 

COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS, LIGHTING AND SUPPLIES. 

Henry S. Kearny, who was appointed to the above office in 
January, this year, is a son of General Stephen Watts Kearny, of 
Mexican War fame. 



99 



Mr. Kearny, whose public and private record is a fine one, is 
a civil engineer by profession, and has practiced as such both here 
and in Colorado, in which State he was also elected State Senator, 
serving in that capacity from 1880 to 1884. 

Mr. Kearny’s experience as a civil engineer in this city was 
first gained in the Water Supply Department, where, as Assistant 
Engineer of the Croton Aqueduct, and later as Chief Engineer, he 
served for five years. 

In November, 1894, he was appointed a member of the Board 
of Electrical Control, having been engineer of the Board for six 
or seven years from the beginning of the construction of subway 
work. 

Mr. Kearny, besides being thoroughly familiar with the sub- 
ject of public lighting, is also a good executive officer. The light- 
ing of the public streets under the present charter is a more seri- 
ous problem than it has ever been in the history of the City Gov- 
ernment. In spite of this, however, Mr. Kearny has demon- 
strated that he knows the needs of the city in this direction, and 
the system he has in force when fully developed will give to each 
borough an adequate distribution of light. 



PETER J. DOOLING. 

Peter J. Dooling, Deputy Commissioner, Department of 
Buildings, Lighting and Supplies, was born in the City of 
New York in 1857, in that part of the Twenty-second Ward 
which is now embraced in the Thirteenth Assembly District. 

]\Ir. Dooling was educated in the public schools and early 
entered upon an active and successful business career. He 
represented the old Seventeenth Assembly District in the Board 
of Aldermen in 1891-92. Upon the redistricting of the city in 
1892 he was chosen the leader of the Tammany Hall organiza- 
tion in the new Seventeenth now Thirteenth. Under his leader- 
ship the district has become strongly Democratic, and in 1896 
the Committee undertook the erection of a handsome modern 
club-house at No. 315 West Eorty-second street. The successful 
completion of this undertaking was due entirely to Mr. Dooling’s 
efforts. It is now the home of the Tammany Committee and 
of the Tecumseh Club, the Tammany Hall Social organization 
of the District. 



100 



WILLIAM DALTON, 

COMMISSIONER OF WATER SUPPLY. 

\ViI!iani Dalton was born in New York City about forty-five 
years ago, beginning life in the Twentieth Ward, where he 
attended the public schools. 

After leaving school he learned the trade of a carpenter, but 
the advantages and opportunities offered to him in the butchers’ 
supply trade being more promising, he embarked in that trade, 
and in a few years became one of the proprietors of a large estab- 
lishment on AVYst Thirty-ninth street, doing business under the 
name of Halligan & Dalton. 

From the time he was able to think and do for himself, how- 
ever, a political career always had a fascination for him. His 
first political essay was in 1885, when he was elected a member 
of the State Legislature, serving as an Assemblyman from 1885 
to 1888. In 1889, under Hans Beattie, he was appointed Deputy 
Street Cleaning Commissioner, continuing in the same position 
under Commissioner Brennan until 1893, when Mayor Gilroy 
appointed him E.xcise Commissioner. He was afterward elected 
President of the Board. In all of the above positions Mr. Dalton 
displayed a fine executive ability, and left a good record behind 
him for the business way in which he disposed of the work under 
his direction. 

Mr. Dalton, who was born with the qualities from which 
leaders are made, became one, in fact, when he was made leader 
of the Fifteenth Assembly — now the Eleventh Assembly — Dis- 
trict. 

Mr. Dalton is popular both inside and outside the political 
atmosphere. He is a member of many clubs, the principal ones 
being the Democratic, Narragansett, Pequod and Heidenreich 
Rifles. In all of these organii^ations he counts his friends by the 
limit of the club membership only. 

THOMAS J. MULLIGAN. 

Thomas J. Mulligan, Deputy Commissioner of Water Sup- 
ply for the Borough of The Bronx, was born in Fallsburg, Nerv 
York, in 1852. 

Mr. Mulligan lived in his native town until he was eighteen, 
during which time he acquired a good school education and a 
capacity for work which was soon recognized by those for whom 



L 



lOI 



he was engaged. In 1876 he entered the employ of a well- 
known publishing house and remained with the concern until 
1898. During that time he had worked himself up to superin- 
tendent of the department of designing, engraving and printing, 
and made a fine name for himself in this capacity, a reputation 
which is extended throughout the printing and kindred trades as 
an expert and an authority in his field of work. 

Aside from his vocation, ]\Ir. Mulligan has taken an active 
interest in the aflairs of the community, and in the Village of 
Williamsbridge — previous to annexation — he organized the first 
Fire Department of the place, and was Chairman of the Town 
and County Committee of Westchester for four years. 

Mr. IMulligan was appointed to his present position in Janu- 
ary of this year, his experience and knowledge of municipal 
requirements making him peculiarly qualified for the office. 



JAMES MOFFETT. 

James Moffett, Deputy Commissioner of Water Supply for 
the Borough of Brooklyn, was born in that borough on the 3d 
day of January, 1853. He is a product of the public school 
system of the old City of Brooklyn, his only school education 
having been acqured at Public School No. i, corner Concord 
and Adams streets, in the said City of Brooklyn. 

At the age of twelve years he entered the law office of Messrs. 
Hagner & Smith, in that borough, at that time a leading firm, 
which has since gone out of existence, and remained with them 
until he was admitted to the Bar in December 17, 1874; upon his 
admission to the Bar he formed a business connection with Frank- 
lin W. Taber, which continued until May i, 1880. Mr. Moffett 
then retired and became the junior member of the law firm of 
G. F. Elliott & Moffett. On May i, 1886, Mr. Moffett formed 
the present law firm of Moffett & Kramer, establishing offices 
in the building now occupied by them at No. 894 Broadway, in 
the Borough of Brooklyn, the business of which has grown since 
then to probably the largest law practice in the borough. In 
the early part of Mr. Moffett’s practice at the Bar he was en- 
gaged quite extensively in criminal practice and participated in 
the defence of Alexander Jefferson, the Crow Hill murderer, a 
prominent case in the annals of crime in Kings County. The 
business of the firm of Moffett & Kramer having gradually 



102 



changed until now it is mainly real estate law and investment 
securities. 

Mr. Moffett is married, his wife being a daughter of the 
late John P. Elwell, of Brooklyn, and a niece of the late 
County Judge Henry A. Moore. He has two boys, his only 
children, who are students at the Delaware Academy, Delhi, 
New York. Mr. Moffett’s life has been an uneventful one, but 
he has taken an active interest in politics ever since he attained 
his majority, and always with the regular organization of the 
Democratic Party. He has been frequently sought after as a 
candidate for public offices, but has invariably declined to accept 
nominations. At the instance of a number of his friends, he 
consented to serve as Deputy Water Commissioner for the Bor- 
ough of Brooklyn, although his private business was sufficient 
to occupy the time of any one man. He has represented his 
neighborhood in all the conventions of the party, from the As- 
sembly Convention to the National Convention; he was a Dele- 
gate to the State Convention in 1892 that nominated Roswell 
B. Flower for Governor, and a Delegate to the National Con- 
vention at Chicago that nominated William J. Bryan in 1896. 
He was formerly Executive Committeeman of the Sixth Assem- 
bly District of Kings County, President of the Twenty-first Ward 
Democratic Association, Brooklyn, 1894, Vice-Chairman of the 
Democratic General Committee of Kings County in the year 
1895, and in 1897 was elected Chairman of the Kings County 
Democratic General Committee and re-elected again in 1898. 
Mr. Moffett was one of the two Delegates from the Borough of 
Brooklyn to the Provisional City Committee which arranged 
the Democratic City Convention for the nomination of the first 
Mayor of Greater New York in 1897, and, with Bernard J. York, 
represents the Borough of Brooklyn on the Democratic City 
Committee of the City of New York. 

Mr. Moffett’s collection of books is a large one, and apart 
from his Law Library, which is an extensive one, he has a private 
library at home of about two thousand volumes, which is con- 
stantly increasing. Mr. Moffett is one of the charter members 
of the Bushwick Club and was formerly its Vice-President; he 
is also a member of the Arion Singing Society, Zoellner Man- 
nerchor and Order of United Friends. 



103 



GEORGE \V. BIRDSALL. 

George W. Birdsall, Chief Engineer, Department of Water 
Supply, was born in New York in 1836. He was graduated in 
what is now known as the College of the City of New York, in 
J853, and the year following began his career as a civil engineer 
under the expert, E. H. Tracy. For the following fifteen years 
Mr. Birdsall’s work took him all over the country. In the ca- 
pacity of a surveyor for railroads he travelled extensively in the 
West and South, and returned to New York with an experience in 
and knowledge of his calling which has proved invaluable to him 
in the services he has since rendered the City. 

In 1871 Mr. Birdsall was appointed Assistant Engineer in the 
Department of Public Works. He remained in that capacity 
until 1879, when he was made Chief Engineer of the Department, 
which position he has held until this year, when it was abolished 
under the provisions of the present Charter. 

As Chief Engineer of the Department of Water Supply, Mr. 
Birdsall’s work not only requires the same supervision as his 
former duties demanded, but the increased territory of the bor- 
oughs has devolved upon him a wider field and a greater responsi- 
bility. So far he has been able to cope successfully wdth the con- 
ditions which have presented themselves, and with the aid of his 
assistants many improvements have already been effected. 

Mr. Birdsall is a Democrat in principle and practice — a gentle- 
man who believes that to control one’s self is a chief virtue. His 
success in life has demonstrated that he has been true to his faith. 



W. C. BYRNE, 

WATER REGISTER. 

W. C. Byrne, who is now the Water Register, was born in 
New York City about thirty-eight years ago. He attended the 
public schools long enough to acquire an education necessary to 
equip him for a commercial career, which he entered upon imme- 
diately after leaving school. 

Mr. Byrne displayed from the first a good business ability 
which, linked with a pleasing personality, made him a favorite 
with every one with whom he had business dealings. 

As one of the lieutenants of William Dalton, the Tammany 
leader of the Eleventh, now the Fifteenth Assembly District, he 
attracted attention by his good work as secretary of the district 



104 



organization, and this, together with his personal popularity and 
loyalty gave him a high standing in the best political circles, and 
entitled him to a position of trust and responsibility. 

Mr. Byrne was made Deputy Collector of City Revenue abour 
six years ago, and held that position continuously until January of 
this year, when Commissioner Dalton selected him for the impor- 
tant place he now fills. 

He is a member of the Democratic Club and the Tammany 
Society, and in both organizations, and in both organizations be- 
cause of his unassuming and courteous ways is a general all 
around favorite. 



JOSEPH FITCH. 

Joseph Fitch, Deputy Commissioner of Water Supply, 
Borough of Queens, was born in Flushing, L. I., August 27, 
1857, of Quaker parentage. His father was Joseph Fitch, also 
born in Flushing, F. I. 

He was educated at the Flushing Institute and gradu- 
ated from Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, in 1879. He 
studied law at the Columbia College Law School, and with 
Charles W. Pleasants, at No. 237 Broadway, New York, 
and was admitted to the Bar in February, 1882, and has 
been actively practicing ever since. Mr. Fitch was elected to the 
Assembly from the old First District of Queens County in 1885, 
and re-elected the following year, served on the Committee of 
Ways and Means the first year and the Committees on Cities and 
on Insurance the second year. He originated and passed the 
bill establishing the Coldspring Fish Hatchery in Queens 
County, which is the most important fish hatchery in the State. 
He was for a number of years a Director of the Flushing Bank, 
and was at one time a vestryman of St. George’s Church, Flush- 
ing. He has been for ten years on the Board of Governors of 
the Niantic Club of Flushing. 

Mr. Fitch was a member of the Board of Education of Flush- 
ing from 1893 until the Greater New York Charter expunged it 
by consolidation. He was Captain of the Nereus Rowing Club 
for two years, and Chairman of the Democratic Town Commit- 
tee for three years. Was Second Lieutenant of the Seventeenth 
Separate Company of Infantry, N. G., S. N. Y., from 1880 to 
1888. Was counsel to the Flushing Village Board of Health 
from its organization in 1891 until Greater New York arrived. 



105 



T 



Has been a member of Cornucopia Lodge, No. 563, F. & A. ]\I., 
for sixteen years. He ran on the Democratic ticket for Mem- 
ber of Congress in 1894, in the First New York District, Coun- 
ties of Queens and Suffolk, and was defeated, as most Demo- 
crats were, that year. 

He is a member of St. George’s Brotherhood, of the Queens 
County Bar Association, the New York Law Institute, the 
League of American Wheelmen and the Mercury Wheel Club of 
Flushing. In 1886 he was married to Miss Annie L. Rose, of 
Yonkers, and has two children, daughters, aged eight and six 
years. Mr. Fitch was sworn in as Deputy Commissioner of 
Water Supply for the Borough of Queens January 4, 1898, and is 
still serving in that capacity. 




LAW DEPARTMENT. 

JOHN WHALEN. 

John Whalen, the Corporation Counsel, has been specially 
favored as to the time and place of his birth, for he vas born 
on Independence Day, 1854, in the City of New York, and has 
lived here without a break ever since. 

He received his early education in St. John’s College, Ford- 
ham, and later completed his law studies in the University of the 
City of New York, where he took the degree of LL. B. He 
was admitted to the Bar in 1877, making a special study of real 
estate and corporation law. His knowledge of these subjects 
was so great that he soon became recognized as an authority, 
and was frequently selected by the Supreme Court Judges as a 
referee in important cases. 

His familiarity with real estate matters and municipal law led 
to his appointment by Mayor Gilroy as Tax Commissioner, to 
which position he devoted his best energies. He gave to the 
City a splendid, clean-cut, thorough administration, and left the 
office m'th a record on the books of the lowest tax-rate the city 
had known for twenty-five years. 

Mr. Whalen has been the examining counsel for the Lawyers’ 
Title and Guaranty Company and the Lawyers’ Surety Company. 
He is a member of the Bar Association, Manhattan Club, New 
York Athletic Club and the Catholic Club. 

Mr. Whalen is a fine type of a New Yorker, an American and 
a gentleman, respected for his abilities and esteemed for his 
modest, manly qualities. 



THEODORE CONNOLY, 

ASSISTANT CORPORATION COUNSEL. 

Theodore Connoly was born in New Orleans, but re- 
moved at an early age to this city, where he has spent most of 
his life. 

He was educated in France, where he resided about nine 
years, graduating at the Lycee in Tours, with a relative rank of 






Charles I^la.vdv. 



John Whalen 



Theodore Connoly. 



Al.met F. 



io8 



third out of five hundred. He was admitted to the Bar of New 
York in 1872. 

Since then Mr. Connoly’s connection with the law has been an 
exceedingly active one. In addition to his practice he has writ- 
ten and compiled considerable literature upon the practice of 
his profession. As legal editor of the New York Laiu Journal 
for about three years, he displayed such fine ability and knowl- 
edge of corporation law that he is now considered one of the 
authorities on the subject in the city. 

Mr. Connoly is the author of “ New York Citations,” 2 vols. ; 
Editor of ” New York Criminal Reports,” 8 vols., and “ Sur- 
rogate’s Reports,” 2 vols. 

He was appointed Assistant Corporation Counsel February 
I, 1891, First Assistant Corporation Counsel, January i, 1898. 



CHARFES BFANDY, 

ASSIST.^NT CORPORATION COUNSEL. 

The subject of this sketch was born on August 18, 1848, at 
Knock, County Clare, Ireland, of Protestant English parents, 
while they were sojourning there, his father being in charge of 
important government interests in that locality. At an early 
age he removed to Worcester, England, where he entered upon 
his early education at the public schools, and at the Worcester 
College, and from there the family removed to Manchester, 
where he completed his education at public school, at Owen’s 
College and at private tuition. At the age of sixteen he was arti- 
cled to a Manchester solicitor for the purpose of becoming a 
solicitor. The law required that an articled clerk should serve 
not less than three years, and the solicitor in turn obligates him- 
self to “ teach and instruct, or cause to be taught and instructed ” 
the student, and for this service the solicitor is usually paid a very 
large premium. In this case he was paid by Mr. Blandy’s pa- 
rents f6oo, or $3,000. Before the articles expired financial mis- 
fortune overtook the solicitor, who absconded, and all the money 
paid, as well as the time spent, became lost, and Mr. Blandy be- 
ing one of nine children, did not feel that he could again draw 
upon the family patrimony for an additional premium, and while 
looking around for an opportunity to locate himself, visited this 
country and determined to make it his future home. In 1867 he 
entered upon the study of the law in New York City. In 1872 



109 



he was admitted to the bar at general term, and at once plunged 
into active practice. 

In 1882 he attracted the attention of the Hon. William C. 
Whitney, then Corporation Counsel — since Secretary of the 
Navy under Cleveland — in the trial of a complicated false impris- 
onment and malicious prosecution case brought against certain 
members of the police force, which aroused considerable interest 
at the time, and which Mr. Whitney, in person, with several of 
his assistants, was defending for the Police Department. At the 
conclusion of the trial Mr. Whitney invited Mr. Blandy to be- 
come one of his assistants to try jury cases, and in 1882 he ac- 
cepted office and held it during all of Mr. Whitney’s term, as well 
as that of his successor, afterwards Judge George P. Andrews. 
In 1890 the Hon. William H. Clark became Corporation Counsel 
and he selected Mr. Blandy as second assistant, to try the im- 
portant jury cases and to take charge of Dock Department mat- 
ters, and later on he entrusted to his care the prospective legis- 
lation affecting the city’s interests. 

When the Hon. John Whalen became Corporation Counsel 
Mr. Blandy was one of the first to be selected as one of his 
assistants, on January i, 1898, to take charge of the vast volume 
of litigations aff’ecting the City of New York, until they eventuate 
in judgment or are appealed, when they pass into other hands to 
be cared for. 

In all the public positions held by Mr. Blandy he has been a 
most conscientious, courteous public servant. Exemplary in all 
his habits, most industrious, and a formidable foe in Court, and 
he is regarded by the bench and bar as a well-equipped all- 
around lawyer. 



ALMET FRANCIS JENKS. 

Almet Francis Jenks, born in Brooklyn, 1853. Prepared 
for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. Graduated at 
Yale College 1875, and at Columbia Law School 1877. Admit- 
ted to the Bar in 1877; Assistant District Attorney of Kings 
County 1884. Resigned and appointed Corporation Counsel of 
Brooklyn in 1886. Served four successive terms until 1894. 
Member of the Constitutional Convention of 1895 and of the 
Judiciary Committee. Judge Advocate General of the State of 
New York, appointed by Governor Hill and reappointed by 



I lO 



Governor Flower. Permanent Chairman of the First City Con- 
vention of the Democratic Party of the City of New York. 

Appointed Assistant Corporation Counsel of the City of New 
York in charge of the Boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens and Rich- 
mond, January i, 1898. Married Miss Lenore Barre, 1891; has 
two children; resides at No. 147 Joralemon street, Brooklyn. 
Member of the Brooklyn, Hamilton, Crescent, Riding and Driv- 
ing, Dyker Meadow Clubs, and of the Society of Colonial Wars. 



WILLIAM W. LADD, Jr. 

William W. Ladd, Jr., was born in 
Westchester, Westchester County, New 
York, in the year 1852. 

In 1869 he entered the Law School of 
Columbia College, from which he gradu- 
ated in the Class of 1871, receiving the 
degree of LL. B. with “ especial honor,” 
and taking the first of the prizes open to 
the graduating class. 

In 1873, on attaining his majority, he 
commenced the practice of law ip this 
city, which he continued alone and in as- 
sociation with Mr. Edward G. Black until June, 1885, when he 
was appointed Deputy Chamberlain of the City of New York, an 
office which he held under successive Chamberlains till June, 
1890, when he resigned and resumed the practice of law. 

For several years he edited the series of “American Railway 
Reports,” and later the series of “American Probate Reports.” 

He has held the position of Assistant Judge Advocate Gen- 
eral of the State from 1887 to 1888, and from 1891 to 1898, and 
has been connected with the most important cases in military law 
occurring in this State in that period. In 1897 he was appointed 
a member of the Board which prepared the Military Code adopted 
by the Legislature in 1898. Under this act he was appointed to 
the position of Judge Advocate on the Staff of the Commanding 
Officer of the National Guard. 

On January i, 1898. he was appointed Assistant Corporation 
Counsel of the City of New York. 




Ill 



JOHN P. DUNN. 



John P. Dunn, Assistant to Corporation Counsel, in cliarge 
of the Bureau of Street Openings, was born in this city in iS6o. 
Mr. Dunn graduated from Columbia College Law School in 1S85 
and was admitted to the Bar in 1887. In 1889 he was made an 
Assistant Corporation Counsel. 

He organized the Bureau of Street Openings in the Law De- 
partment in 1893 and has been in charge of this Bureau since. 
The Bureau of Street Openings is one of the Departments of 
the City Government where a large volume of executive, legal 
and clerical work is daily transacted. 

The systematic and thorough manner in which this Bureau 
has been conducted since its inception leaves no room for doubt 
as to the legal and business ability of its head. 

Mr. Dunn, who is a man of fine presence and of an enthusiastic 
nature, impresses his personality on all his lieutenants and co- 
workers, and the result is that the Bureau of Street Openings is 
managed with an activity and snap that might well be taken as 
a model for a first class business house. 




I 



DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES. 

JOHN W. KELLER. 

John W. Keller, President of the Charities Board, was born 
in Kentucky, July 5, 1856. He was educated at Yale College, 
where he was a member of the university crew and was promi- 
nent in athletic sports. While at college Mr. Keller founded the 
Yale Nezvs, which was the first daily college paper in this country. 
In the fall of 1879 Mr. Keller came to this city and entered upon 
his newspaper career, the early stages of which were stormy. He 
did hard and effective work, among other things exposing the 
old Sixth avenue dives, which caused him to be attacked by a 
number of thugs on Sixth avenue. 

The attack cost him the sight of one eye. When he recov- 
ered he became the editor of the Dramatic News, and later did 
special work for the daily papers until he joined the staff of the 
New York Times. He has written a number of plays. He was 
the managing editor of the Recorder while it was in existence, 
and afterward went on the Journal. He was twice President of 
the Press Club. Mr. Keller joined Tammany Hall a few years 
ago and became one of its popular speakers. He presided at the 
meeting in Tammany Hall at which William J. Bryan first ap- 
peared there in the National Campaign of 1896, and he was 
Chairman of the last Count\- Convention. Mr. Keller is a mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee of Tammany Hall and is Chair- 
man of the Committee on Printing. 

THOMAS S. BRENNAN. 

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF CHARITIES. 

Thomas S. Brennan, born in Bloomingdale, this city, in 
July, 1844. The eldest son of Patrick Brennan, a prosperous 
coal merchant at that period. Mr. Brennan attended school at 
Public School No. 9, then at St. Francis Xavier and Manhattan 
Colleges, this city, and from there was sent to St. Therese Col- 
lege, near Montreal, Canada, where he graduated at the age of 
sixteen. He then returned to New York, and was made Captain 



IM 



of the Watchmen in Bellevue Hospital. His faithful services 
were rewarded by his promotion to Night Store-keeper ami 
Clerk, and then Steward and Deputy Warden in Charity Hos- 
pital. 

In 1866 he was appointed Warden of Bellevue, and while 
.serving in that capacity started the present ambulance system, 
invented the fracture bed and head-rest, all great aids to surgery. 
He also had charge of Ninety-ninth street and Centre street Re- 
ception Hospitals. 

In January, 1875, he was appointed Commissioner of Public 
Charities and Correction by Mayor Wickham, and was re-ap- 
pointed twice to fill his own vacancy. He w'as President of the 
Board for several terms. In 1893 Mayor Grant appointed him 
Street Cleaning Commissioner, which position he held for one 
year, wdien he resigned and w'ent into the real estate business. 
On January i, 1898, he was appointed by Hon. John W. Keller 
to fill the new position of Deputy Commissioner of Public Chari- 
ties for Manhattan and The Bronx. 

Mr. Brennan is one of the pleasantest men to meet connected 
wdth the new City Government. Unassuming and reposeful, 
with the bearing of a man who demands respect, commands con- 
fidence, wins and holds friends. 

A. SIMIS, Jr. 

A. SiMis, Jr., was born in Hamburg, Germany. He reached 
this country while very young. Received a public school edu- 
cation, and, upon graduation therefrom, entered the U. S. Navy 
in 1862 as a boy, and remained therein until after the close of 
the war, when he went to Kansas where he received a nomination 
as a State Senator from the Democratic Party, he being then but 
twenty-fours years of age. In 1874 he returned to New York, 
entered the law school of Columbia College, graduated there- 
from in 1876, and has practised his profession ever since. 

From 1882 to 1886 he was Counsel for the Commissioners of 
Charities and Correction of Kings County. In 1892 he was 
appointed a Commissioner of said Department to fill out the 
unexpired term of Hon. Francis Nolan, deceased, and on January 
I, 1893, was reappointed for a term of four years, and on January 
I, 1898, was appointed by Mayor Van Wyck as a Commissioner 
of Charities for the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens of the 
Greater New York. 



115 



Mr. Simis is one of the prominent and successful lawyers of 
Brooklyn and has been identified as the leading attorney in many 
of the most important cases of litigation in that city. He has 
done splendid executive work for the Brooklyn Department of 
Charities, and has succeeded in placing the machinery of his 
office on such a fine business basis that to-day it ranks as a model 
bureau of its kind in official circles. He was instrumental in 
the framing of all laws relating to his Department since 1882, 
and is not only an authority on this branch of our City Govern- 
ment, but has made himself conversant with the general munici- 
pal system. 

Personally, Mr. Simis is a clean-cut gentleman, possessing 
marked social characteristics which never desert him no matter 
what the occasion is or with whom he comes in contact. He is 
a well-known Veteran of the Civil War, prominent in U. S. Grant 
Post, G. A. R., and a member of many clubs. 

JAMES FEENY. 

James Feeny, Commissioner of Charities for the Borough of 
Richmond, is the eldest son of the late Dr. Joseph Feeny, who 
settled on Staten Island about 1840. In 1849 father opened 
the first drug-store on Staten Island. 

In 1864 Dr. Joseph Feeny removed to Jersey City and the 
following year was appointed Health Officer of the city, holding 
the office at the time of his death, which occurred in 1866. 

In 1863 Mr. Feeny succeeded to his father’s business, and 
from that time devoted himself entirely to the practice of his 
profession. 

Mr. Feeny has continued in business and has never sought 
for or held office until he was appointed to his present position 
by the Mayor of New York. 

CHARLES A. ALDEN. 

Charles A. Alden, who was appointed as private secretary 
by Hon. John W. Keller, President of the Department of Pub- 
lic Charities, was born at Hoosick Falls, N. Y., on April 16, 
1871. 

His father. Dr. Edwin P. Alden, who is the brother of Dr. 
Henry M. Alden, of Harper's Magazine, so widely known as both 
editor and author, was an honored and respected citizen of this 



ii6 



place, in which he had spent nearly all his life, and had secured 
an enviable reputation in the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion of dentistry. His mother, Martha Andrews Alden, is the 
sister of E. Benjamin Andrews, President of Brown University, 
and of Hon. Charles B. Andrews, ex-Governor and present 
Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court of Connecticut. 

Mr. Alden was graduated as the valedictorian of the Class of 
’89, of the Hoosick Falls High School, after which he spent one 
year at Colgate Academy, and at the close of that year became 
a settled pastor at the age of nineteen, was ordained on the 23d 
of April, 1892, and remained in the active ministry until Sep- 
tember, 1896, when he resigned the pastorate of a flourishing 
church in Schenectady, N. Y., to become an active participant 
in the struggle for the Chicago Platform. 

Mr. Alden was one of Tammany Hall’s large corps of able 
speakers during the last municipal campaign, and at the begin- 
ning of this year he accepted the position which he now occu- 
pies, as private secretary to President Keller. 



ARTHUR A. QUINN. 

Arthur A. Quinn, Deputy Commissioner of Charities for 
the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, was born in the city 
about forty years ago. He attended the public schools and after- 
wards took a course in the higher branches, devoting his studies 
largely to mathematics and a practical reading of Civil Govern- 
ment. Thus equipped, after a short term as a Clerk in the 
Department of Assessments, he entered the real estate business 
and was successful. 

The desire, however, to acquire a more practical education in 
a field more to his taste prompted him to enter the employ of 
J. B. Crimmins, where he made the most of his opportunities, 
and at the end of four years, being thoroughly qualified, he 
accepted the position of City Surveyor and Civil Engineer. He 
remained in the above capacity six years, displaying a good 
executive ability and a general knowledge of municipal affairs 
which stamped him as a man worthy of an important place in the 
government of Greater New York. 

Mr. Quinn’s duties as Commissioner of Charities brings him 
in touch with the active detail work of the Department. He has 
shown the same capacity in this office as he has in the others he 
has filled for the City. Every case for public charity is thor- 



117 



oughly investigated and treated according to its merits. The 
cases that come before the Brooklyn Department which are out- 
side the jurisdiction of the City, but which at the same time 
receive relief are numerous. Enough of these have been made 
public to show that Mr. Quinn’s administration of his office is 
not a cold-blooded one. 

J. McKEE BORDEN, 

SECRETARY, DEP’ARTMENT OF CHARITIES. 

J. McKee Borden was born in Jack- 
son County, Texas, of native American 
parents. Lived in Texas, Louisiana and 
Missouri until entering Cornell University 
at Ithaca, N. Y., from which College he 
graduated in the Class of ’78. After leav- 
ing College Mr. Borden accepted a re- 
sponsible Government position which he 
resigned to accept his present position as 
Secretary to the Department of Public 
Charities. In politics he has always been 
a Democrat. He is a member of Tammany Hall and the Demo- 
cratic Club. 







i 

i 




THE EQUIPMENT OF THE NEW YORK 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

In the Borough of Manhattan the Phre Department has nine 
double Engine Companies and one double Hook and Ladder 
Company, consisting of two complete sets of apparatus and 
men, which system, in the course of time, will be extended by 
Chief Bonner to the other boroughs. The object of the double 
companies is to have one section in their own quarters and the 
other section used to cover quarters of other companies left va- 
cant during the absence of a large number of companies at fires 
in different parts of the city. 

There are also three (3) water towers in service in the Bor- 
ough of Manhattan, one in the lower, one in the centre, and one 
in the upper sections of the city. This apparatus will also be 
extended to the other boroughs m the course of time. 

There are also four fire-boats in the Borough of Manhattan, 
and two fire-boats in the Borough of Brooklyn. These boats 
respond to alarms for fires on the shores or in the vicinity of the 
shores in each borough, and cover a river front in all the terri- 
tory of more than 80 miles, included in which are the shore 
fronts of the Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx, Brooklyn, 
Queens and Richmond, and of Blackwell’s, Ward's, Randall’s, 
Hart’s and City Islands. 

The Fire Departments in the various boroughs consist of a 
total of: In Manhattan and The Bronx, 1,200 officers and men; 
Brooklyn and Queens, 1,000 officers and men, and in the subur- 
ban boroughs, about 2,000 volunteer firemen, with apparatus, 
are in active service, and will remain so until the extension of 
the paid system in those districts, which will take place when 
the growth of those outlying districts warrant it. 

The average number of fires in the Boroughs of Manhattan 
and The Bronx is about 4,000 annually, and in the Boroughs of 
Brooklyn and Queens, about 2,000 annually. 

The difference between the New York (former city) Fire 
Department and other Fire Departments, is the system by which 
the city is covered in cases of large fires. Each company is as- 
signed to respond, in a systematic manner, and in regular order 




James H. Tully, 

Deputy Commissioner ^ Fire Department, 



120 



as to distance, in covering parts of the city left uncovered, and 
one of the sections of each of the double companies, and other 
designated companies, are held in reserve and assigned to cover 
such of the territory as is left uncovered by the absence of com- 
panies at other fires. 

. JOHN J. SCANNELL, 

COMMISSIONER, FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

John J. Scannell, who now fills the position of Fire Com- 
missioner for the third time, was born in New York City in 1840. 
He was given a good school education and afterward finished 
his instruction under a private tutor, who predicted for his pupil 
a successful career. 

Mr.' Scannell has fulfilled his teacher’s prediction. A natural 
capacity for business, combined with an aggressive make up and 
a broad, generous way of viewing everything has resulted in Mr. 
Scannell trying fortune at various vocations, in nearly all of 
which he has been successful. 

When the old Madison Square Garden was in its prime, Mr. 
Scannell leased it and there gave some brilliant concerts, the 
music being under the leadership of the late Patrick Gilmore. 
He also started international walking matches on a large scale, 
which, for a number of years, were the talk of the town. 

From amusement enterprises Mr. Scannell drifted into the 
horse business, and in 1877-78, with his partner, Michael Mc- 
Laughlin, did a large export trade, shipping considerable horse 
flesh to Europe. 

Mr. Scannell made his entrance into politics at the time the 
Tweed Government was at the height of its power. 

Since that time he has seen and helped to make considerable 
political history in this city. As the Tammany Hall leader of the 
Twenty-fifth District he has shown splendid executive ability in 
strengthening the vote of his party in an uncertain and unsettled 
section of the city. 

He was first appointed Fire Commissioner by ex-Mayor 
Gilroy, and after acting as Treasurer of the Fire Board until 
May, 1893, was reappointed for a full term of six years and 
elected President of the Board. 

Commissioner Scannell has infused into the Fire Department 
a fine business system, and which, with the assistance of his 
staff, has made this bureau, one of the City departments, a pleas- 



I2I 



ant place to transact business or seek information. He has al- 
ways been readily appreciative of the work of the active firemen, 
and has, by his counsel and co-operation with the Chief of the 
Department, been a large factor in helping to elevate the per- 
sonnel and esprit dii corps of the men who fight fires and save 
lives and property. 

It is almost needless to say that the New York Fire Depart- 
ment is the finest in the world. Commissioner Scannell’s part 
in raising the Department to its present standard is known to 
every one who has followed its history. 



HUGH BONNER, 

CHIEF OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

A fireman’s work is not on paper or books that no one but 
himself sees. It is open to inspection for the public at all times. 
In all the forty years Chief Bonner has been before the public 
as a fire fighter there is not one serious criticism of his work on 
record. 

Briefly, Mr. Bonner’s career is as follows : He was born in 
Ireland June 14, 1839. 1853, when only seventeen years old, 

he joined the Volunteers and ran with the Lady Washington 
Engine Company No. 40. In 1861 he was made Assistant Fore- 
man of the Company. In 1863 he became its Foreman and re- 
mained in that capacity until 1865 when he was appointed Fore- 
man of Engine Company No. 20. On May 21, 1873, Mr. Bonner 
was promoted to be a Chief of Battalion, and was assigned to 
the Second District, in which are located many of the large dry 
goods and other mercantile houses. For ten years he held this 
position, and the system which he established for the protection 
of the property under him is not only on record in the annals of 
the Fire Department but is also a matter of personal recollection 
among the heads of the houses in the district. 

On May i, 1884, Mr. Bonner was made Assistant Chief of 
the Department, and on May 22, 1889, on the retirement of Chief 
Charles O. Shay, he was promoted to Chief of the Department. 
When the new Charter took effect in January of this year, Mr. 
Bonner was given additional honors by being assigned and 
appointed as Chief of the Fire Department for the greater city, 
comprising the Boroughs of Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, 
Queens and Richmond. 



The above are only the bare facts connected with the career 
of Chief Bonner. The records of the Fire Department credit 
him with many a deed of heroism, of property and lives saved 
largely by his own personal efforts and sacrifice. There are 
more that are not on record that could be traced if the Chief 
chose to speak, but he will not, for he is like all brave men — 
manly and modest. But this is not all — the organization and 
personnel of the New York Fire Department is of the finest. 
Politics have no place in it, and the requirements of the Chief 
for the higher efficiency from the lowest subordinate has made 
his department the model one of its kind in this or any other 
country. 



JAMES H. TULLY, 

DEPUTY FIRE COMMISSIONER, BROOKLYN AND QUEENS. 

James H. Tully, born in Ireland November 15, 1850, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of Brooklyn and St. 
Mneent’s Academy, was appointed Clerk in the office of the 
City Clerk of Brooklyn in January, 1873; was made Deputy City 
Clerk in January, 1S80. On the expiration of his term, two years 
later, he accepted the position of Manager of the business of 
O’Keefe & Doyle, who were the Long Island representatives of 
the Albany Company, and remained there until July, 1888, when 
he was. elected Assistant Secretary of the Board of Education of 
Brooklyn, and annually re-elected as such until his appointment 
as Deputy Fire Commissioner for the Boroughs of Brooklyn and 
Queens. He is a member of the Kings County Democratic 
General Committee; President of the Seymour Club, and is con- 
nected with the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick and other social 
organizations. 



AUGUSTUS T. DOCHARTY. 

Augustus T. Docharty, Secretary of the Fire Department, 
according to his own statement, is “ a New Yorker by birth and 
choice.” He is a son of the late Professor Docharty, who was 
professor of mathematics in the College of the City of New 
York over thirty-five years. 

The foundation of Mr. Docharty’s education was laid in the 
public schools of the city and afterwards completed in the Col- 
lege of the City of New York. As a boy he was a leader among 



his companions, his athletic qualifications placing him in the lead 
in all out-door sports. This early training built up a wonderful 
constitution for him, and to-day he gives evidence of it in his 
vigorous manhood. 

Before he attained his majority he was appointed Clerk in 
the Comptroller’s Office. In 1872 he was Assistant Secretary 
of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment. This office he 
held until 1875, when he was appointed Contract Clerk of the 
Department of Public Works. 

In 1877 Mr. Docharty was made Deputy Register of the City 
and County of New York. He held this position until 1880, 
when he was elected, for the full term of three years. Register. 

In 1889 he was requested to take the Secretaryship of the 
Dock Department, which office he accepted and held with 
marked ability until the accession of the “ Reform ” administra- 
tion necessitated his retirement. 

Mr. Docharty is an active member of the New York Athletic 
Club since 1883. He was twice elected Secretary, and, in 1894, 
a Governor for two years. He is also a member of the Demo- 
cratic Club, the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick and a life member 
of the American Geographical Society. Mr. Docharty is an 
active member of Tammany Hall and a member of the Tam- 
many Society, or which he held the dignified office of Scribe of 
the Council of Sachems from 1876 to 1884. 

He is a man once met always remembered, because of his 
affable, manly, sincere qualities. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS. 



To preserve and protect public health and safety, the enforce- 
ment of rules and regulations as regards structural strength and 
sanitary conditions are necessary in the construction and altera- 
tion of buildings. The Department of Buildings is charged 
with the duty of seeing that the building laws are faithfully 
observed. 

The report of the Department for the first six months of this 
year, which is too voluminous to be repeated here, will show 
exactly what the Department has accomplished this year, but 
during the first six months of 1898 plans were filed and acted on 
as follows : 

New buildings $48,024,952 

Alterations 4,449,339 



Prior to 1898 the head of the Department of Buildings in the 
City of New York was designated as Superintendent. Under 
the Charter the head of the Department of Buildings of the Citv 
of New York, as at present constituted, is the Board of Buildings, 
which consists of three Commissioners; one having adminis- 
trative jurisdiction in the Boroughs of Manhattan and The 
Bronx, one in the Borough of Brooklyn and one in the Boroughs 
of Queens and Richmond. 

The reputation of the Department of Buildings in the Bor- 
oughs of Manhattan and The Bronx is international. It was 
organized in 1892 by Thomas J. Brady, the present Commis- 
sioner, who was then Superintendent. The greater part of the 
present New York Building Laws was prepared under his 
immediate direction, and they have since served as a model to 
many building departments, not only in this country but abroad, 
the language in many cases being copied verbatim. 

Commissioner John Guilfoyle, who has administrative juris- 
diction in the Borough of Brooklyn since January i, has been 
for years a prominent builder in Brooklyn, and his administration, 
as was his appointment, is regarded with satisfaction by the 
building trades. 




jbomas j. 






126 



In the Boroughs of Queens and Richmond, where hitherto no 
building regulations worthy of the name have existed, Commis- 
sioner Daniel Campbell has successfully accomplished the difficult 
task of organizing and conducting a department, which, while 
securing a proper enforcement of the building laws, must at the 
same time not operate too restrictively in a district whose condi- 
tions are vastly different from those of the Borough of Manhat- 
tan, although operating under the same laws. 

THOMAS J. BRADY, 

PRESIDENT DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS. 

Thomas J. Brady, President of the Board of Buildings, is a 
fine example of a self-made man. Mr. Brady was born in New 
York City in 1854, and was left an orphan at the age of seven. 
Since that time, with the exception of a few years (during which 
time he had a hard struggle to keep on top), he has been con- 
nected with the building trade in New York City. 

In January, 1870, Mr. Brady was a bricklayer’s apprentice. 
In January, 1898, Mr. Brady was appointed Commissioner of 
Buildings for the Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx, and 
President of the Board of Buildings. In the years intervening 
Mr. Brady earned the right to be the official authority he now is 
in the City’s Building Department. In January, 1884, he be- 
came an Inspector in the Fire Department of the City of New 
York. October, 1887, he was made First Deputy of the Bureau 
of Inspection of Buildings in the Fire Department. April i, 
1889, he was made Superintendent of Buildings of the Bureau of 
Inspection of Buildings in the Fire Department. In 1892 the 
Legislature passed a bill organizing the Department of Buildings 
by combining the Bureau of Inspection of Buildings of the Fire 
Department and the Plumbing Bureau of the Health Depart- 
ment, and Mr. Brady was the first Superintendent of the new 
department organized. June i, 1892, the Department of Build- 
ings was finally organized and opened to the public. Mr. Brady 
was Superintendent until March 26, 1895, when he went into 
business as a builder and general contractor. 

Among the operations conducted by Mr. Brady during the 
above period may be mentioned the Hebrew Technical Institute, 
San Remo Hotel, a fine example of modern hotel building, the 
Central Mills and Grain Elevator, and many country residences 
and commercial buildings. 



127 



Mr. Brady has the reputation of being one of the most thor- 
ough and practical builders in New York City. His social, 
political and financial reputation is just as high. He is a mem- 
ber of the Catholic, Pontiac, Democratic, Builders’ League, Nar- 
raganset and Engineers’ Clubs. 

In all of the above associations he is looked upon with confi- 
dence and esteem. By the business public he is regarded as an 
authority in his walk in life, and he commands the respect and ad- 
miration of all with whom he has had dealings. 

ALFRED J. JOHNSON. 

Alfred J. Johnson, Secretary to the Board of Buildings of 
the Department of Buildings of The City of New York, was born 
in the City of Brooklyn in 1869. After leaving school he ob- 
tained employment as a clerk in a school of stenography, where 
he studied stenography and typewriting. Subsequently he be- 
came sufficiently competent to enter the employment of a large 
importing house. 

In 1886 Hon. Hugh J. Grant, then Sheriff, appointed him 
private secretary. When Mr. Grant was elected Mayor Mr. 
Johnson was transferred to the Mayor’s Office in a similar capac- 
ity, and he remained there during the four years of his adminis- 
tration. Shortly after Mr. Johnson resigned to engage in private 
business. 

When Mayor Van Wyck was placed in nomination for Mayor 
Mr. Johnson was sent for because of his experience in campaign 
work, and was placed in charge of an important part of the 
canvass. 

On January i Mr. Johnson was appointed Secretary to the 
Board of Buildings. The Board of Buildings consists of the 
three Commissioners of Buildings; one having administrative 
jurisdiction in the Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx, one 
in the Borough of Brooklyn and one in the Boroughs of Queens 
and Richmond. 



DANIEL CAMPBELL. 

Daniel Campbell, Commissioner of Buildings for the Bor- 
oughs of Queens and Richmond, was born in the City of New 
York July 12, 1851, and moved to Staten Island with his parents 
in infancy. 



128 



He attended the public school at West New Brighton until 
he was ten years old; he then started to work for the New York 
Printing and Dyeing Company. 

He remained with this firm until he was fifteen years of age, 
when he began to learn the carpenter’s trade. By close attention 
to the business and diligent study at home he advanced rapidly 
and at the age of thirty he started in business on his own account 
as builder, contractor and superintendent. He has been very 
successful. 

During the past fifteen years he has built many of the largest 
houses and business buildings on Staten Island, besides doing 
an extensive business in New Jersey. 

Mr. Campbell has served as Supervisor of the Town of 
Castleton, President of the Board of Health of the Village of 
New Brighton, and as trustee of School District No. 2 , Town of 
Castleton. 

Mr. Campbell is emphatically a self-made man, is thoroughly 
skilled in all branches of the building trade, a man of push and 
energy, and will make a thorough and competent Commissioner 
of Buildings. 





PARK SYSTEM-BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN, 



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PARK SYSTEM— BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN. 



THE PARK SYSTEM OF GREATER NEW 
YORK. 



The park system of Greater New York now embraces in the 
neighborhood of 7,030 acres. This acreage is divided among the 
different boroughs about as follows: 



Borough of Manhattan 1.393 acres. 

Borough of The Bronx 4.025 acres. 

Borough of Brooklyn 1.512 acres. 

Borough of Queens 100 acres. 



7,030 acres. 

In addition to the above there are several parks in the Bor- 
ough of Richmond which at present are unimproved or only 
partially improved. 

Central Park, in the Borough of jManhattan, which is the 
largest single park in the borough, contains 840 acres. Prospect 
Park, in Brooklyn, the largest and finest park in that borough, 
contains 516 acres. Among the other parks of importance in the 
Borough of Manhattan are: 

Battery Park, 21 acres; Bryant Park, 5 acres; City Hall Park, 
8 acres; Corlears Hook, 8 acres; East River, 13 acres; Fort Wash- 
ington, 41 acres; High Bridge, 43 acres; -Madison Square, 7 
acres; Morningside, 31 acres; Mount IMorris, 20 acres; Riverside 
Park and Riverside Drive, 178 acres; Stuyvesant Square, 4 acres; 
Tompkins Square, ii acres; Union Square, 4 acres, and Wash- 
ington Square, 8 acres. 

The park system of Brooklyn is, in addition to Prospect Park, 
made up of the following parks: Washington Park, 30 acres; 

Bedford Park, 4 acres; Tompkins Park, 8 acres; City Park, 8 
acres; Winthrop Park, 7 acres; Ridgewood Park, 26 acres; Sun- 
set Park, 14 acres; Red Hook Park, 6 acres; Bushwick Park, 
6 acres; East Side Lands, 50 acres; Parade Ground, 40 acres; 
Concourse Park, 70 acres; Dyker Beach Park, 144 acres; Benson- 
hurst Park, 8 acres; Lincoln Terrace, 12 acres; Canarsie Beach, 
40 acres; New Lots Playground, 6 acres; Cooper Park, 10 acres; 
Irving Square, 6 acres; Saratoga Square, 7 acres; Linton Park, 
6 acres, and Brooklyn Forest, 535 acres. 



9 



130 

The parks now embraced within the Borough of The Bronx 
are: Bronx Park, 662 acres; Pelham Bay Park, 1,756 acres; Van 
Cortlandt Park, 1,132 acres; Crotona Park, 154 acres; Cedar 
Park, 18 acres; Cromwell’s Creek, 27 acres; Claremont Park, 38 
acres, and St. Mary’s Park, 29 acres. In addition to the above 
there are a number of recently acquired parks none of which have 
as yet been turned over to the Park Department. When com- 
pleted the present Park Commission will maintain beautiful little 
breathing spots, scattered here and there at different points in the 
city, where the population is dense and the localities remote 
from the established parks. The names and locations of these 
parks are as follows: Hamilton Fish Park, Houston, Stanton, 

Pitt and Sheriff streets; William H. Seward Park, Norfolk street, 
Hester street and East Broadway; “ Little Italy ” Park, One 
Hundred and Eleventh to One Hundred and Fourteenth street, 
and I'irst avenue to East river; West Side Park, Ninth and Tenth 
avenues, Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth streets. 

There are also under the jurisdiction of the Park Department 
a system of drives and parkways designed to connect, in the Bor- 
ough of the Bronx, Van Cortlandt Park with Bronx Park, Bronx 
Park with Pelham Bay Park, and Crotona Park with Bronx 
Park. In Brooklyn there are twenty-two miles of parkways, 
consisting of the Ocean Parkway, from Prospect Park to Coney 
Island; Eastern Parkway, from Prospect Park to Ralph avenue; 
Eastern Parkway Extension, from Ralph avenue to Ridgewood 
Park; Fort Hamilton Parkway, from Prospect Park to Fort 
Hamilton; Bay Parkway, from Ocean Parkway to Bensonhurst 
Beach; Bay Ridge Parkway, from Fort Flamilton avenue to Fort 
Hamilton, and Seventy-fifth street, from Fort Hamilton Parkway 
to Bay Parkway. 

In addition to the above there are about sixteen miles of drives 
connecting Eastern Parkway and Eastern Parkway Extension 
with Jamaica avenue and contiguous street recently opened for 
public travel. There are also two bicycle paths, each five and a 
half miles in length, located on the Ocean Parkway, on each side 
of the main drive. 

It will thus be seen that the park system of Greater New 
York, although not until this year administered under one city 
government, has nevertheless been planned and laid out on lines 
which make it possible to maintain and extend and improve 
(when completed) into the most natural and beautiful chain of 
city parks and parkways in the United States. 




George V. Brower, 
Park Commissioner^ Brooklyn. 



132 



The parks of Greater New York, as they stand now in their 
lay-out and make-up, show that the people, and only the people, 
have been considered. In diversity of purpose they appeal 
equally to the poor and rich, the old and young. 

The work of the present Commissioners of Parks has been 
highly satisfactory this year. In spite of the entanglements which 
confronted every department of the City Government under the 
new Charter, Park Department work has gone ahead and several 
new features have been introduced and are now in process of 
completion. 

Among these works are the new Harlem River Speedway, 
which has just been completed, the establishment of an adequate 
range of greenhouses for Central Park, which are assured, be- 
cause of the active interest taken in them by President Clausen, 
of the Park Department. An appropriation sufficient to build 
these greenhouses ha^been set aside and as the contract is now 
going through it is thought they will be open to the public by 
next spring. These greenhouses will be a beautiful and attractive 
feature of the park. They will be principally devoted to rare 
plants, palms and exotics, and in addition to the pleasure and in- 
struction afforded there will be a department for the purpose of 
propagating plants which will of course be used strictly in park 
work. 

In addition to this feature the present Department has this 
year improved Riverside Park, skirting Riverside Drive, enlarged 
the Art Museum and completed a new wing on the Museum of 
Natural History. Many improvements have been made in the 
menagerie in Central Park and preparatory steps have also been 
taken toward the new library in Bryant Park. 

In the Borough of Brooklyn, although the Department has 
been hampered for lack of money to carry out all of their plans. 
Commissioner Brower and his assistants, Secretary Brown and 
Mr. De Wolf, the landscape architect, have made good use of the 
help and materials they have had at their command. 

Among the new parks under the superintendence of the 
Brooklyn Park Department are Red Hook Park, located in the 
Twelfth Ward; Fort Hamilton Park, at the end of the “Shore 
Road East Side Lands, a terrace park 500 feet square, bounded 
by Eastern Parkway, Flatbush avenue and Washington avenue, 
overlooking the Valley of the Elatbush, and a view of the sur- 
rounding country as far as Jamaica. Brooklyn Eorest, or Forest 
Park, properly in the Borough of Queens, but under the juris- 



133 



diction of Commissioner Brower, containing over five hundred 
acres of woodland scenery, and Sunset Park, from Forty-first to 
Forty-third streets. Fifth avenue to Seventh avenue, a new park 
to be completed after the Italian idea of architectural terraces. 

The above parks will each possess some distinctive and unique 
feature, and when completed will greatly add to the beauty and 
attractiveness of Brooklyn and Queens Boroughs, largely in the 
localities which have heretofore been destitute of anything of the 
kind. Red Hook Park, in the Twelfth Ward, a bit of nature sur- 
rounded by brick and mortar, a pleasing combination of walks 
and trees, grass and shrubber}- in a district where too many 
people live in too little space. Fort Hamilton Park, at the end 
of the Shore Road,” which was turned over to the Park De- 
partment when the Shore Road Commission went out of exist- 
ence, will be, when completed, a beautiful stretch of green over- 
looking the Narrows with a view of the Upper and Lower Bay 
and Staten Island which cannot be equalled this side of the 
clouds. 

Brooklyn Forest is intended for the real lovers of nature — an 
uncultivated forestry park, as it were— where those who like a 
day’s outing can have it free from the restrictions of the average 
park, with the privilege of botanizing and the study of arbori. 

In the Borough of Queens are located Kings Park, in 
Jamaica, which in its plan and purpose will be colonial. Revived 
Revolutionary architecture, old-fashioned flowers and stately 
trees will make this park look like a leaf of live history. 

Among the other parks in this borough are Monitor Park, 
in Long Island City, Court House Square, in Astoria, and a City 
Park in Flushing. The above parks have not heretofore been 
laid out or maintained according to the New York or Brooklyn 
standard, but the Brooklyn Park Commissioner intends to put 
them in the same fine green uniform that now covers the other 
parks under his jurisdiction. 

GEORGE C. CLAUSEN, 

PRESIDENT OF THE PARK DEP.'lRTMENT. 

George C. Clausen, President of the Department of Parks, 
and Commissioner of the same for the Boroughs of Manhattan 
and Richmond, was born in New York in 1849. His entry into 
the official and political life of the city was made in 1893, in which 
year ex-Mayor Gilroy appointed him one of the Commissioners 



134 



of Taxes. At the end of four months he resigned this office and 
was made a Park Commissioner. In this capacity he showed a 
natural aptitude for the work combined with a general adminis- 
trative ability which stamped him at once as a man in the right 
place. The difference in policy, however, which the incoming 
Republican administration had by inference suggested in their 
advance promises and protests, did not accord with Mr. Clausen’s 
views, and upon the day that Mayor Strong assumed office he 
resigned. 

'Mr. Clausen is devoted to park work, and while he has his 
own ideas as to what a park should contain, he does not advance 
these ideas or put them in practice until he is satisfied that they 
reflect the taste of the people and the interests of the city. He is 
decidedly opposed to ornamental buildings in parks unless they 
are a necessary adjunct. As to the future of Central Park, he 
does not favor the use of it for a general playground, contending 
that it was not the original plan to put it to such use, as the 
soil in many places is so light it will not permit being turned over 
for that purpose. 

Among' the improvements which he has been the means of 
having had adopted are the building of an adequate range of 
greenhouses. This has been a neglected feature of the parks, 
but Mr. Clausen and his colleagues have succeeded in securing 
an appropriation sufficient to carry on the work and the contract 
is now going through. These greenhouses are expected to be 
completed 'by next spring and when they are they will be a de- 
cided attraction. 

Long before he became a public official Mr. Clausen demon- 
strated in his private business that he had the executive ability 
necessary to carry on any enterprise he took a personal interest 
in. In his official life he has taken the same interest in the public 
welfare as he has in his own. In all of his important official acts 
he has shown a fine farsightedness in his policy and acts dealing 
with the future park system of Greater New York. 

GEORGE V. BROWER. 

George V. Brower, the present Park Commissioner of the 
Department of Parks for the Boroughs of Kings and Queens, is 
of an old Long Island family. His great grandfather, Abraham 
Brower, with his brother, were the owners of the old tide-mill at 



•35 



Gowanus, and which, by order of General Washington, was 
burned at the Battle of Long Island. 

He is a lawyer and has been a member of the Kings County 
Bar for over thirty years. 

In July, 1885, he was appointed by President Cleveland Gen- 
eral Appraiser of the Port of New York, and resigned the posi- 
tion at the expiration of Mr. Cleveland’s first term. He was 
appointed immediately thereafter one of the Park Commissioners 
of the City of Brooklyn, and elected President of the Board; 
subsequently the Department was made a single-headed Com- 
mission and Mr. Brower was appointed the first Commissioner, 
retaining the position until February, 1894. During the last term 
of Cleveland’s Administration he was offered the Appraisership 
of the Port of New York, which position he declined. 

AUGUST MOEBUS. 

August Moebus, appointed Park Commissioner for the Bor- 
ough of The Bronx, was born March 3, 1850, in Forsyth street, 
in the lower part of the city. When he was six months old his 
parents removed to what was then Mott Haven, and he has lived 
on the north side ever since. Mr. Moebus was educated in our 
public schools and Paine’s Business College. 

After his graduation from Paine’s he entered the employ of 
the American Graphic and Phototype Company, publishers of 
the Daily Graphic, with which he remained nine years. He then 
left this position to enter the brewing business, in which he has 
been engaged twenty-four years. 

Politically Mr. Moebus has been a stanch Democrat and has 
been a member of the Tammany Hall Organization for twenty- 
two years. In 1890 he was elected a member of the Board of 
-A.ldermen and re-elected in 1891. His services were most satis- 
factory to his constituents. 

His recent appointment by Mayor Van Wyck as Commis- 
sioner of Parks for the Borough of The Bronx, is a most im- 
portant position. He has seven undeveloped parks with an area 
of four thousand acres, under his jurisdiction, and it will be his 
duty to organize a new department for their proper maintenance 
and improvement. In addition he will have general supervision 
of the construction of the new Botanical and Zoological Gardens. 



136 

WILLIS HOLLY, 



SECRETARY OF THE PARK DEPARTMENT. 

Willis Holly, who has had a career up to date which will 
compare favorably in activity, industry and general usefulness 
to any man’s in New York, was born July 14, 1854, in Stamford, 
Conn. 

His boyhood days were passed in Brooklyn, but he came to 
New York the day after he left school and has called this his 
home ever since. He began to earn a living as an office boy, and 
did his work so well in this small capacity that in a very short 
time he was made a reporter of the Sun. Mr. Holly’s work on 
this newspaper, from police reporter to Albany correspondent 
and political writer, extended over a period of twenty-one years. 
When he resigned his newspaper position in 1889 to become 
Secretary to Mayor Grant it is well known that the profession 
lost one of its best posted and most capable men. 

When Mayor Gilroy assumed office he retained Mr. Holly in 
the same position. Previous to January of this year he has acted 
as private secretary to Nathan Straus, and advertising manager 
for R. H. Macy & Co., in which dual capacities he performed an 
amount of work which would phase almost any one except a 
fine newspaper man. Mr. Holly’s present duties are varied and 
complex, but his newspaper instinct for finding out things and 
the best way to do them are a sufficient guarantee to the public 
that he is in his right place. 

CLINTON H. SMITH, 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY, PARK DEPARTMENT. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Clinton H. Smith was born in New 
York City about forty years ago. He was educated at the High 
School in Plainfield, N. J., and subsequently ,,took a private 
course under the tutorship of a professor at Amherst College. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Smith’s first experience at earning a liv- 
ing was in the supply business, which he embarked in upon his 
finishing his studies in 1878. In 1879 he entered the employ of 
the Park Department and has been connected with the Depart- 
ment ever since, working his way up to his present position of 
Assistant Secretary by means of his ability and thoroughness to 
handle detail work of a large and varied order, which the inside 
duties of the Park Department continually calls for. 



137 



Aside from his official duties Lieutenant-Colonel Smith has 
always had a taste and a sincere fondness for military matters, 
his first affiliation being with the Seventh Regiment, from which 
he resigned ten years ago to become a member of the Seventy- 
first. In this regiment he immediately found a larger military 
life, as his career as a soldier has since shown. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Smith’s military life during the invasion of Cuba is told 
largely in the accounts of his regiment, but his personal bravery 
on the field of battle, the care and watchfulness which he displayed 
at all times and in all places to those under his direct command, 
will be written high on the record page of the regiment when the 
books of history are made of the part the Seventy-first played in 
the war. 

The long service he has rendered the City in the Department 
of Parks and the services he has given to his country are evidence 
enough of his capacity and courage. The recent presentation of 
a sword by the residents of Smithtown, L. L, to Lieutenant- 
Cole nel Smith is a slight testimonial of his popularity by those 
who ave known him as one among them. 

ROBERT T. BROWN, 

Robert T. Brown, Secretary, Department of Parks, Bor- 
oughs of Brooklyn and Queens, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 
the. year 1855. At the age of sixteen he learned the trade of a 
printer and at the age of twenty-one became a member of New 
York Typographical Union No. 6, at the age of twenty-six, as- 
suming charge, as superintendent, of a large printing establish- 
ment in New York City. He held that position for thirteen years, 
at the end of which time he lost his situation through a “ strike ” 
organized by Typographical Union No. 6 against the office in 
which he was employed. Mr. Brown’s name is still carried on 
the Roll of Honor of Typographical Union No. 6 for the honor- 
able part he took in the strike. One year after the loss of his 
position Postmaster Andrew T. Sullivan, of Brooklyn, appointed 
Mr. Brown superintendent of the Post Office Printing Depart- 
ment in the Brooklyn Post Office, which position he held for 
three years, until January 26, 1898. 

For the past six years Mr. Brown has represented the Twen- 
tieth Assembly District of Kings County as a delegate to the 
Democratic General Committee of Kings County, and three years 
ago he was elected Corresponding Secretary of that body, a 



138 



position which he creditably filled up to the first of the present 
year. 

During the past three years he has conducted the speaker’s 
campaign of the Democratic Party in Kings County, and in the 
year 1896 he organized and' became the first President of the 
Speaker’s Club of Brooklyn, which had two hundred and fifty- 
six orators enrolled on its books' 

During the memorable City Convention in the fall of 1897, 
which ended in the selection of Robert A. Van Wyck as the 
Democratic candidate for Mayor, Mr. Brown was elected Sec- 
retary of that body, and when, on January i, 1898,: the Demo- 
cratic city officials assumed charge of the various departments 
of the municipal government, his name was presented for' the 
position he now holds. No man had a more hearty or earnest 
indorsement than he for the position. 



JOHN DE WOLF, 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT, PARK DEPARTMENT. 

John De Wolf was born in Rhode Island forty-four years 
ago. He was graduated from a college in his native State and 
engaged in the practice of his profession almost immediately 
after giving up his studies. 

As a landscape architect he was successful from the start, 
his first piece of w^ork displaying such beauty of treatment that 
orders began to pour in upon him from every part of the country 
as well as abroad. Among the country seats and estates of 
which Mr. De Wolf has been the landscape architect are the 
Van Wickle Estate, at Bristol, R. I., the country seat of Lawson 
Valentine, at Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, and the Villa Manna, 
the property of Mrs. G. C. Haines, on Lake Como, Italy. 

Mr. De Wolf’s floral designs and general landscape work in 
Prospect Park, Brooklyn, are characterized by a striking orig- 
inality of treatment, expression and lay-out that has made his 
work one of the principal attractions of the park. 

Among the best examples of Mr. De Wolf’s work in Pros- 
pect Park are the lily pond, the old-fashioned flower garden and 
the floral stairway. All of the above are unique features in the 
park and are referred to continually as good studies for florists 
and landscape gardeners. 



THE SCHOOL SYSTEM OF GREATER NEW 
YORK. 



The first man to teach school on Manhattan Island was Adam 
Roelandsden, who was brought from Holland for the purpose 
by the Dutch Governor, Wouter Van Twiller. This was in 1633. 
There are now 8,500 public school teachers in the territory com- 
prising Greater New York and 5,000 on Manhattan Island alone. 
The second man to engage in teaching school in what is now 
the City of New York was Jacob Van Corlaer, who opened a 
private school. The testy old Peter Stuyvesant was then gov- 
ernor, and he closed Corker’s school because it had been opened 
without permission of the authorities. 

The Public School Society was the first intelligent organized 
effort to provide a plan of free education for the children of the 
citizens of New York, and out of that effort grew the public 
school system of to-day. This society was the entire educational 
government from 1807 to 1842, when the Board of Education was 
organized. The two worked together in more or less harmony 
until 1853, when the society voluntarily surrendered its charter 
and gave way to the younger organization. During its lifetime 
of forty-six years it expended $3,509,755 — not much more than 
is now required to carry on the schools of the Borough of Man- 
hattan for six months or the Brooklyn schools for one year. In 
1807 there were seventy pupils, and the expenditure for that 
year was $913. In the last year of the society’s existence the 
attendance was 24,320, and the outlay for the year was $141,906. 

The great interest which the public men of olden times took 
in the schools is seen in the length of time many of them gave 
to the society, viz.: De Witt Clinton, twenty-three years; Peter 

Cooper, fifteen years; Bindley Murray, twenty-nine years; An- 
son G. Phelps, fifteen years, etc. Alexander Hamilton and John 
Jay also gave a great deal of their time to the public schools. 
Governor George Clinton took a deep interest in the question, 
and in his message to the first State Legislature after the adop- 
tion of the Constitution, urged the extension of the school sys- 
tem. Out of this suggestion grew a law which appropriated $50,- 
000 a year for five years, to be applied to the schools of the State. 

General Lafayette inspected the city schools of New York, 
including a school for colored children, during his visit in 1824. 




FRANKLIN C. VITT 



141 



There was a great turnout of school children, teachers and citi- 
zens, in honor of Lafayette. City Hall was packed. One of the 
elder pupils made an elaborate address of welcome, to which the 
general, who may have been a trifle bored, replied in six words: 
“ I thank you, my dear child.” 

It is creditable to New York that it had three free schools 
when it had but ten watchmen and two constables. Now there 
are within the greater city 575 public schools and 850,000 school 
children. The actual registration is above 770,000 pupils. Of 
these 575 schools 329 are in the Borough of Manhattan and 115 
in Brooklyn, the others being in the suburban counties. The 
value of the school property is $32,000,000. and the annual out- 
lay necessary to the maintenance of the schools about $12,000,- 
000. Half of this latter sum is the amount paid in salaries to the 
teachers. 

Under the new Charter a unification of the various schools in 
the Greater New York territory was necessary, and to accom- 
plish this was no small task. The work devolved upon Seth Low, 
Stewart L. Woodford (ex-Minister to Spain), and Silas B. 
Butcher. As the Charter Commission, these gentlemen found 
Avithin the boundaries of the new metropolis every kind of school 
government known in the State, and one or two not known in 
the State. To find one system was an educational problem of 
magnitude. The plan finally agreed upon, and which is now a 
pai;t of the Charter, suggests the general plan of the government 
of the States of the Union. There is a central government, cor- 
responding to the general government, and known as the Board 
■of Education. Subordinate to this are the five divisions of the 
greater city, viz. : Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, Richmond and 
Queens. Each of these boroughs has its own School Board and 
a Board of Superintendents, and controls its own schools, subject 
to the authority of the central body. The Board of Education, 
with Charles Bulkley Hubbell at its head, consists of thirteen 
members chosen from the School Boards of the five boroughs. 
The central body has power over the school system of the entire 
city, directs the apportionment of the funds, fixes salaries, etc. 

The Brooklyn public schools stand high among the schools 
■of the country. William H. Maxwell, Superintendent of Schools 
of the City of New York, was Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion in Brooklyn for ten years. Under his guidance the schools 
took high rank. There are 115 schools in the Borough of 
Brooklyn, including the districts of Flatlands and Canarsie, 



142 



which are under the control of the Board of Education. The 
number of pupils registered in Brooklyn is not far from 140,000. 
There are about 2,800 teachers, including principals. The an- 
nual cost of maintaining the schools, including the purchase of 
sites and the erection of new buildings, aggregates $3,000,000. 
The normal increase in the number of pupils in Brooklyn is 
5,000 a year; in New York, 15,000. 

The supply department of the Brooklyn schools was for five 
years under the intelligent direction of Parker P. Simmons, the 
present Superintendent of School Supplies of the greater city. 
The value of the supplies, which include text books, janitor’s 
supplies, and everything pertaining to the care and maintenance 
of the Brooklyn schools, is about $150,000 a year. In his new 
position. Superintendent Simmons will have the disbursement 
of not far from $1,500,000 a year for school supplies of all kinds. 
His selection by the central body was practically a foregone con- 
clusion from the passage of the Charter Act, for his fitness for the 
place had been demonstrated in many ways, and he had warm 
friends and supporters in all the borough boards, while the 
Brooklyn officials were a unit for him. In this instance, the 
value of an education as a pre-requisite to success in the public 
service has been conspicuously emphasized. To a liberal edu- 
cation Superintendent Simmons has added long experience as a 
public school teacher, a successful business career (he is still a 
member of the Produce Exchange), a technical knowledge of 
the details of book making and book selling, and a measure of 
executive ability that is rarely excelled. He is a graduate of 
Bowdoin College, Class of 1875. His home is in Brooklyn. 

A. Emerson Palmer, recently elected secretary of the Board 
of Education of the City of New York, has been an active news- 
paper man in that city for more than twenty years. During 
most of this time he has been connected with the New York 
Tribune. Mr. Palmer has always taken great interest in edu- 
cational matters, and his familiarity with the vast public school 
system of New York particularly fits him for the position to 
which he was chosen. 

April 7, 1837, Amon McVey was appointed to specially look 
after the repairs of school buildings in New' York, at a salary of 
$750. He w'as provided with a small shop in the rear of one of 
the school buildings. This was the beginning of the present De- 
partment of Construction, at the head of which is C. B. J. Sny- 
der, Superintendent of School Buildings, a member of the New 



143 



York Chapter, American Institute of Architects; American So- 
ciety Heating and Ventilating Engineers, and the Public Art 
League of the United States. There are at present 158 school 
buildings in the Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx, the 
total value of which is $20,000,000. There is one public school 
building in New York which cost, including the land, $575,000. 

The following named constitute the Board of Education of 
the City of New York: John G. Agar, Ellery E. Anderson, Otto 
T. Bannard, Edward L. Collier, Horace E. Dresser, John E. 
Eustis, William Greenough, Charles Bulkley Hubbell, Hugh 
Kelly, G. Howland Leavitt, Jacob W. Mack, Henry W. Max- 
well, John McNamee, Frank Perlet, Nathaniel A. Prentiss, 
Henry A. Rogers, J. Edward Swanstrom, Henry W. Taft, John 
R. Thompson. 

The members of the School Board for the Boroughs of Man- 
hattan and The Bronx are as follows: Charles Bulkley Hubbell, 
President; Arthur McMullin, Secretary; Robert Maclay, Daniel 
E. McSweeny, M. D., Hugh Kelly, Jacob W. Mack, Alexander 
P. Ketchum, Charles Bulkley Hubbell, Walter E. Andrews, 
Richard H. Adams, John G. Agar, E. Ellery Anderson, John E. 
Eustis, William Greenough, Joseph J. Little, Henry Rice, Otto 
T. Bannard, Wiliam H. Hurlbut, Henry A. Rogers, Nathaniel 
A. Prentiss, Charles C. Burlingham, Henry W. Taft, James P. 
Lee. 

The School Board of Brooklyn is composed of the following 
members: J. Edward Swanstrom, President; Ira L. Bamberger, 
Miss I. M. Chapman, John J. Colgan, John Y. Culyer, Thomas 
M. Farley, Nelson J. Gates, Mrs. M. E. Jacobs, Adolph Kiendl, 
Henry C. McLean, George E. Nostrand, Miss E. H. Perry, Mrs. 
E. F. Pettengill, Mrs. J. M. Powell, John R. Thompson, James 
Weir, Jr., Frank L. Babbott, Thomas Cacciola, Charles N. Chad- 
wick, George P. Clark, Edward L. Collier, George Freifeld, 
John Griffin, Franklin W. Hooper, Ditmas Jewell, Elwin S. 
Piper, John K. Powell, Charles E. Robertson, Henry P. Schmidt, 
Arthur S. Somers, John J. Williams, J. F. Bendernagel, Horace 
E. Dresser, Carl A. Evertz, George H. Fisher, George D. Ham- 
lin, John Harrigan, A. S. Higgins, H. W. Maxwell, John Mc- 
Namee, George W. Schaedle, Samuel R. Scottron, George H. 
Woodworth, James Wright, Richard Young. 

The following constitutes the Board of Queens: G. Howland 
Levitt, President; Wilson Palmer, Secretary; F. G. Pauly, 
George Maure, Theodore Chapman, F. De Hass Simonson, John 



144 



S. Power, Wiliam G. Wainwright, Daniel Callahan, George F. 
Spaeth. 

The Board of Richmond is as follows: Frank Perlet, Presi- 
dent; Franklin C. Vitt, Secretary; George T. Egbert, Thomas J. 
Flannagan, John T. Burke, Emil Bottger, Samuel Anderson, 
William J. Cole, Thomas Vaughan, Louis Ffeymann. 

CHARLES BULKLEY HUBBELL. 

PRESIDENT, BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Mr. Charles Bulkley Hubbell, the eldest son of Dr. 
Charles Lyman Hubbell, was born in Williamstown, Mass., July 
20, 1853. He was educated at Williams College, from which 
institution he was graduated in the Class of 1874. At college he 
was a noted athlete, being a member of the University crew, and 
was the first student of Williams College to win honors in inter- 
collegiate athletic sports. After completing a course of study at 
law he was admitted to practice, and has since been an active 
and prominent member of the Bar in New York. His wife, 
Emily Allen Chandler, was a daughter of the Honorable William 
A. Chandler, of Connecticut, and is a direct descendant of Gur- 
don Saltonstall, an early Governor of Connecticut. Mr. Hub- 
bell’s marriage took place in 1879. Their family consists of three 
daughters. The country home of the family is at Brookside 
Farm, Williamstown, Mass., a place that was owned by Captain 
Absalom Blair, one of Mr. Hubbell’s ancestors, in 1764. 

Mr. Hubbell has long taken a great interest in educational 
matters, has been for several years a member of the Board of 
Education of New York and is now its President. He has 
served as a Trustee of Williams College, and is at present the 
President of its Alumni Association in New York. He is a 
member of the New England Society, the Bar Association, the 
Sons of the Revolution, the Society of Colonial Wars and the 
University Club. 

Mr. Hubbell’s family tree is one that Mr. Hubbell can point 
to with pride. According to a well-supported tradition the 
Hubbell family is descended from a Danish nobleman, Harold 
Hubbell, who went to England with King Canute in 1016, and 
received estates in Northumberland, with the Eortress of Har- 
oldstone. He died in 1035: two of his sons fell at the battle of 
Hastings and the third, Hugo Hubbell, driven from the North 



145 



County, settled on the estates of Hunsborg and Honstone, in 
Rutlandshire. 

Richard Hubbell, 1627-1699, his descendent of the English 
family, came to New England about 1645. 1647 he took the 

oath at New Haven, settled at Guilford, Conn. 

In the second generation the great great grandfather of the 
present Mr. Hubbell was Captain Eleazar Hubbell, 1700-1770, 
of Staatfield and New Fairfield, his wife, Abigail Burr, being of 
the same family as Aaron Burr. Dr. Charles Lyman Hubbell, 
1827-1890, father of the subject of this sketch, was a well-known 
physician of Troy, N. Y. Mr. HubbelTs mother was the 
daughter of Gershom Taintor Bulkley, of Williamstown, Mass. 
The Bulkley family descends from the Reverend Peter Bulkley, 
a graduate of St. John’s Gollege, Gambridge, the first minister 
of Concord, Mass., who contributed one-sixth of the volumes 
that comprised the original library of Harvard College. Ger- 
shom Bulkley graduated in one of the first classes at Harvard; 
married the daughter of Charles Chauncy, its second President, 
and gave to the college the ground on which Gore Hall now 
stands. He was the first Surgeon-General of Gonnecticut. 

PARKER P. SIMMONS. 

Under the consolidation of the various municipalities now 
comprising Greater New York, the Superintendent of Supplies 
of the Board of Education becomes a most important official in 
the administration of public affairs. 

The present incumbent of the office, Parker P. Simmons, was 
born in Kingston, Mass., in 1852, and graduated from Bowdoin 
College in the Class of 1875. He immediately took up teaching 
as a profession and became, in succession. Principal of the High 
School at Mandon, Mass., and Sub-master of the High School at 
I.awrence, Mass. Later he was associated for several years with 
several school-book publishing firms, during which time he trav- 
eled extensively in many States, and made many contracts with 
school boards and the managers of some of the best institutions of 
learning in this country. He thus acquired a thorough knowl- 
edge of the various systems of school supply and made the most 
of his opportunities in meeting and dealing with men of education 
and business. He afterward engaged in the flour trade, and was 
for nine years an active member of t}ie Produce Exchange in the 



10 



146 



City of New York. He still holds his seat in the Produce Board. 
His home is in the City of Brooklyn, and in 1886 the Mayor of 
that municipality appointed him a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation. He was twice re-appointed, and in 1891 resigned to ac- 
cept the position of Superintendent of the School Supply Depart- 
ment, which had been created by the Board as something abso- 
lutely necessary in the administration of school affairs. For seven 
years Mr. Simmons had direct personal charge of all the supplies 
necessary for the great school system of Brooklyn, and in March, 
1898, he was the natural and logical candidate for advancement to 
a similar position under consolidation. 

The Board of Education of the greater city elected him Super- 
intendent of Supplies and he immediately began a thorough re- 
organization of the Department under the new provisions of the 
law. His appointments of Deputy Superintendents of Supplies 
in the different boroughs have been most excellent ones, and his 
selection of secretaries, clerks and other attaches has made the 
office in Grand street one of the most perfectly equipped in the 
municipal regime. The functions of his office require the making 
of many important contracts and the proper distribution of a vast 
amount of school supplies, without delay, friction or error. 

The expenditures each year mount up into the millions, and 
•every penny in disbursements must be vised and approved by the 
Superintendent from day to day. Mr. Simmons is married, has 
Ivvo sons, and still makes his home in the Borough of Brooklyn. 



A. EMERSON PALMER, 

SECRETARY BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Mr. A. Emerson Palmer, who was elected Secretary of the 
Board of Education of the City of New York (the Greater New 
York Board), on February 21, 1898, is a native of Sullivan 
County, N. Y., but has been a New York City man for more than 
twenty years. After graduating from Wesleyan University, Mid- 
dletown, Conn., with the degree of M. A., in 1874, he joined the 
staff of the New York Tribune, and was continuously connected 
with that journal as reporter, copy editor and editorial writer 
until his election to his present office. Mr. Palmer has long been 
interested in educational affairs, and in 1894 he was Secretary of 
the advisory committee appointed by Mayor Schieren of Brook- 
lyn to suggest improvements in the school system of that city. 



147 



He is about forty-five years of age, and lives with his family at’ 
No. 615 Putnam avenue in the Borough of Brooklyn. 



C. B. J. SNYDER. 

C. B. J. Snyder was born at Stillwater, New York, on No- 
vember 4, i860. His ancestors, who settled in the vicinity of 
Albany, N. Y., about the middle of the seventeenth century, 
came from Holland and England. 

He received a common school and an academical training, 
came to New York City in 1878 and about a year later took up 
the study of architecture, attending at the same time one of the 
architectural classes at Cooper Union. After completing the 
course and due study he entered upon the practice of his profes- 
sion, both in this city and suburban towns, gaining an unqualified 
measure of success. 

In July, 1891, Mr. Snyder was appointed by the Board of Ed- 
ucation of New York City to the position of Superintendent of 
School Buildings. During the reconstruction of the school sys- 
tem in 1895, and again under the Charter of Greater New York, 
he was re-elected, in both instances by a unanimous vote. His 
position as Superintendent of School Buildings of Greater New 
York carries with it the duty of designing, and supervising the 
erection of all public school buildings in Greater New York. 

Having made a careful study of the best of the public school 
buildings throughout this country, as well as visiting the more 
noted of those in Europe, Mr. Snyder has revolutionized the 
designing and construction of the public school buildings in this 
city, as a comparison between the old and new buildings will 
show, bringing them up to a standard of excellence which is 
not exceeded. 

He is a member of the New York Chapter A. I. A., and of 
the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers. 

HUBBARD R. YETMAN. 

Hubbard R. Yetman, Superintendent of Schools for the 
Borough of Richmond, was born in Monmouth County, New 
Jersey, in 1847, and was educated in the High School in Eree- 
hold. When scarcely fifteen years of age he enlisted in the 
Eourteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers, and went to the 



148 



front as a drummer boy. He remained until his regiment was 
mustered out at the close of the war, and was in a number of 
severe engagements. 

On his return from the army he settled in Tottenville, and 
taught in the public schools for fifteen years. During this time 
he was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace for several 
terms, and also represented several insurance companies, from 
which he secured a large business. 

In 1888 he received the Democratic nomination for Member 
of Assembly, and was elected by a heavy majority. He was 
again elected to the Assembly in 1891 and 1892, in both instances 
receiving large majorities. 

Mr. Yetman’s political popularity and reputation has ex- 
tended beyond the precinct of Staten Island, and in New York 
City, where he is well known and respected, his qualifications for 
the important position he now holds were immediately recog- 
nized. 

FRANKLIN C. VITT, 

SECRETARY SCHOOL BOARD, BOROUGH OF RICHMOND. 

Franklin C. Vitt, Secretary of the School Board for the 
Borough of Richmond, was born in New York City in May, 
1853. In 1865 he went with his parents to Staten Island, and 
has since resided there. 

Mr. Vitt was for a time managing clerk for a firm of New 
York lawyers, but resigned the position in 1883, when he was 
elected Justice of the Peace for the Town of IMiddletown. He 
held this office continuously up to April, 1897, when he re- 
signed. 

In 1890 Mr. Vitt was appointed Clerk of the Board of Super- 
visors, and held this position until the Board went out of exist- 
ence on the inception of the new Charter. 

Mr. Vitt has the reputation of being the most careful, prompt 
and accurate clerk the Board ever had, which is sufficient proof 
that he will prove an efficient Secretary to the School Board, to 
which position he was appointed in February of this year. 



DEPARTMENT OF TAXES AND ASSESS- 
MENTS. 

The Department of Taxes and Assessments consists of a 
President and four Commissioners; the former appointed for six 
years and the latter for a term of four years, respectively. Upon 
the present Department, which assumed office on the ist day of 
last January, devolves the power and duties of the Department 
of Taxes and Assessments in the former City of New York, of 
the Department of Assessments in the former City of Brooklyn, 
and like Departments in the Boroughs of Queens, Richmond 
and The Bronx. 

The Board of Taxes and Assessments has the power to ap- 
point forty Deputy Tax Commissioners. The duties of these 
Deputy Commissioners are to secure — in all the boroughs and 
parts of the city — equality of valuations of property for the pur- 
poses of taxation and to assess all taxable property in the dis- 
tricts where they are assigned. They must further furnish to the 
Board, under oath, a detailed statement of all such property, show- 
ing that they have made a personal examination of each piece of 
property in their districts, and also in their judgment the sum for 
which said property, under ordinary circumstances, would sell. 
The Deputy Commissioners are requested to assess all real and 
personal estate on the first Tuesday of September in each and 
every year. 

The Department of Taxes and Assessments, in addition to 
the main office in the Borough of Manhattan, must maintain an 
office of the Department in the Boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, 
Bronx and Richmond. In each of the above offices there is to 
be kept an annual record of assessed valuations which shall be 
open for examination and correction from the second Monday 
in January until the 1st day of May in each year. 

The Department of Taxes and Assessments has the power 
(with the consent of the majority of the Commissioners) to remit 
or reduce — if found excessive — any tax upon real or personal 
property. Taxes are payable November i of each year. If paid 
by that time the Receiver of Taxes is authorized to deduct in- 
terest at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum between the day of 



such payment and the ist day of December succeeding. To 
taxes paid in December i per cent, is added. After January i 
interest is added at the rate of 7 per cent, a year. 

Assessments for local improvements other than those con- 
firmed by a Court of Record, are made by the Board of Assessors, 
who are appointed for the purpose by the Mayor. The Comp- 
troller, Corporation Counsel and President of the Board of Pub- 
lic Improvements constitute the Board of Revision of Assess- 
ments. 

Assessments for local improvements shall in no case exceed 
one-half of the fair value of the property assessed. 

The report of the Department of Taxes and Assessments for 
the first quarter of the year ending July 30 is an interesting state- 
ment, showing the assessed valuation of real and personal estate 
in the Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx for the year 1898 
as compared with such valuation for the year 1897. 



Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx. 



Assessed value of real estate, 1898 $1,856,467,923 00 

Assessed value of real estate, 1897 1,787,186,791 00 

Increase for 1898 $69,281,132 00 



Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx. 



Assessed value of personal estate, 1898 $509,022,449 00 

Assessed value of personal estate, 1897 381,449,065 00 

Increase for 1898 $127,573,384 00 



The following statement shows the valuations of real estate 
exempt from taxation for the year 1898; 



Valuation. 

New York City property $244,666,414 00 

United States property 20,340,000 00 

New York State property 507,000 00 

Church property 50,312,100 00 

Miscellaneous property 43,239,680 00 

Clergymen’s property ($1,500 each) 65,000 00 



152 



Valumiun. 

Parsonages $206,550 00 

Property purchased with pension money 6,350 00 



$359,343,094 00 



The total assessed value of real estate in the several boroughs 



last year (1897) was as follows: 

INIanhattan $1,694,472,365 00 

Bronx 92,714,426 00 

Brooklyn 570,107,742 00 

Queens 82,683,593 00 

Richmond 24,371,551 00 



And a grand total for 1897 of. . . $2,464,349,677 00 



THOMAS L. FEITNER. 

Thomas L. Eeitner, President of the Department of Taxes 
and Assessments, and one of our prominent lawyers, was born in 
New York on July 31, 1847. His early education was received 
largely in the common schools, he having been a pupil under 
Professor Plunter, in old No. 35, several of whose boys have 
become prominent in the official and civil life of the city. After 
he left school he studied law with Quentin McAdam, Esq., and 
was admitted to the Bar by the General Term of the Supreme 
Court in the year 1869. He then began the practice of law at 
No. 56 Wall street, where he has since continued, and the firm of 
Eeitner & Beck is recognized as one of the best among civil law 
practitioners. 

About the 9th of May, 1883, he was appointed one of the 
Commissioners of Taxes by Mayor Edson, on a joint petition of 
the Taxpayers’ Associations and the Tammany Hall General 
Committee. ' 

The ability and energy with which he administered the duties 
of this office were recognized by Mayor Grant, who, upon the 
expiration of his first term in 1889, reappointed him for another 
term of six years. 

Mr. Eeitner was the first Commissioner in twenty-five years 
to receive this compliment, notwithstanding that a Commis- 
sioners’ term expired every two years. 



T 



153 

On the 3d of January, 1893, he resigned this office to accept 
that of Police Justice, which was tendered him by Mayor Gilroy, 
for an unexpired term of nine months. He was then reappointed 
by him for the full term of ten years. This office was abolished 
by act of the Legislature in July, 1895. 

i\Ir. Feitner then resumed his legal practice until he was again 
called to official life by Mayor Van Wyck, who appointed him 
President of the Department of Taxes and Assessments of 
Greater New York on January i, 1898. 

Pie has filled nearly every position, including that of Sec- 
retary of the Tammany Hall General Committee, of which he has 
been a member for over twenty-five years. Pie has been one of 
the Sachems of the Society for ten years past and was elected 
Grand Sachem in April, 1897. He is a member of the Manhat- 
tan, Democratic and Catholic Clubs; also of the State Bar Asso- 
ciation, and is one of the Trustees of St. Patrick’s Cathedral. 

He is married and has a family consisting of his wife, tw'O 
daughters and a son. 

EDWARD C. SHEEHY. 

Edward C. Sheehv, a member of the Board of Taxes and 
Assessments, is about fifty years old, and received his education 
in the public schools of this city. After graduation he engaged in 
the real estate and building business, in which, during his long 
and active career, extending over a period of nearly thirty-five 
years, he has been prominent in many large and important trans- 
actions. 

Mr. Sheehy is a life-long Democrat and cast his first vote 
with Tammany Hall, in which he soon became prominent, and in 
1871 was elected a member of its Executive Committee. 

In 1880 he was appointed by the Supreme Court a member 
of the East River Park Commission, where his real estate train- 
ing and knowledge proved him an invaluable member and en- 
abled him to perform most active and efficient work, the result 
of which did much to alleviate the condition of the crowded tene- 
ment districts of the east side. 

In 1882 ]\Ir. Sheehy was elected to the State Assembly, where 
he served on the Insurance, Banking and State Charity Com- 
mittees. 

The following year he was elected to the Common Council, 
and in 1889 was appointed by Mayor Grant Commissioner of 



154 



Charities and Correction for a term of six years, from which office 
he was removed by Mayor Strong fifteen days before its termina- 
tion, after an admirable and efficient administration. 

Mr. Sheehy was appointed January i, 1898, by Mayor Van 
Wyck, a Commissioner of Taxes and Assessments from the Bor- 
ough of Manhattan for the five-year term, which office he now 
holds. 



ARTHUR C. SALMON. 

Arthur C. Salmon, Commissioner of Taxes and Assess- 
ments, is forty-five years of age; resides at No. 224 Dean street, 
and is a Brooklynite. Attended the old Adelphi Academy and 
Stamford Military Institute, graduating First Lieutenant. Spent 
some time in Germany finishing his education. Studied law 
with Hon. Homer A. Nelson, ex-Secretary of State. Attended 
Columbia College Law School; was admitted to the Bar in 1876 
and has ever since been engaged in the active practice of his 
profession in Brooklyn. Is now Chairman of the First Assem- 
bly District Committee, and Treasurer of Democratic General 
Committee of Kings County, and has always been active in party 
work. 

Was associated with the late ex-Judge Jasper W. Gilbert as 
a Commission to revise the Charter of the City of Brooklyn, 
under chapter 626, Laws of 1886, and the result of their labors 
is now known as chapter 583, Laws of 1888. Was Assistant 
Corporation Counsel of Brooklyn for six years under General 
Almet F. Jenks. Is a leading member of the Royal Arcanum, 
and has represented his Council in the Grand Council of the 
State for fifteen years; he also represents the State in the Supreme 
Council of the Order, in which Body he holds the important 
position of member of the Committee on Laws. He is a Mason, 
member of Acanthus Lodge 719 and the Scottish Rites Bodies; 
is also a member of the Democratic Club, Montauk Club, Royal 
Arcanum Athletic Club and other social organizations. 

Mr. Salmon stands well at the Bar and enjoys the reputation 
of being a careful and painstaking lawyer. He is the legal mem- 
ber of the Board of Taxes and Assessments, as required by the 
Charter of the greater city. Socially he is very popular, and his 
appointment has met with widespread approval. Mr. Salmon’s 
head is a good study for the phrenologist, for it shows an inter- 
esting mental organism — rare characteristics of a happy and an 



155 



honest man. A man with a good digestion and judgment, 
frank, loyal and practical, it is not difficult to understand how 
all these qualities of mind and heart make a successful and pop- 
ular man. 



THOMAS J. PATTERSON. 

Thomas J. Patterson, who was appointed a Commissioner 
of Taxes and Assessments by Mayor Van Wyck, for a term of 
three years, was born in Brooklyn, in which city he has resided 
all his life. He is forty-nine years of age. 

Mr. Patterson was appointed a member of the Board of As- 
sessors by Mayor Whitney, in 1886, and was reappointed by 
Mayor Chapin. He is considered one of the best judges of real 
estate values in the Borough of Brooklyn. 

In 1893 he was the Democratic candidate for Sheriff of 
Kings County, and although he ran many thousand votes ahead 
of his ticket, he was defeated in the tidal wave of that year. 

He is an unswerving Democrat, and is a member of several 
social and benevolent organizations in Brooklyn, and up to the 
time of his appointment as Tax Commissioner was President of 
the Brooklyn Coal Exchange. 



WILLIAM F. GRELL, 

William F. Grell was born in the City of Kiel, Germany, 
in the year 1852. He attended the public schools and college 
there until he attained the age of seventeen years. He left Ger- 
many in the year 1870. Upon his arrival here he obtained a 
position as a clerk in a commercial house and in the year 1876, 
started in the produce business in this city, on his own account, 
and from that time on he has been engaged in different mercan- 
tile pursuits. 

Mr. Grell is very popular among fraternal organizations, be- 
ing a Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

He has also held office, for over seven years, in the Pla- 
deutsch Volksfest Verein, one of the largest organizations in 
this country. 

Mr. Grell has always taken an active interest in local as well 
as national politics. 

In 1895, when the obnoxious Raines law went into effect, 
Mr. Grell attracted a great deal of attention by his earnest work 



156 



towards the suppression of the measure, and the success of the 
public demonstration against the bill, in which over 40,000 voters 
took part, was largely due to his efforts, and from that was or- 
ganized the New York German Democracy, of which Mr. Grell 
is the President. 

During' the recent Presidential campaign, while other men 
in public life were very reticent about expressing their views of 
the Chicago Platform, he took a very active part in support of 
the Bryan ticket, and he was supported in this, to a man, by the 
New York German Democracy. 

He was appointed by the Hon. Robert A. Van Wyck, IMayor 
of the City of New York, on January i, 189S, to the position 
which he now holds, that of Tax Commissioner. 





DEPARTMENT OF DOCKS AND FERRIES. 



The head of the Department of Docks is called the Board of 
Docks. The Board consists of three persons, known as Com- 
missioners of Docks and Ferries, whose term of office is six years. 

The Board of Docks has exclusive charge and control of the 
wharf property belonging to the City, including all the wharves, 
piers, bulkheads and structures thereon. The Board also has 
control and charge of the repairing, building, maintaining, alter- 
ing, leasing and protecting the above property. 

In addition to the foregoing the Board has general charge of 
the water-front of the city and of leasing ferry rights for a period 
not exceeding ten years. The right to set apart certain piers 
for recreation purposes and to erect suitable structures thereon 
also comes under the administration of the Dock Board. 

Apart from the Commissioners, the Department of Docks 
and Ferries consists of a Secretary, Chief Clerk, Apportionment 
Clerks, Superintendent of Docks, fifteen Dock Masters, in place 
of Harbor Masters, Engineer-in-Chief, and eleven Assistants, and 
a staff consisting of a Surveyor, two Transit Men, three Levelers, 
two Computers, five Hydrographers, a staff of eleven Draughts- 
men, a Lumber Inspector, one Searcher of Water Grants, one 
Superintendent of Repairs, one Foreman Ship Carpenter, one 
Superintendent of Machinery, and about 560 additional employ- 
ees, consisting of Dredging Inspectors, Property Clerk, Clerks, 
Stenographers, Watchmen, Cleaners, Boat Builders, Deck-hands, 
Pilots, Recreation Pier Attendants, Dock Builders, Stone-cutters, 
Masons, Calkers and Laborers. 

J. SERGEANT CRAM, 

PRESIDENT, DEPARTMENT OF DOCKS AND FERRIES. 

J. Sergeant Cram was born in New York City forty-five 
years ago. He was educated at Harvard University and later 
entered Harvard Law School, where he was graduated in 1876 
with the degree of L.L. B. 

Upon the completion of his studies he began the practice of 
law in the office of his father, and succeeded to his father’s large 
and lucrative practice. 



In 1889 Mayor Grant appointed Mr. Cram a Dock Commis- 
sioner; he retained him in office, he was elected President of the 
Board, and the end of his term left a good account of himself 
for the part he took in the plan and supervision in rebuilding the 
docks, piers and sea-walls of the city. The above improvements 
were made after Mr. Cram had made careful studies of the prin- 
cipal dock and pier structures of Liverpool and Southampton. 
One-half the sea-wall and all the modern piers of the city were 
built during Mr. Cram’s second term in the Dock Department. 

Mr. Cram is well known to the citizens of New York, not 
only through the active interest he has taken in public affairs, 
but also because of his fine social qualities. He is thoroughly at 
home in any society, and being a man of broad education and 
pleasing address, is a welcome guest in any circle where people 
of broad views are to be found. 

Mr. Cram is a member of the Tammany Society, Knicker- 
bocker, Metropolitan and Democratic Clubs. 



PETER E. MEYER, 

COMMISSIONER OF DOCKS AND FERRIES. 

Peter F. Mever was born in New York 
in 1848. He received a limited school edu- 
cation, but a mental endowment of common 
sense, keen perception and wide observation, 
which he has always used to the best advan- 
tage, has made him one of the best posted 
men of affairs in the city. 

Mr. Meyer began life seriously as a Cen- 
tral Park water boy at forty cents a day. His 
spirit was too fine for that of a water boy. 
however, and he went to work for the Mer- 
cantile Exchange at more than double the salary he had been re- 
ceiving. 

In 1862 Mr. Meyer started in the real estate business at No. 1 1 1 
Broadway, and has remained there since. At the above address 
he has conducted some of the largest real estate sales in this coun- 
try. This has given him a wide prestige in his field, and he is re- 
garded to-day as one of the finest judges of real estate values ir 
the State. 

.A.mong the sales of real estate disposed of through iMr. Meyer 




159 



are the Jumel estate, which took seven days to sell, the Lorillard 
and Catherine Wolfe estates, the syndicate sale of Morton, Bliss 
& Co., the Bathgate, Joshua Jones, Hunt and Fay estates. 

That Mr. Meyer is a man of large ideas the above transactions 
show. To meet him is to meet a man of decisive character. It is 
never necessary to have a second interview with him when it is 
possible to settle a matter at one sitting. He does not keep his 
friends or opponents on the anxious seat, and whether it is in busi- 
ness or politics he can be depended upon. This has given him a 
high standing in the real estate world. 

He is a member of the New York Athletic, Democratic, Olym- 
pic and Sagamore Clubs. 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, 

TRE.VSURER, DEPARTMENT OF DOCKS AND FERRIES. 

Charles F. Murphy was born in New 
York City, June 20, 1858. Mr. Murphy, 
who has lived all his life in the district (the 
old Sixteenth) where he was born, received 
his education in the public schools of this 
city, and when he became old enough to 
shoulder responsibility started in business 
for himself, in which he has been very suc- 
cessful. 

Mr. Murphy has been interested in poli- 
tics, and since he became of age has always 
been a member of Tammany Hall. Beginning in the ranks 
as a modest worker for the cause of his party, he has risen 
to the leadership of his district, which he assumed upon 
the death of Senator Hagan in 1892. The district in 
which Air. Alurphy, although naturally Democratic, has always 
been a field where the Republicans have used extra efforts to 
gain control of. It is needless to say that they have not been 
successful, for Air. Murphy and his associates have so perfected 
the working organization of their party in the district that it has 
never yet met with defeat. This is due to Mr. Murphy’s execu- 
tive ability, tact and personal qualities. He is a friend to every 
Dne in the district who deserves a friend, and his many kind and 
charitable acts are a sufficient guarantee of the good feeling that 
•exists for him by his friends and neighbors in the district. 




i6o 

WILLIAM H. BURKE, 

SECRETARY DEPARTMENT OE DOCKS AND FERRIES. 

William H. Burke was born in New 
York City of Irish parentage. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of New York, 
upon leaving which he learned the printing 
trade, mastering same thoroughly, and was 
employed for a number of years in a respon- 
sible position by one of the largest estab- 
lishments in the city. 

He afterwards established a large and 
successful coal business at One Hundred 
and Sixth street and the East river; this he 
conducted for a number of years. In 1889 he was appointed 
Water Purveyor in the Department of Public Works, under 
Mayor Grant, and served as such until 1893, when he was ap- 
pointed a Police Justice by Mayor Gilroy; this office he held 
until July, 1895, when, by an Act of the Legislature, the office of 
Police Justice was abolished, creating in its stead a Board of 
Magistrates. 

Pie was appointed Secretary of the Board of Docks in 1898, 
under INIayor Van Wyck. 

In politics he has always been a stanch Democrat and a loyal 
supporter of Tammany Hall, being for many years the Demo- 
cratic leader of the Twenty-sixth (now the Thirty-third) Assembly 
District; he has also been for a number of years and is now a 
member of the Sagamore Club, the Society of Tammany and the 
Democratic Club. 

His early training and many years of employment in the print- 
ing business, as well as his experience and knowledge acquired in 
the mercantile life, has well qualified him for the important posi- 
tion he now fills as Secretary of the Department of Docks and 
Ferries. 




THE AQUEDUCT COMMISSION. 

The above department was credited (chapter 490, Laws of 
1883) for the purpose of building the new Croton Aqueduct and 
its appurtenances. 

\\'hen the work on the above enterprise has been finished and 
the structures completed it will be the duty of the Commission 
to transfer them to the Department of Water Supply. 

Work in process of construction, especially the new Croton 
Dam and Jerome Park Reservoir, has been continued, and under 
the provisions of the new Charter will be continued until January 
I, 1901. 

This Commission has built the Croton Aqueduct with a flow- 
ing capacity of 300,000,000 gallons per day, also six high dams 
and corresponding reservoirs, all of which have been transferred 
to — what was then called previous to January i, 1898 — the De- 
partment of Public Works. The Board of Public Improvements 
have now assumed all the rights, privileges and functions of the 
former Department of Public Works. 



MAURICE J. POWER. 

Maurice J. Power, Aqueduct Commissioner, was born 
in Cork, Ireland, October 14, 1836. His parents emigrated 
to Utica, this State, when he was three years old, and they lived 
there a few years until they moved to this city, his constant resi- 
dence since. 

At the age of twelve he began to learn the art of monumental 
sculpture in stone, under the direction of Robert E. Launitz, of 
this city, a distinguished sculptor of that day. 

Following this occupation for twenty years with success, his 
attention became turned to bronze founding, and, in 1868, he 
established the National Fine Art Foundry in East Twenty-fifth 
street, where have been produced many of the most notable 
pieces of bronze sculpture in this country. Among them are 
the bronze work on the Trenton (N. J.) Battle Monument (in- 
cluding a colossal bronze statue of Washington, twelve feet high): 
the bronze work of the Monmouth (N. J.) Battle Monument; the 
Tower of \fictory at Newburgh, N. Y. ; the Soldiers’ Monuments 



It 



at Augusta, Me., Manchester, N. H., at Clinton, Holyoke, Law- 
rence and Springfield, Mass., and at Albany and Buffalo, N. Y.; 
the battle pieces in low relief designed and cast for the States of 
Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania and placed in the National 
Military Park at Chickamauga; the Irish Brigade Monument at 
Gettysburg; the equestrian high relief sculptures of Lincoln and 
Grant in the Brooklyn Memorial Arch; the memorial to the cap- 
tors of Andre at Tarrytown; the monument on the battlefield of 
Oriskany in Oneida County; the statue of Patriotism erected at 
Kingston by General George H. Sharpe in honor of the 120th 
New York Volunteers, and the Confederate Soldiers’ Monuments 
at Savannah, Ga., and Wilmington, N. C. 

Judge Power was the political protege of Samuel J. Tilden, 
who placed him at the head of the Democratic Party in their dis- 
trict — the famous old Sixteenth. After the decision of the Elec- 
toral Commission against Mr. Tilden in February, 1877, Judge 
Power assisted in the formation of the Democratic organization 
which nominated and elected Edward Cooper to be Mayor, in 
1878, and which became the County Democracy in 1881. In 
1886 he was made the Chairman of the County Democracy, and 
remained in that office until its merger into the State Democracy 
in 1894. 

In 1880 Mayor Cooper appointed him to be a Justice of the 
Police Court, and he served upon the Bench for ten years. June 
25, 1893, Mr. Cleveland made him United States Shipping Com- 
missioner at the Port of New York. He held that place until 
December ii, 1897, when he was appointed to be Aqueduct 
Commissioner by Mayor Strong. He was re-appointed by 
IMayor Van Wyck January 4, 1898. 



WILLIAM H. TEN EYCK. 

William H. Ten Eyck, Vice-President of the Aqueduct 
Commission, was born on March 7, 1847, at the corner of Reade 
street and West Broadway. He attended the public schools in 
Yorkville and Harlem, and was graduated from the Harlem 
Public School on One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street. 

In 1864, and until 1872, Mr. Ten Eyck was engaged in the 
paper business, retiring from this trade in the latter year to 
engage in the real estate business, in which he has been very 
successful. 



i64 



During all these years Mr. Ten Eyck has been active in 
politics, but not from the personal side. His time, outside of his 
regular business, has been spent in furthering the interests of 
his party. 

He is a member of the Republican Club of the Thirty-fourth 
Assembly District, the North Side Republican Club, of which he 
was Chairman of the Executive Committee from 1884 to 1898. 
Mr. Ten Eyck has also been President of the Twenty-third' Ward 
Republican Association, succeeding himself in that capacity for 
ten years. In 1880-1896 he was a delegate to the Republican 
County Committee, Secretary of the County Committee in 1894, 
a delegate to the Republican State Committee in 1898, and in 
1897 was a delegate from the Sixteenth Congressional District 
to the City Committee of the Republican Party of Greater New 
Y ork. 

A glance at the above is sufficient to show that Mr. Ten 
Eyck’s connection with the Republican Party of his district, city 
and State has not been a sinecure. His capacity for hard work, 
coupled with his loyalty and earnestness was the means of mak- 
ing him Clerk of the Board of Aldermen during Mayor Strong’s 
term; having been elected by the members of the Council, which 
consisted of 14 Democrats, 14 Republicans and 3 Independent 
Democrats. 

Mr. Ten Eyck is working just as hard in his present position 
in the interest of the City as he has in the past in private enter- 
prises, and no one who knows him doubts but what he will give 
a good account of himself. 



JOHN P. WINDOLPH, 

AQUEDUCT COMMISSIONER. 

John P. Windolph was born in Prussia, Germany, on June 
30, 1844, where he received a common school education; he came 
to this country in 1859 and took up the trade of a gilder. 

When President Lincoln called for Volunteers during the 
Civil War, he responded when but a boy and enlisted in the 
Seventh Regiment, New York Volunteers, and served until the 
regiment was mustered out; then re-enlisted in the Second New 
Jersey Cavalry and served until the close of the war. After the 
war he went into the hotel business, which he carried on very 
successful. In 1884 he was nominated for the Assembly in the 



then Thirteenth Assembly District, and elected by an overwhelm- 
ing majority and re-elected in 1885. In 1886 he was renomin- 
ated but declined the nomination. In 1894 he was elected 
Alderman in the old Fifteenth District, and subsequently elected 
Vice-President of the Board, in which capacity he served for 
three years. 

On the 30th of June, 1898, he was appointed Aqueduct Com- 
missioner by Mayor V an Wyck. In politics he has always been 
a staunch Republican. 

He is a member of the Republican Club of the City of New i 

York, Arion Society, Heinebund, Grand Army. | 



Alphonse Fteley was born in Paris, France, April, 1837. 
He served his apprenticeship in several engineering offices in 
Europe, applying himself especially to mill engineering. 

He came to the United States in 1865 and a year later became 
an assistant to William E. Worthen, past President of the Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers, and was employed by him on 
various engineering and mechanical undertakings until 1870. 
Erom 1870 until 1873 Mr. Fteley was engaged in general en- 
gineering practice, giving up his time principally, however, in 
work connected with highway construction, surveying, bridge- 
work and hydraulic engineering. 

In 1873 he removed to Boston, where he was called to take 
charge of all the work of construction for the Sudbury river 
water system, as Resident Engineer. Mr. Eteley rendered that 
city valuable services while he was engaged in the above work, 
some of the results of which were published in the Transactions 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was especially 
commended upon his extended and important investigations to 
determine the flowing capacity of brick structures, which, to- 
gether with his other services, was the means of making him 
Assistant Chief Engineer of Boston for the following four years. 

In 1884 Mr. Eteley was appointed Assistant Engineer of the 
Aqueduct Commission of New York, and was given a promi- 
nent part as a consulting authority in the design and architecture 
of this splendid system of water supply. He was afterward made 
Consulting Engineer to the Commission, and in 1888 he became 
the Chief Engineer, which position he still fills. 



ALPHONSE ETELEY, 



CHIEF ENGINEER, AQUEDUCT COMMISSION. 




In addition to his permanent work, Mr. Fteley has been often 
called into consultation in connection with important engineer- 
ing enterprises and to furnish expert evidence and opinions on 
important cases before the courts. Among the works upon 
which his services have been required in one capacity or another 
are the Southern Boulevard in New York, from Third avenue to 
Jerome Park; the Hoosac Tunnel; the Brooklyn, N. Y., Hoboken 
and Newark N. J., sewerage systems; as Consulting Engineer 
on additional water supplies for St. John, N. B., Albany, N. Y., 
Cincinnati, O., Cambridge, Mass., and other cities. 

Mr. Fteley was elected a member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers in 1876, and has just been justly honored by 
being elected President of the Society. 

Personally, Mr. Fteley is what all men of fine talents and 
splendid abilities are — quiet, dignified, self-contained, modest. 

HARRY W. WALKER. 

Harry W. Walker, Secretary of the Aqueduct Commission, 
is the eldest son of Judge Ralph Walker, of Missouri. He was 
born in St. Louis in i860, and was educated at Drury College 
there. He began his newspaper work under the late Col. John 
A. Cockerill, in his native city. He came to New York fourteen 
years ago, and while he has not lived here continuously since, no 
matter in what part of the globe his work took him, his news- 
paper connections have always kept him in close touch with the 
public life of the metropolis. 

Mr. Walker has filled important reportorial positions in this 
city and was for some time correspondent of the Evening Tele- 
gram in Washington, where he made a national reputation as a 
newsgatherer, one of his best pieces of work being an article 
which resulted in the Sugar Trust investigation. 

Two years ago Mr. Walker was a member of the European 
Staf¥ of the Associated Press, and was stationed in London, 
where he attracted attention both in and out of newspaper circles 
by the brilliancy of his work. 

There are no newspaper men who know public men better 
and who say less about it than Mr. Walker. Perhaps it was for 
this reason that he was given charge of the newspaper work for 
Tammany Hall during the last campaign; but whether it was or 
not, he conducted the literary bureau so successfully that it was 
evident he was capable of filling a more permanent and important 
position — which he now has. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF 



HEALTH. 



The experience of other nations having shown that disease 
and death, especially in epidemic form, could best be averted or 
controlled in some measure by public authority, and the large 
and apparently increasing death-rate of the city, beginning with 
the approach of the dreaded cholera, having alarmed the citizens 
of New York, the Health Department was organized in 1866 
(chapter 686, Laws of 1866), in time to cope with the epidemic 
which began in ]\Iay of that year. This was the first really suc- 
cessful attempt to limit and extirpate this disease, and its success 
made the Health Department of New York known over the 
civilized world.* 

The Department has charge of and is responsible for the 
sanitary condition of the city and its inhabitants; its powers in 
that respect being almost autocratic. It scrutinizes the drainage, 
ventilation and lighting of dwellings and public business build- 
ings, overcrowding, and, to some extent, the cleanliness even 
of private apartments, the food supply at the ferries and depots, 
in the slaughter-houses, markets, stores and streets; investigates 
the origin and environment of cases of contagious and infectious 
diseases, and provides against their spread; conducts special hos- 
pitals for the proper care of such cases; has entire control of the 
disposal of the dead, and collects and preserves the records of 
births, marriages and deaths in readily accessible form for legal 
and statistical purposes. 

The Department has this year continued, with undiminished 
ardor and efficiency, the regular work of the Boards in what 
was formerly the Cities of New York and Brooklyn. The new 
Charter, by which much territory was added to the city and its 
population largely increased, rendered it necessary to organize 
new branches, or subordinate executive and administrative 
offices in places where the sanitary service had previously been 
absent or negligent and inefficient. This has involved a great 
amount of preliminary instruction of citizens as to their duties 
under the sanitary code toward themselves and others, and as to 

* It is perhaps worthy of note that Asiatic cholera, which is by no means as fatal 
or as difficult to control as a number of other diseases, furnished the initiative both 
for the establishment of the present Department of Health and for the introduction 
of bacteriological methods of diagnosis and prophylaxis into its routine work, to the 
great advantage of the public. 



their relations with the public authorities, of the same nature as 
confronted the Department in New York City when first organ- 
ized, and which hampered its efforts, more or less, for several 
years. These difficulties of administration have been overcome 
by persistent effort, but have occupied the close attention of the 
Board up to the present date. They have been surmounted so 
far with surprising success. 

Besides this organization of the borough offices and the ad- 
justment of their relations to the Central Office in the Borough 
of Manhattan, the Board of Health has devoted itself with vigor 
and determination to various nuisances involving large corpo- 
rate interests, which have existed for many years in the suburban 
portions of the new city without material abatement (Barren 
Island, Newtown Creek, L. I. R. R., etc.). 

The growth and development of the Department is best 
shown by an enumeration of the various special divisions, with 
the date of their respective segregation from the general or mis- 
cellaneous work. 

Originally all of the outside work (that which brought the 
Board of Health in immediate relation to the public), excepting 
that of the Chemist, was done by one class of Inspectors, who 
had to be, necessarily, all medical men, because their duties in- 
cluded the diagnosis and disposition of cases of contagious 
diseases, and also vaccination of the poor. As the work became 
too onerous for them, special divisions were created, as follows : 
Contagious diseases, in 1874; the inspection of milk and other 
foods, in 1883; bacteriological and pathological investigation of 
contagious and infectious diseases, in 1892 (a result of the 
cholera epidemic of 1891-2, when, by the application of modern 
scientific methods, the cholera which had ravaged Europe, as in 
previous epidemics, was here strangled in its birth and prevented 
from entering the country*); the supervision of the health of 
women and children employed in mercantile establishments in 
1896, and the medical inspection of public school pupils in 1897. 

The number of orders issued by the Board for the abatement 
of nuisances and other purposes has increased from 11,680 in 
1870 to 22,905 in 1880; 23,139 in 1890; 42,722 in 1897, and 25,098 
for the first eight months of 1898. 

The annual expenditures have increased from $77,943.18 in 



* It is a curious fact that, of the nine deaths by reputed cholera in this City in 
1892, not one could be traced to any other case, and not one of the deceased was a 
native of the United States, and not one recovered. 



170 



$253,363-32 in 
as follows : 


1880; $581,358 in 1897, and $958,496.50 


Manhattan . . . 




The Bronx .. . 




Brooklyn . . . . 


194,566 50 


Queens 




Richmond . . . 





$9S8>496 50 



The above figures represent a per capita expenditure of 
$0.1015 in 1866; $0.2095 in 1880; $0.2921 in 1897, and $0.2787 
in 1898. 

As a result of the labors of this Department the death-rate 
of the city has decreased from 35.3 per 1,000 in 1865 (the year 
before its organization) to 19.5 in 1897, and an estimated rate for 
1898 of not over 19.3. That this decrease has been progressive 
is shown below by five-year periods : 



Years. 

1866-1870 


Deatli 

29 


rate. 

8 


1871-1875 


29 


7 


1876-1880 


25 


0 


1881-1885 


27 


5 


1886-1890 


25 


8 


1891-1895 


24 


6 


1896 




5 


1897 


19 


5 


1898 (est.) 


19 


3 



The marked decrease since 1895 is due, in considerable de- 
gree, to the work of the Division of Bacteriology, especially in 
the introduction of antitoxin for the treatment and prevention of 
diphtheria, the death-rate from which for the past six years runs 
as follows : 

Death-rate from 
Diphtheria. 

1-23 

1-45 

1-59 

1-05 

-91 

.80 



Year. 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

— and for 1898 still lower. 



1/1 



The Department of Health during the past year condemned 
and destroyed : 

Fish 832,005 pounds. 

Meat 885,742 “ 

Fruit 4,318,530 

Vegetables 443,740 “ 

Milk 555 quarts. 

— vaccinated 109,875 persons; visited 85,067 cases of contagious 
disease; disinfected 30,849 apartments; made 25,669 microscopi- 
cal examinations of diseased tissues; produced over 30,000 doses 
of diphtheria antitoxin and 5,000 of tuberculin, and indexed and 
classified more than 113,000 births, deaths and marriages. 

The head of the Department of Health is the Board of Health, 
consisting of the President of the Police Board, the Health 
Officer of the Port and three Health Commissioners, two of 
whom shall have been practising physicians for not less than ten 
years preceding appointment. The Health Commissioner who 
is not a physician becomes the President of the Board, and is so 
designated in his appointment. Term of office of Health Com- 
missioners, six years. The Secretary is appointed by the Board, 
and their legal adviser is an Assistant Corporation Counsel, de- 
tailed to serve as such by the head of that office. 

The Board of Health performs legislative as well as executive 
functions, and promulgates the body of ordinances known as the 
Sanitary Code, which, under decision, of the Court of Appeals, 
have the binding effect of law. 

There are two Bureaus in the Department of Health : 

The Sanitary Bureau and 
The Bureau of Records. 

The Chief Officer of the Sanitary Bureau is the Sanitary 
Superintendent, who shall have been for at least ten years a prac- 
tising physician, and for three years a resident of the City of 
New York. He is the chief executive officer of the Department. 
The chief officer of the Bureau of Records is the Registrar of 
Records, and in said Bureau are recorded, without fees, the 
births, marriages and deaths, and the inquisitions of Coroners. 

The central office of administration is in the Borough of 
Manhattan, and in each of the five boroughs there are subordi- 
nate or branch offices of each bureau, those of the Sanitary 
Bureau being under the direction of Assistant Sanitary Superin- 
tendents, and those of the Bureau of Records under Assistant 



172 



Registrars. The records, files, reports and papers pertaining to 
each borough are preserved in the borough offices, respectively, 
and those pertaining to the general administration in the Central 
Office. 

Each borough office has five divisions, under the charge of 
Chief Inspectors. The work of the divisions relate, respectively, 
to Sanitary Inspection, Contagious Diseases, Food and Trade 
Inspection, Pathology and Bacteriology, and INIedical Inspection 
of Schools. 



COL. MICHAEL C. MURPHY, 

PRESIDENT OF THE BO.\RD OF HEALTH. 

Col. Michael C. Murphy, the President of the Health Board, 
is a living example of the paraphrased proverb that any man who 
is master of himself is naturally a leader of others. 

A glance at Col. Murphy’s features is enough to show that 
this is a correct general impression of the man. A leaf from his 
life confirms all of the above, and more. 

Col. Murphy was born March 7, 1841, in Killmallock, Lim- 
erick County, Ireland, and was brought to New York in his 
infancy. He was educated in the public schools and learned the 
trade of a compositor, but left his “ case ” in April, 1861, when he 
went to the front as Captain in Ellsworth’s Fire Zouaves. He 
later joined Corcoran’s Irish Legion. 

In 1867, and for six terms thereafter. Col. Murphy represented 
the First District in the Assembly. During all the years he was 
a member of the State Legislature he never missed a single ses- 
sion of the lower house, and his record for those years is stamped 
with the same aggressive features, the same fight for principle, 
justice and right that characterized all his acts during the Civil 
War. Among his colleagues he was easily the leader and won 
the enviable sobriquet of “ the truth teller ” when he spoke and 
voted against the “ Tweed Ring ” Charter. 

From 1884 to 1889 Col. Murphy was sent to the State Senate, 
and in this body repeated the fine record he made while an As- 
semblyman for his vigilance and courage in championing the 
rights of the wage-earners. 

Some of the best statutes affecting public interests in New 
York City are the fruit of his efforts. Among them may be 
mentioned the laws regulating rapid transit and reducing fares; 



T 



173 

those providing for small parks, better schools, the rights of vet- 
eran soldiers, school teachers and firemen. 

In 1889 a stricture of the atrophagus prevented Col. Murphy 
from swallowing any food. He had lost more than half his 
weight before the surgeons performed the operation which saved 
his life, yet he refused to take any anaesthetic while under the 
knife. For more than five years he has not tasted any food, his 
nourishment being tubed through an incision in his side. He is 
the only man who ever survived such an operation, which speaks 
volumes for the power of the will and intellect over matter. 



GENERAL EMMONS CLARK, 

SECRETARY HEALTH DEFALT ME XT. 

General Emmoxs Clark was born in Huron, Wayne County, 
N. Y., October 14, 1827. His father, William Clark, was an emi- 
nent Presbyterian Clergyman, and his earliest ancestors in this 
country were of the Puritans who came from England to Massa- 
chusetts in the early part of the Seventeenth Century. His 
education commenced in the common schools and he prepared 
for college at the Owego and Groton Academies. 

He entered Hamilton College in 1843, Sophomore 

Class, and graduated from that institution in 1847; three years 
thereafter he studied medicine, but his preference being for busi- 
ness pursuits he did not complete his professional education and 
in 1850 came to New York to engage in business. He was from 
1850 to 1865 Cashier of the first establishment in New York 
(No. 173 Broadway) for the sale of through tickets and for con- 
tracting for the transportation of merchandise from New York 
to the far west. In 1865 he became a partner in a wholesale 
drug house, and later became Secretary of a fire insurance com- 
pany. 

In 1866 he consented to accept the position of Secretary of 
the Metropolitan Health Department and was unanimously 
elected to that office March 8, 1866, when the Department was 
organized. The work of organizing the Department which had 
jurisdiction over all the territory now' included in Greater New 
York and in Westchester County north of its present southern 
line, devolved largely upon the Secretary of the Board. In all 
the changes which have taken place in the Board of Health 



174 



since 1866 there has been no change in the Secretary, and he 
has now (1898) held that office for over thirty-two years. 

General Clark commenced his military career as a pri- 
vate in Company B, Seventh Regiment, January 21, 1857, and 
was chosen First Sergeant in April, 1858, later in same year he 
was promoted to Second Lieutenant, and early in the following 
year First Lieutenant. In December, i860, he succeeded Alex- 
ander Shaler as Captain of Company B, Seventh Regiment, and 
in April, 1861, when the Seventh Regiment marched to the relief 
of the National Capitol, and during its campaign in that year, 
he was in command of Company B. He held the same rank in 
the regiment in its campaigns in Maryland in 1862 and 1863. In 
1864 he was elected Colonel of the Seventh Regiment and held 
that position until, by special act of the Legislature of 1889, he 
was made Brevet Brigadier-General — a period of twenty-five 
years. He served with the regiment in all the memorable occa- 
sions when it was called out by the civil authorities for the protec- 
tion of life and property and to restore and preserve order. 

General Clark has always preferred the position of Secretary 
of the Board of Health to any other, and has therefore declined 
all other offices when offered, among which were Commissioner 
of Fire Department, to which he was appointed by Governor 
Fenton in 1868, and Consul to Havre by President Flarrison in 
1889. 



Dr. william T. JENKINS. 

Dr. William T. Jenkins, Health Commissioner of New 
York City, who has played such a conspicuous part in the affairs 
of the city for the past fifteen years, is a native of the State of 
jMississippi. 

He received his early education in Virginia, graduating from 
the State University there at an early age, and soon after, in 1879, 
came to this city, where he has lived ever since. 

Dr. Jenkins first served the City in the capacity of Deputy 
Coroner, where he at once gave to the office an efficiency which 
stamped him as a man capable of handling larger problems. His 
opportunity came in 1892 when ex-Governor Flower appointed 
him Health Officer of the Port of New York. In this capacity 
he showed splendid ability and courage — the ability to cope with 
a serious situation, the courage to act and the courage to stand 
criticism. It was during the period in 1892 and 1893, when an 



175 



epedemic of cholera into this country was feared, that Dr. Jenkins 
distinguished himself. He rigidly quarantined every ship and 
compelled them to anchor in the lower bay until an examination 
of the passengers proved there was no danger from contagion. 
For this he was subjected to a good deal of unjust and severe 
personal criticism, but despite this he held his ground and carried 
out his policy. This is believed by many to have been the means 
of keeping cholera out of the United States that year. At any 
rate no one can be found at this day who will assert that Dr. 
Jenkins’s idea in connection with the. measures he adopted at that 
time was not the right idea. 

Dr. Jenkins is married, his wife being a sister of Richard 
Croker. He is recognized by the medical profession as an expert 
pathologist and one who will reflect credit on the Board of which 
he is now a member. 



Dr. JOHN B. COSBY. 

The career of Dr. John B. Cosby, Com- 
missioner of the new Health Board is that 
of a self-made man. He was born on a 
farm in Tennessee, not far from Carthage, 
and at an early age became a student at 
a college in Jackson, and was graduated 
with honor. He was then in his fifteenth 
year, but unlike most young men of that 
age had decided upon his vocation. He 
wanted to study medicine and had friends 
who believed in him thoroughly and 
showed their belief by helping him in a financial way to enter 
college. If it had not have been for his great self-reliance, how- 
ever, he would have never been known as one of the leading 
physicians of New York City. 

After Dr. Cosby was graduated from a Baltimore medical 
college he settled for a short time in his native town for the prac- 
tice of his profession. In a few months he announced his inten- 
tion to remove to New York City. Friends endeavored to dis- 
suade him, but as he had not, up to this time, known what 
failure was he carried out his plan. He had a preference for 
medicine. His first work was done in the city hospitals. At the 
end of two years he opened his own office, and by his ability and 




1/6 



skill had gained a wide and profitable practice. Inheriting his 
Democracy from his Tennessee home and its surroundings, He 
has been a firm adherent of Tammany Hall for many years, and 
it is to the credit of that great political institution that it had the 
wisdom to select for one of ,its Health Commissioners .a physi- 
cian of the standing and character of Dr. Cosby. 

Socially, Dr. Cosby is just as popular as he is in a professional 
way. A man of great courage and strong personalty, he inspires 
and impresses all who come in within his domain with his fine 
qualities of mind and heart. 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE. 

COL. ASA BIRD GARDINER, 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY OF NEW YORK. 

Col. Asa Bird Gardiner, now the Dis- 
trict Attorney of New York, is one of those 
fine character studies biographers ever take 
delight in — a man of many men. 

A complex character to those who cannot 
understand how a man can do so many 
things and do them well. A strong, simple, 
direct character to those who know the man. 

If Col. Gardiner were a “ genius ” — as 
genius is understood — he could not be a 
better lawyer and he would have been a 
poorer soldier, a citizen and an author. As he stands now he is a 
gentleman of many high talents and such fine mental power that 
success to him is anything he takes an active interest in. 

Col. Gardiner was born in the City of New York September 
30, 1839. He was educated in the public schools and afterwards 
was graduated from the College of the City of New York with 
the degree of A. B., and from the Law Department of the New 
York University with the degree of LL. B., in i860. He was 
admitted to the Bar in November, i860, and at once entered upon 
the practice of law in his native city. 

Col. Gardner’s army record embraces a period of over twenty- 
five years, and in that time he has seen and experienced a greater 
variety of active service than fall to the lot of most soldiers. In 
1861 he relinquished the practice of law in this city to assist in 
raising a regiment of volunteers, and in July of that year, as First 
Lieutenant of the Thirty-first Regiment, Infantry, New York 
Volunteers, participated in three engagements — a skirmish at 
Fairfax Court-house, action at Blackburn’s Ford and Battle of 
Bull Run, for which latter engagement he was mentioned by 
name for good conduct in action by the Colonel commanding 
his regiment in his official report. 

In the following year, 1862, he served in the Shenandoah 
Valley, Va., in the Eighth Army Corps, as Captain Twenty-sec- 

12 




] 






j 



1/8 



ond Regiment, New York Volunteer jNlilitia Infantry, and was 
with this regiment in the Gettysburg campaign of 1863, in whidi 
he was wounded. On July 24, 1S63, he was honorably mus- 
tered out by expiration of term of service and for his conduct 
in the Gettysburg campaign received a “ Medal of Honor,” under 
the Act of Congress of March 3, 1863. In 1865 Col. Gardiner 
was appointed First Lieutenant and Adjutant U. S. Veteran 
Reserve Corps and Captain by brevet U. S. Volunteers for 
“ gallant and meritorious seiuuces during the war.” In August, 
1866, he was on duty at Newport Barracks, Ky., and in October 
of the same year was at Headquarters General Recruiting Ser- 
vice, U. S. A., New York City, as Acting Assistant Adjutant- 
General and Disbursing Officer on the staffs, successively, of 
General Daniel Butterfield and General Isaac V. D. Reeve. 

In July, 1874, he was appointed Professor of Law (Lieutenant 
Colonel) at the U. S. Military Academy at West Point. In 
March, 1885, he was ordered by the Secretary of War to prepare 
a suitable text-book for the Corps of Cadets at the U. S. Military 
Academy on the subject of military and martial law. 

In addition to the above Col. Gardiner has done much legal 
work for the War Department and was employed under succes- 
sive Secretaries of War on many important cases in the State 
and United States Courts, aftecting the army or navy. 

As an author Col. Gardiner has written a half a dozen or more 
important books, principally dealing with historical and military 
law. Among these are the “ Jurisdiction and Powers of the 
United States and State Courts, in reference to Writs of Habeas 
Corpus as Affecting the Army and Navy,” “ Evidence and Prac- 
tice in Military Courts ” and “ Practical Forms for Use in Courts 
Martial and Remarks as to Procedure.” 

He is also the author of a number of historical addresses, some 
of which have been published, including “ The Rhode Island 
Continental Line in the Revolution,” “ Uniforms of the Ameri- 
can Army from 1775,” “ Chaplains of the American Army from 
1775,” and the “ Allied Forces of France in America during the 
Revolution,” and “The Havana Expedition of 1762.” 

In 1862 he received the degree of A. M. from the College of 
the City of New York, the same degree from Dartmouth College 
in 1864 and Columbia College in 1869. 

Received the degree of LL. D. from the New York Univer- 
sity in 1875, the degree of L.H. D. from Hobart College 
in i8g6. 



179 



Col. Gardiner is a member of the American Ethnological, 
Phi Beta Kappa, New York Historical Society and the Loyal 
Legion. He was one of the incorporators of the Military Ser- 
vice Institution of the United States and a founder and incor- 
porator of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution. 

He is also a member of the Union, Metropolitan, West Point, 
Military, Manhattan, Democratic, Delta Kappa, Epsilon and 
Church Clubs. 



JOHN F. McIntyre. 

JoHX F. jMcIntyre, Assistant District Attorney, was born 
in New York City in 1855. He is a son of John B. McIntyre, 
an architect of many years’ standing in New York, and Frances 
A’irginia McIntyre, whose grandfather, Jean Esquiroll, was a 
revolutionary soldier. 

]Mr. McIntyre was educated in St. Francis Xavier’s College in 
this city, and was graduated from the Law Department of the 
University of the City of New York in 1876. 

Shortly after his graduation he entered upon the active prac- 
tice of his profession and gathered around him a large practice in 
the Civil Courts. He also entered politics and became extremely 
active. 

He was elected to the Legislature in 1887 and became promi- 
nent in the councils of the Democratic party; was afterwards 
appointed Special Counsel to the Comptroller, and in 1891 was 
appointed Assistant District Attorney by De Lancey Nicoll and 
was reappointed by Col. John R. Fellows, under whom he served 
with distinction until the death of Col. Fellows. 

During Col. Fellows’s term Mr. McIntyre tried many of the 
great cases in the District Attorney’s Office. He has prosecuted 
more persons for murder than any living man, and, it is said, that 
he has convicted more men for this crime than any one living. 

In December, 1896, many of the Irish societies of the United 
States retained Mr. McIntyre to go to London to defend Edward 
J. Ivory, an Irishman who had been arrested in Glasgow charged 
with attempting to use dynamite in Great Britain. Mr. McIntyre 
felt that it was a case savoring of English persecution, and con- 
sented to go, and resigned his position as Assistant District At- 
torney, sailed and reached London in January, 1897, and after 
an exciting trial in Old Bailey, in London, succeeded in acquit- 
ting Ivor}' and brought him back to America a free man. 




Mr. McIntyre has been an effective stump-speaker for Tam- 
many Hall for a number of years, and has been a Delegate to 
National and State Conventions of the Democratic party many 
times. 

He is a member of the Tammany Hall General Committee of 
the Thirtieth Assembly District. 

STEPHEN STACPOOLE BLAKE, 

ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Stephen Stacpoole Blake was born in County Clare, Ire- 
land, in 1843, came to the United States when about eight 
years of age. He comes of distinguished ancestry. On the 
maternal side he is, as his name indicates, a descendent of the 
Stacpoole family, many members of which have sat in the British 
Parliament, and on the paternal side he is the grand-nephew of 
the late Cornelius O’Brien, of Birchfield House, who represented 
County Clare in the same Body for nearly a quarter of a century. 

In 1865 Air. Blake graduated from the College of Our Lady 
of Angels, at Suspension Bridge, and subsequently made a two 
years’ course of philosophy and higher studies at the College and 
Seminary of Montreal, Canada. He was elected City Clerk of 
the City of Bridgeport, Conn., and served three years as Aider- 
man of that city. He was a member of the Class of 1871 at the 
Albany Law School, being a class-mate of Chief Judge Alton B. 
Parker. He was both Town Attorney and Prosecuting Attor- 
ney of Bridgeport, and was four times appointed Judge of the 
City Court of Bridgeport by the Connecticut State Legislature — 
the term being annual. 

In 1880, the Hancock Presidential year, Mr. Blake was 
chosen on the first ballot, without a dissenting voice, as candidate 
for Secretary of State by the Democratic State Convention. The 
late James E. English was his associate on the ticket. The tariff 
cut an important figure in Connecticut that year, and, although 
Mr. Blake ran ahead of his ticket, he failed of election by a 
narrow' margin. 

He came to New’ York in 1881, and in a short time acquired 
a large and lucrative practice, both civil and criminal. In the 
latter branch of the profession he attained distinction by reason 
of his success in the many important cases with w’hich his name 
is identified. Among the more famous of these cases may be 

. 




John F. McIntyre, 
Assistant District Attorney. 




- ^ Attorneys Office. 




i 82 



mentioned that of John Carpenter, charged with wife murder; 
Danny Lyons, who shot and killed Joe Quinn, the wrestler; Pas- 
qualina Robertiello, who killed her lover, and David Wheeler, 
charged with the murder of Detective Sergeant Carey. Although 
Mr. Blake has been counsel in some forty homicide cases, it has 
been his good fortune that but one, Danny Lyons, suffered capi- 
tal punishment. 

Mr. Blake has always taken an active interest in politics. 
For two years he was chainnan of the Tammany Hall General 
Committee of the old Twenty-fifth yVssembly District, and was 
President of the Sachem Club. He was a member of the Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1S94, and also of the Legislature of 
1895. In both bodies he made a brilliant record. Mr. Blake, at 
the beginning of the late District Attorney Fellows’s second term, 
was offered by him the position of Assistant, but at that time 
declined the honor. 

iMr. Blake, apart from his knowledge of the law and his 
interest in political affairs, is a gentleman of wide reading and 
original observation. This, coupled with a genial nature and a 
fund of humor, makes him a charming companion and a welcome 
guest everywhere. 

He is a good speaker, clear, convincing and entertaining, and 
although his powers in this direction have not yet been put to 
a severe test, his friends say when they are he will be known as 
a true son of eloquence. 

JAMES D. McClelland, 

ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

James D. McClelland was born in this city in 1843. He 
received his early education in the public schools and in 1862 
was graduated from the Mount Washington Collegiate Institute. 
Mr. ^McClelland then began the study of law and after graduating 
from the New York University Law School was admitted to the 
Bar and engaged in active practice in the year 1867. 

i\Ir. McClelland at once devoted himself to the practice of 
criminal law and has ever since made that branch of the law a 
special study. 

Few lawyers have tried as many criminal cases or introduced 
so many real reforms into the Criminal Code as Mr. McClelland. 
One of the most important of these reforms is the one which pro- 



183 



vides for bail at station-houses at all hours. For years accused 
persons had been deprived of the rights of bail after four o’clock 
in the afternoon until nine o’clock the next morning. Mr. Mc- 
Clelland secured the passage of this law which compelled captains 
and sergeants of police to accept bail between the above hours 
in cases of misdemeanor, and also providing that Police Justices 
be available to take bail in cases of felony. 

Mr. McClelland was elected to the Legislature in 1882 and 
while there secured the enactment of the Penal Code and insti- 
tuted important changes in the Code of Criminal Procedure, 
notably making notice of appeal per see operate as a stay of 
proceedings. The defense of Judge Westbrook by Mr. IMcClel- 
land, who had been arraigned for impeachment in the Legislature 
of 1882 made a deep impression at the time. 

Mr. McClelland is one of the picturesque figures on the staff 
of the District Attorney, and is frequently called upon by outside 
attorneys to decide some out-of-the-way point pertaining to the 
construction of criminal law. 

The judge of the trial courts and the President of the Bar 
Association gave him the highest indorsements for his present 
appointment, which is recognized everywhere by the legal pro- 
fession as one which reflects the good taste and judgment of the 
District Attorney. 

WILLIAM J. McKENNA. 

CHIEF CLERK, DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S OFFICE. 

William J. McKenna, the present Chief Clerk of the Dis- 
trict Attorney’s Office, was born near the Village of Gortin, 
County Tyrone, Ireland, on October 2, 1854. In 1863 his parents 
emigrated to Canada, but two years later came to New York 
City, where Mr. McKenna has resided ever since. 

Mr. McKenna was educated in the public schools, the College 
of the City of New York, and subsequently attended the Even- 
ing High School in West Thirteenth street for six winters. Thus 
equipped he obtained a situation in the wholesale dry goods 
house of A. T. Stewart & Co., where he was employed for four- 
teen years. 

In 1882 Mr. McKenna resigned from Stewart’s to accept a 
position as accountant in H. B. Claflin Company’s office, and in 
the fall of 1886, while still employed there, he received the Tam- 



i84 



many Hall nomination for Assembly in the old Sixth, now the 
Twelfth, Assembly District, and was elected over John Simp- 
son, the Republican leader of the District, by 1,046 majority. 

Mr. McKenna’s legislative career gave him an opportunity 
which he had not previously had of developing a latent talent 
for public speaking, and during his term as an Assemblyman 
he made many happy hits in connection with subjects under dis- 
cussion. On one of these occasions, when a measure known as 
the Suburban Rapid Transit bill was under discussion, he re- 
ferred to General Husted, then Speaker of the House, as “ a 
gentleman who possessed the urbanity of a Chesterfield and the 
sub-urbanity of a “ Westchesterfield,” whereupon the General 
called a colleague to the chair and came down on the floor to 
compliment Mr. McKenna on his felicitous combination of terms. 

Among the bills introduced by Mr. McKenna was a measure 
known as the Tammany Hall Anti-Trust bill, in advocacy of 
which ex-Congressman W. Bourke Cockran, Judge Roger A. 
Pryor and others appeared before the Committee on Ways and 
Means. 

In the spring of 1889 he was appointed Chief Searcher in the 
County Clerk’s Office. In November, 1891, Governor Hill ap- 
pointed Mr. McKenna County Clerk to succeed Leonard A. 
Geigerich, who had been promoted to the Bench of the Court of 
Common Pleas. On January i, 1893, wffien his term as County 
Clerk had expired, Governor Flower appointed him Coroner to 
succeed Ferdinand Levy, who had been elected Register. In 
December, 1894, on the recommendation of Thomas F. Gilroy, 
then Mayor, District Attorney Fellows appointed Mr. McKenna 
Deputy Chief Clerk of his office. When District Attorney Olcott 
assumed the office, in spite of much op])osition and pressure from 
leaders of his party, he, nevertheless, retained Mr. McKenna in 
his position. 

That Mr. McKenna’s appointment as Chief Clerk met with 
the approval of the business community is shown by the general 
keeping records instituted by Mr. McKenna. 

JAMES J. WALSH, 

.ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

James J. Walsh, Assistant District Attorney, is a native born 
New Yorker. He received his early education in the public 



L 



i85 



T 



schools, and after completing the Grammar School course, was 
graduated in 1877 from Manhattan College, where he received 
the degree of A. B. 

After his graduation Mr. Walsh entered the Columbia Law 
School and in 1880 was admitted to the Bar. 

Mr. Walsh began the practice of his profession in the office 
of the present Surrogate, Frank F. Fitzgerald. With the excep- 
tion of a brief period when he was a member of Congress — re- 
signing the office of School Inspector to discharge his duties in 
Washington — he has been in active practice in this city. He has 
for years made a specialty of criminal law and is one of the best 
informed men in the District Attorney’s office on the subject. 



THOMAS F. BYRNE, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Thomas F. Byrne was born in New York City. He was 
graduated from Manhattan College in 1874 and from the New 
York University Law School in 1877. He was admitted to the 
Bar in the same year and has continued in the practice since, in 
which he has been successful. 

Mr. Byrne is a gentleman about forty years of age. He is a 
member of Tammany Hall and the Democratic Club and is one 
of the right hand men of Senator Martin, in the Fifth Assembly 
District. He is popular in his district, due to his quiet and un- 
assuming nature and the fact that he possesses a fund of dry 
humor which never deserts him. 

i\Ir. Byrne’s leisure time is largely spent in the pursuit of the 
classics, for he is a great reader of that kind of literature. Mac- 
aulay is one of his favorite authors and although there is no re- 
flection of any particular writer in Mr. Byrne’s work, his law 
papers and similar writings show a pleasing and finished style 
which bespeak good reading and clear thinking. 



CHARLES E. LE BARBIER, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Charles E. Le Barrier is of French-American descent. 
He was born in New York City in 1859, and received his early 
schooling in Paris. When eighteen years old he entered the 
office of Coudert Brothers and began the study of law. He was 



admitted to the Bar in i88i. After several years of struggle as 
a lawyer, success came to him suddenly and unexpectedly. He 
undertook the defence of John Agulio, a bootblack, charged with 
murder in the first degree. The trial attracted a great deal of 
attention. He secured an acquittal for his client, and thereby 
made his reputation. Since that time he has been counsel in 
the trial of many important cases. He was once an attorney for 
the New York Department of Agriculture. In quick succession 
he won victories in the murder cases of Andrea Mucci, Costello, 
and in the famous case of Charles Olston, who was tried last 
Februar}'. 

Personally, Mr. Le Barbier is a quiet, self-contained gentle- 
man, who puts every one with whom he comes in contact quite at 
their ease. He possesses reserve force to a large degree. This, 
combined with other mental qualities of a high order, make him 
a valuable man in any capacity where sustained strength is neces- 
sary. In his present position as Assistant District Attorney this 
reserve force is of great service, where he is liable at any time to 
be obliged to stand the strain of a long and exhausting trial. 



ROBERTSON HONEY, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Robertson Honey was born in Alabama in 1870, and at an 
early age removed to Newport, where he received his education 
in private and public schools. He entered Harvard University 
in 1886, but spent the following two years studying in Germany 
and France. On returning to his home he secured, by competi- 
tive examination, an appointment as Cadet in the United States 
Military Academy at West Point, from which he was graduated 
in 1893 in the artillery branch of the army. Subsequently to 
joining the Third Regiment of Artillery he read law during 
leisure moments while serving in Florida, Georgia and the south. 

After being transferred to the Fourth Regiment of Artillery, 
he was stationed at Baltimore, Maryland, and attended the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Law School during such of his hours as were 
not consumed in performing the duties of Adjutant of the Post, 
to which office he had meanwhile been appointed. 

From the University of Maryland he was graduated in 1896 
and was admitted to the Maryland Bar in January of that year. 

He was appointed in 1895 to be an Instructor in French and 



r 



• S; 



Spanish at the United States Military Academy, West Point, but 
declined. The following year he was appointed an Instructor in 
Law, at the same institution, and accepted, and served one year 
in that capacity, resignirfg his commission to become an assistant 
to Curtis, Mallet-Prevost & Colt, of this city. He was admitted 
to the New York Bar in January, 1898. He is the only son of 
Col. Samuel R. Honey, of Newport, R. I., who was at one time 
Lieutenant-Governor of that State, and for four years the Rhode 
Island member of the Democratic National Committee. 



GERALD HULL GRAY, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Gerald Hull Gray was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, 
September 20, 1866, and is the son of John F. S. Gray, deceased, 
who served as Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General on Gen- 
eral Camby’s staff during the Civil War. Mr. Gray’s grand- 
father, John F. Gray, was a famous homeopathic physician in 
New York City fifty years ago. 

^Ir. Gray received his education at St. John’s School, Sing 
Sing, N. Y., and the Roxbury Latin School, Roxbury, Mass., 
and entered Harvard College in 1885. After three years he left 
college, and after traveling abroad was married in Florence, Italy, 
IMay, 1889. 

He returned to this country and studied law, graduating from 
the Harvard Law School in 1892. In October, 1893, he returned 
to New York and was appointed Secretary to the late Justice 
Sedgwick of the Supreme Court. In 1895 he was admitted to 
the Bar of New York and has since practiced his profession at 
No. 26 Exchange place, with James G. Janeway and Appleton 
L. Clark. 

]\Ir. Gray is a member of the Tammany Hall General Com- 
mittee, Twenty-fifth District, and a member of the Democratic, 
Manhattan, Players and Harvard Clubs of New York; of the 
Somerset Club 'of Boston; a member of the New York Society 
of the Cincinnati, the St. Nicholas Society, and Bar Association. 
He is a descendant of Silas Gray, Captain of the Fourth New 
York Regiment in the Revolutionary War. 



ROBERT TOWNSEND, 



ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Robert Townsend was born in the old Townsend Home- 
stead, at Oyster Bay, Long Island, the third son of the late Solo- 
mon Townsend, who was for fifty years a merchant of this city. 
Mr. Townsend w^as educated at Columbia Grammar School and 
entered Columbia College in the Class of ’76. He was presented 
with the Goodw'ood Cup by his classmates as the most popular 
man of his class. He graduated with the degree of A. B., and 
subsequently took the degree of M. A. He took a course at 
Columbia Law^ School, receiving the degree of LL. B. Com- 
mencing upon the practice of his profession he took an active 
interest in politics, delivering lectures and campaign speeches in 
various parts of the State. He went as a delegate to several State 
Conventions, and wEen Grover Cleveland was elected Governor 
he appointed Mr. Townsend upon his military staff to the posi- 
tion of Aide-de-Camp, with the rank of Colonel. He also served 
upon the staff of Governor Hill. Colonel Townsend was ap- 
pointed Deputy Assistant District Attorney by Delancey Nicoll 
and made Assistant District Attorney of New York County by 
the late Colonel John R. Eellow's. 

During the terms of these two District Attorneys Mr. Town- 
send tried several thousand criminal cases, many of them being 
of great importance. Upon the appointment of William M. K. 
Olcott as District Attorney, i\Ir. Townsend, being a member of 
Tammany Hall, was forced to resign, but upon the election of 
Colonel Asa Bird Gardiner he w^as given his old position. 

Mr. Townsend has been for many years a member of Tam- 
many Hall and also of the Columbian Order. He is a member 
of the Seneca Club, in the Tw’enty-fifth Assembly District, and 
for years has been a member of the Democratic Club. He is a 
married man, one of the founders of the Seawanhaka-Corinthian 
Yacht Club, and a member of the Delta Psi Fraternity. 



JOHN F. COWAN, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Deputy Assistant District Attorney John F. Cowan was 
born at Sandy Hook, N. J., in 1866, but has lived in New York 
City since he was three years old. 



Mr. Cowan was educated in the public schools and Cooper 
Union Scientific School. He studied law in the office of Stephen 
P. Nash, and later took a course in the New York Law School, 
from which he was graduated in 1892 with honorable mention. 
He was admitted to the Bar in 1893 and has been in active prac- 
tice since. 

He is Secretary of the Tammany Organization in the Thirty- 
fourth Assembly District, a member of the Democratic and Har- 
lem Rowing Clubs and several other literary and social organiza- 
tions. 

Although social and political ties claim a large part of his 
time Mr. Cowan’s larger life is to be found in the universal in- 
terest he takes in his fellow men, regardless of previous associa- 
tion. When the facts in the case of Ivor}', the alleged dynamiter, 
became known, he caused the introduction of resolutions in the 
District Conventions demanding the intervention of this country 
in behalf of Ivory. This action on his part was one of the step- 
ping stones towards securing Ivory’s release, which was finally 
brought about by the able work in his behalf by Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney Itlclntyre. 

JAMES LINDSAY GORDON, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT .\TTORXEY. 

James Lindsay Gordon, was born in Virginia and educated 
at William and Mary College and the University of Virginia. 
At the age of twenty-six he was elected to the Senate of Virginia, 
where he served three years. He was a member of the Judiciar}-, 
Cities and Public Institutions Committees. Mr. Gordon was a 
Democratic Canvasser-at-Large in the Presidential Campaigns 
of 1888 and 1892, and has spoken in many States of the Union 
in behalf of the Democracy. When David B. Hill was running 
for Governor in 1894, Mr. Gordon, at Mr. Hill’s request, made 
the canvass of Northern New York with him. He has made 
addresses before the Alumni Societies of the University of Vir- 
ginia and William and Mary College, the Graduating Class of 
the University of Vermont, the literary societies of Randolph- 
Macon, the Virginia Society of Atlanta and many after-dinner 
speeches before different associations in New York City. 

In addition to being a ready and a fluent speaker, Mr. Gordon 
expresses himself just as well with the pen. He has the literary 



190 



make-up to that extent that he would have succeeded equally as 
well in an editorial capacity as he does in the law. His position 
as a Deputy Assistant District Attorney ought to give him an 
opportunity to display the qualities of both a lawyer and a writer, 
and it can be safely predicted that he will make the most of his 
talents when the opportunity comes. 

Mr. Gordon has been practicing law in New York since 1893, 
and is a member of the General Committee of Tammany Hall for 
the Twenty-fifth District and of the Democratic, Manhattan and 
Seneca Clubs. 



JAMES W. OSBORNE, 

ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

James \V. Osborne was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, 
on the 5th day of January, 1S59. He is a descendant of a dis- 
tinguished North Carolina family; is the son of the late Judge 
James \Y Osborne of the Circuit Court. His brother was the 
Attorney-General of North Carolina. 

]Mr. Osborne graduated from Davidson College, N. C., in 
1S79, and studied law at Columbia College and graduated there 
in 1885. He was appointed Deputy Assistant District Attorney 
by De Lancey Nicoll in 1892. and was reappointed by Colonel 
Fellows and promoted by him to Chief Deputy and later to 
Assistant District Attorney. He was retained as Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney by District Attorney Olcott under the Republican 
administration. 

He is a member of the Southern Society of New York, the 
Democratic and the Naragansett Clubs. 

In politics he is and always has been a staunch Democrat. 



CHARLES E. F. McCANN, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Among the bright young men now filling positions in the 
new City and County Government is Charles E. F. McCann, 
whom Col. Gardiner, upon assuming office, made a Deputy 
Assistant District Attorney. 

Mr. McCann was born in the city and has resided here ever 
since. He received his education in Columbia Grammar School 
and the College of St. Francis Xavier, where he received the 



degree of “ Ph. B.” He completed his career as a student in 
Columbia University Law School, where he graduated with 
honors, receiving the degree of LL.B. 

He was admitted to the Bar in 1896, and has been in active 
practice since. 

Mr. McCann, although still a young man, and not having the 
long experience of some of his associates, is an observer, a student 
and a worker, and those who know him predict that he will make 
a fine record for himself in his present position. 



HENRY W. UNGER, 

ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Henry W. Unger, born in this city July 3, 1863, re- 
ceived a common school education and took commercial course 
in the City College. At fourteen he entered the law firm of 
Isaac & Sanger, and in five years became managing clerk. Be- 
came attached to the Corporation Counsel’s Office as Stenogra- 
pher. Admitted to the Bar in 1884, when twenty-one. In 1885 
became official Grand Jury Stenographer. In 1887 became as- 
sociated with his former employers in the practice of the law, 
representing various labor organizations. Was appointed Dep- 
uty Assistant District Attorney under De Lancey Nicoll, in 1881, 
acting as his Secretary, Bail and Pardon Clerk. Retained by 
Colonel Bellows, and in 1894 was made Chief Clerk, in which 
position he was retained by District Attorney Olcott. 

Mr. Unger’s faithful and efficient services in the past have 
now been recognized, and under the present municipal adminis- 
tration he is an Assistant District Attorney, and at present in 
charge of the Indictment Bureau. 



EORBES J. HENNESSY, 

deputy ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Eorbes J. Hennessy was born in the City of New York in 
1869. He is the son of the late James S. Hennessy, at one time 
Eire Commissioner of this city. He graduated from the College 
of St. Francis Xavier in 1888, and received the degree of A. M. 
in 1889. He was graduated from Columbia Law School in 1891. 
His studies were pursued in the offices of Anderson & Howland. 



192 



In 1894 he was appointed by Colonel John R. Fellows as an 
assistant in his office, taking charge of writs and recognizances. 
He was afterward designated as Chief of the Bail Department, 
which position he held at the time of the death of Colpnel Fel- 
lows. Mr. Hennessy also assisted Mr. McIntyre in the trial and 
preparation of most of the important homicide cases tried during 
his term, notably the Hannigan, McGown and Koenier cases. 

Colonel Gardiner appointed Mr. Hennessy, on January i,Jo 
the place from which he had resigned upon the appointment of 
Judge Olcott as District Attorney. 

Mr. Hennessy is a member of the Manhattan, New York 
Athletic, Catholic and several other clubs. He is the Secretary 
of the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylums. 



VALENTINE CARLETON, 

CHIEF CLERK, INDICTMENT BUREAU. 

Valentine Carleton, Chief Clerk of the Indictment Bureau, 
was born in London in 1875, and came to this country when four 
months old. He was educated in New York City, attending pri- 
vate schools. He went into the District Attorney’s office, under 
De Lancey Nicoll, in 1890, and has worked himself up to his 
present position. 

Mr. Carleton has probably a larger circle of acquaintances 
among the police of the country than any man in New York, for, 
when a chief or officer calls for the fugitive it is his duty to turn 
the prisoner over to the officer. 



MOSES HERRMAN, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Moses Herrman has been a New Yorker from the time of 
his birth. For twenty-five years he has lived in the Nineteenth 
Ward. He is the son of the late Judge Gerson N. Herrman, and 
was educated in the public schools and the College of the City of 
New York. 

He entered the office of the late Samuel G. Courtney, form- 
erly United States District Attorney, and began the study of 
law; subsequently he graduated from the University of the City 
of New York, receiving the degree of IX.B. 




y Robertson Honey < i^m 

lOEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNE' 









1 Albert E. Bryan 
'private secretary of 



_ THE\ 
DIST RICT A^ORNEY 




194 



Since his admission to the bar he has been in active practice. 
In 1894 Mr. Herrman represented the Twenty-first District of 
this city in the Assembly, and was a member of the Judiciary and 
Education Committees. 

During- his legislative term he introduced a number of im- 
portant bills, notably among which was the one to prevent the 
erection of costly buildings by Savings Banks, the passage of 
which was secured through his efforts. 



ALBERT E. BRYAN. 

Albert E. Bryan, Secretary to the District Attorney, was 
born in Buffalo, N. Y., in 1877. After graduation from the pub- 
lic schools of his native city, he entered into active newspaper 
life. At barely sixteen years young Bryan was doing good work 
on the Buffalo Enquirer, besides fitting himself for a career which 
would enable him to play a larger part in the field he was en- 
gaged in. Coming to New York he soon identified himself with 
Metropolitan journalism, and attracted attention to himself by his 
creditable work as a reporter. It was while acting in this capa- 
city that he was secured by Col. Gardiner, of whom it is said is 
a good judge in picking men for important work. 

EDWARD T. FLYNN. 

Edward T. Flynn, Pardon Clerk of 
the District Attorney’s office, was born 
in this city in the year 1843, re- 

ceived his early education at the pub- 
lic schools. He subsequently entered 
the De La Salle College and afterward 
attended a military institute at Pough- 
keepsie. 

Mr. Flynn was engaged in active 
newspaper work for about twenty-five 
years. At the time of the breaking out 
of the Civil War he served as reporter, correspondent and city 
editor of the Herald. After reaching the position of managing 
editor of the Herald, he was then appointed as managing editor 
of the Telegram, successfully filling that position for a period 
of fourteen years. 




195 



From his position as a successful journalist, Mr. Flynn re- 
ceived the appointment of Chief Clerk of the District Attorney’s 
office. The appointment was made during Mr. Nicoll’s term of 
office, and he so satisfactorily discharged the duties in that ca- 
pacity that when Colonel Fellows assumed the duties of District 
Attorney he immediately re-appointed Mr. Flynn as Chief Clerk. 

Upon the request of Colonel Fellows, later on, Mr. Flynn left 
his office as Chief Clerk to engage in that of private secretary to 
the District Attorney, filling that position to the entire satisfaction 
of Colonel Fellows until the latter’s death. He remained private 
secretary to ex-District Attorney Olcott, but owing to a change in 
politics he retired from that office to make room for a Republican. 

Mr. Flynn has again re-entered the field, and now occupies the 
important position of Pardon Clerk of the District Attorney’s 
Office. 

The position of Pardon Clerk is one of great responsibility, 
and requires a man of ability to successfully manage its affairs. 
Mr. Flynn possesses all the requirements. 

]\Ir. Flynn’s long newspaper experience has been made good 
use of by him. Always liberal minded, his experience has en- 
larged his education and broadened his views and made him a 
man who is always ready to tell what he knows and do what he 
can to further the cause of any one who deserves a good word. 



JOHN J. CONNELL, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

John J. Connell, Deputy Assistant District Attorney was 
born in New York City June 6, 1874. He attended St. Peter’s 
Parochial School and was graduated from De La Salle Institute, 
and later took a post-graduate course in civil engineering. ]Mr. 
Connell also took a special course in civil engineering in Cornell 
University, and in 1894 entered the New York Law School, where 
he graduated in 1896 with the degree of LL. B. 

Thus equipped, he was admitted to the Bar, and immediately 
began the practice of his profession. 

During the last campaign Mr. Connell served in the capacity 
of private secretary to District Attorney Gardiner. His work 
in this temporary field, although limited, was so successful and 
promising that Col. Gardiner decided to give him a better oppor- 
tunity, which he did by appointing him to his present position. 



196 

JAMES J. GRADY, 

ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

James J. Grady was born in New York about forty years ago. 
He received his primary education in the St. Jatnes Parochial 
School and the De La Salle Institute. 

In 1874 he was graduated from the Manhattan College with 
a degree of Bachelor of Arts, a further degree of Master of Arts 
being conferred upon him upon the completion of the required 
college course. 

Upon leaving college Mr. Grady took up the study of law, and 
after several years of study, and during which time he familiarized 
himself thoroughly with law work, he was admitted to the Bar, 
and at once engaged in actual practice with his brother. Senator 
Thomas F. Grady. 

Mr. Grady was for a number of years the instructor in chem- 
istry in the New York Evening High School. His thorough col- 
legiate training and knowledge made him a most desirable teacher 
in this field, and these qualifications, together with his legal train- 
ing, make him well equipped for his present work. 



DANIEL O’REILLY, 

DEPUTY ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 

Daniel O’Reilly, Deputy Assistant District Attorney, was 
born in this city in August, 1869. He attended the public 
schools and was graduated from the College of the City of New 
York and the Columbia Law School. He was admitted to the 
Bar in May of 1892 and has been in practice since. 

In 1894, in place of Philip Wissig, who was withdrawn, he 
received the regular Democratic nomination for the Assembly, 
and although he was defeated by a bare plurality of 73 votes in 
the Republican tidal wave which swept the city, his canvass was 
a victory for himself and his party, for he stands higher in the 
district where he lives than ever, and his present political future 
is all that can be desired. 

Mr. O’Reilly was associated in the practice of criminal law 
with the late Charles W. Brooke, in the Jared Flagg case, James 
B. Gentry case and Hannigan case. Mr. O’Reilly has been as- 
signed by the District Attorney to take charge of the Grand Jury 
and the homicide cases. Among the most important of these 



197 



cases with which he has been connected are the Ferdinsky case, 
the case against Dr. Reynolds, charged with the murder of 
Emeline C. Reynolds, and the case against James Lee, charged 
with causing the death of Laura Booth in the New Amsterdam 



Mr. O’Reilly’s services in the criminal branch of the law have 
so, far shown him to be naturally fitted for this kind of work. He 
is a painstaking and thorough investigator, does not lose his 
head or is easily disturbed. Add to these qualities a quiet and 
unassuming personality, and the total is a make-up that is sure 
to win and hold success in any chosen field. 



Hotel. 




BOARD OF CITY RECORD. 



The Board of City Record is composed of the Mayor, Cor- 
poration Counsel and Comptroller. This Board, by a majority 
vote, appoint a Supervisor, Deputy Supervisor, Accountant, 
Bookkeeper, Stock Clerk and several other assistants to carry 
on the work of the office which, under the provisions of the 
Charter, is briefly as follows : 

To supervise the preparation and publication of the official 
paper of the city, known as the “ City Record,” and to execute 
and supply all orders for printing, stationery and blank books 
required by the Departments of the City Government, under 
contracts entered into by the Board of City Record. 

The work of the Supervisor has greatly increased under con- 
solidation. Previous to January i of this year there were but 
seventy Departments of the City of New York to be supplied 
with printing, stationery and blank books. At the present time 
there are one hundred and sixty-two departments to be furnished 
with the above materials. As this increase in the number of 
Departments has more than doubled the duties of the Supervisor 
some idea of the volume of work done by the office of the City 
Record can be gained. When it is said that all requisitions 
from the City Departments on the Supervisor must be carefully 
scrutinized, with regard to efficiency and economy, it furnishes 
a further insight into the amount of detail work done by the 
Supervisor and his staff and the important connection the office 
has with the work of all the City Departments. 



WILLIAM A. BUTLER, 

SUPERVISOR OF THE CITY RECORD. 

William A. Butler was bom in this city and educated in 
the public schools. At an early age he engaged in the plumbing 
business, doing as large a business as any in that line in this city. 

In 1878 Mr. Butler was appointed Receiver, by the Supreme 
Court, of the Manufacturers and Builders’ Bank, being obliged 
to give a bond to the amount of S6oo,ooo, the largest amount 
that was ever given by any Receiver up to that time, he paying 
the largest dividend that was ever paid to depositors. 







SOLON BERRICK 
DEPUTY SUPERVfSOR 
CITY RECORD 




200 



In 1879 Mr. Butler was nominated and elected County Clerk 
by the Irving Hall party, and in 1882 the Citizens’ party nomin- 
atem him for County Clerk, and though he was opposed by a 
union of the Tammany Hall, County Democracy, Irving Hall 
and Republican parties, he received over 52,000 vote§, which was 
10,000 more than the successful candidate received from Four- 
teenth street to the Bronx, and Mr. Butler carried every Repub- 
lican Assembly District against the Republican candidate. He 
was without any representation or protection at the polls on 
election day, and received as many votes as Gen. B. F. Tracy 
received at the last election, Gen. Tracy having his share of 
canvassers and poll clerks and the regular nomination and an 
increase of double the registration of 1879. 

Since 1883 he has been a member of Tammany Hall, a mem- 
ber of the Democratic Club, is a Trustee of the Union Dime 
Savings Bank, and a life member of the Northeastern Dispensary, 
and a member of several other clubs. 

In January of this year, 1898, he was appointed by Mayor 
Van Wyck Supervisor of the City Record in the Greater New 
York. 

SOLON BERRICK, 

DEPUTY SUPERVISOR OF THE CITY RECORD. 

Solon Berrick was born in the City of New York on Janu- 
ary 18, i860. He began his business career at the early age of 
seven years, when he served morning newspapers over a long 
route, after which he pursued his studies at Grammar School No. 
15 and finished the day by helping to circulate the evening 
papers. Mr. Berrick enjoys the distinction of having sold the 
first copy of the “New York Daily News” ever printed, in 1867. 
In recognition of this the proprietor presented him with a natty 
suit of clothes and cap, on which was inscribed “New York Daily 
News.” 

He graduated from school in 1873, and shortly thereafter en- 
tered the law office of Treadwell Cleveland, Esq., a cousin of 
ex-President Cleveland. Thereafter Mr. Cleveland became a 
partner of the firm of Messrs. Evarts, Southmayd & Choate, Mr. 
Berrick going with Mr. Cleveland and remaining there twelve 
years. 

In 1885, Mr. Berrick graduated from the New York Law 
University, and in 1886 was admitted to the Bar in the First 
Department, receiving special mention. 



201 



From 1892 to 1895 he was connected with the office of the 
Commissioners of Accounts, under Commissioners Michael T. 
Daly and Charles G. F. Wahle, in the capacity of Examiner, 
which office he resigned when the “ Reform Administration ” 
went into power, Mr. Berrick at the time writing a letter to the 
“ Reform Commissioners,” of which the following is an extract : 
“ I hereby tender my resignation as an Examiner in the 
“ office of the Commissioners of Accounts. I deem this a 
“ duty incumbent upon me, actuated by a feeling that I do not 
“ wish to hold a position under a political regime against the 
“ institution of which I voted at the last election.” 

In June of the present year (1898), Mayor Van Wyck ap- 
pointed him Deputy Supervisor of the City Record. 

The office of Deputy Supervisor of the City Record is im- 
portant and one that not only requires a knowledge of the work- 
ings of the different City Departments, but also a knowledge of 
the details connected with publishing, printing and advertising. 
Mr. Berrick — although he has only had the position a few months 
up to this writing — has demonstrated that he is thoroughly 
familiar with the work, and also possesses a capacity for execut- 
ing the same which makes him a valuable man in the place, and 
an able assistant to the head of the Bureau who can be depended 
upon at all times to help carry out the important work of the 
office. 

THOMAS C. COWELL. 

Thomas C. Cowell, Accountant of the 
City Record, was born at Albany, N. Y., in 
the year 1861. He was educated in the 
public schools, graduated from the High 
School in 1880, and took a course of training 
in Folsom’s Business College. He entered 
the Albany County Bank at the foot of the 
ladder, and in ten years’ time occupied the 
position of Paying Teller, which he was 
obliged to relinquish on account of ill health. 
After recuperating for over a year in the 
Catskill Mountains he accepted a position as Bookkeeper in the 
Mutual Reserve Fund Life Association, where he remained three 
years. He was appointed to his present position in 1895, owing 
to his special fitness as expert in the Stationery Department and 
his qualifications as Accountant. 




202 



WASHINGTON H. HETTLER. 

Washington H. Hettler was born in 
New York City, of German parents, No- 
vember I, 1856. He was educated in the 
public schools, and at the early age of four- 
teen started in life for himself. In 1879 he 
launched into business for himself and was 
successful. In 1884 he was appointed Jan- 
itor of the Second District Police Court, 
his first position as a public appointee. He 
then submitted to a Civil Service examin- 
ation for the position he now holds, and 
passed acceptably. Pie was accordingly appointed Store Clerk 
for the “City Record,” which place he has creditably held through 
various City administrations for twelve years. He has always 
been a consistent and pronounced Democrat, and is a mem- 
ber of the Thirteenth Assembly District Tammany organization, 
as well as a prominent adherent of the Royal Arcanum and the 
Knights of Columbia. 

Mr. Plettler is a young man of a sunny disposition and a genial 
nature. He is obliging and considerate with all he comes in con- 
tact, and this, together with his constant light-heartedness, has 
made him a general favorite in public and private walks. 





L 



DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION. 



The Department of Correction has charge of all the penal 
institutions of the city, except jails and places for the detention 
of prisoners in charge of the Sheriff and the Department of 
Police. 

The Commissioner of Correction has all the authority con- 
cerning the care, custody and disposition of criminals and mis- 
demeanants, and it is also his duty to cause all criminals under 
his charge to be classified as far as practicable, so that youthful 
and less hardened offenders shall not be rendered more depraved 
by contact with older and more hardened offenders. The Com- 
missioner may establish and maintain such schools or classes for 
the instruction and training of the inmates of the institutions 
under his charge as may be authorized by the Board of Estimate 
and Apportionment. 

The Department of Correction has government and jurisdic- 
tion over the following institutions : 

City Prison (Tombs), Centre, Franklin and Leonard 
streets. 

Second District Prison, Jefferson Market, Tenth street 
and Sixth avenue. 

Third District Prison, Essex Market, Essex, near Grand 
street. 

Fourth District Prison, East Fifty-seventh street, near 
Third avenue. 

Fifth District Prison, Harlem, One Hundred and Twenty- 
first street and Sylvan place. 

Sixth District Prison, One Hundred and Fifty-eighth 
street, near Third avenue. 

Seventh District Prison, Fifty-third street, between Eighth 
and Ninth avenues. 

Penitentiary, Blackwell’s Island. 

Workhouse, Blackwell’s Island. 

Branch Workhouse, Piker’s Island. 

City Cemetery, Hart’s Island. 

Kings County Penitentiary, Nostrand avenue and Crown 
street, Brooklyn. 



204 



The average census of these institutions is about 5,000, and 
the cost of maintenance, including expenses of governing the 
institutions, about $700,000 a year. 



FRANCIS J. LANTRY. 

COMMISSIONER OF CORRECTION. 

Francis J. Lantry, Commissioner of Correction, was born 
in New York City thirty-nine years ago. He was educated in 
the public and parochial schools, which after leaving he became 
an apprentice to a butcher. 

He continued in the butchering business, became a member 
of the labor organization supported by his craft and represented 
his associates in District Assembly No. 49, Knights of Labor. 

Mr. Lantry is of an athletic make up, and has won many 
prizes in local walking and running contests. This, together 
with his other manly qualities, made him a popular man in his 
district, and leaders of Tammany Hall were not long in recog- 
nizing his abilities. 

Mr. Lantry was the Tammany Hall Captain in the Sixteenth 
District for years, and is now a member of the General Commit- 
tee of the Hall. His first candidacy for public ofifice was in 
1892, when he was elected as an Alderman by a comfortable 
plurality from the Sixteenth District. 

Commissioner Lantry is rated as one of the strongest of the 
district leaders of Tammany Hall. He has carried his district 
by increasing majorities at every election since, in 1892, when it 
was considered a safe Republican District. Many of the leading 
Democrats of New York live in the district, among them Mayor 
Van Wyck. 

N. O. FANNING, 

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF CORRECTION. 

N. O. Fanning, Deputy Commissioner of Correction, was 
born in St. Charles, Illinois, in 1865. He was educated in the 
public schools of his native State and embarked in journalism 
almost immediately after giving up his studies. 

Mr. Fanning came to New York about ten years ago, and, 
until he assumed his present position, has been connected with 
the leading newspapers of this city, both as a writer and editor. 
His last newspaper experience was with the “ Journal,” and at 



206 



the time of his appointment was political news editor of that 
paper, having had charge of that department during the last 
municipal campaign. His work in the above capacity attracted 
much attention during the campaign, both in and out of the 
political field, and at the close of the election his service's were in 
demand. 

Without any solicitation on his part the position of Deputy 
Commissioner of Correction was offered him, and although up 
to that time he had not held any official place, his ability and 
fitness to fill an important office were at once recognized. Mr. 
Fanning’s last newspaper position required him to deal with a 
greater number of subjects than fall to the lot of most men. His 
directness, thoroughness and general e.xecutive capacity in hand- 
ling matters and men which he displayed at the time have stood 
him in good stead in his present position. And to these qualities 
the loyalty which is inborn in every true newspaper man, and the 
above throws a strong side-light on !Mr. Fanning’s capacity and 
character. 



JAMES J. KIRWIN, 

DEl^UTY COMMISSIONER OF CORRECTION. 

James J. Kirwin, Deputy Commissioner 
of Correction for the Boroughs of Brooklyn 
and Queens, was born in Brooklyn in 1858. 
He was educated at the Christian Brothers’ 
Institute and St. John’s College, Brooklyn, 
and entered at once into the publishing busi- 
ness after his graduation from the latter col- 
lege. 

Mr. Kirwin’s business and taste has 
always kept him in touch with educational 
work. Although a Democrat, Mayor 
Schieren recognized his fitness for the position and appointed 
him a member of the Board of Education in 1894. Mr. Kirwin 
remained a member of this Board through the terms of both 
Mayors Schieren and Wurster, but resigned on the ist of Janu- 
ary, 1898, at which time he was appointed Deputy Commissioner 
of Correction for the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. 

The above appointment was made by Mayor Van Wyck 
solely upon Mr. Kirwin’s record as a business man and a faithful 
city official, and the fact that he has thus been recognized by both 




207 



parties is evidence enough of the feeling that exists for him in 
his native city. 

ARTHUR PHILLIPS. 

Arthur Phillips, Secretary, Department of Correction, 
born in New York City October 3, 1850. He was educated at 
public and private schools, after which he entered upon a mer- 
cantile life, and was for some time with A. T. Stewart & Co., in 
their wholesale department. 

Mr. Phillips was appointed Clerk in the Department of Pub- 
lic Charities and Correction November, 1872; promoted to 
Assistant Secretary December, 1880, and when the Department 
was abolished and the Departments of Public Charities and of 
Correction were established on January i, 1896, was made Sec- 
retary of the Department of Correction. 

Mr. Phillips is familiar with every important detail of the 
Department of which he acts as Secretary. He is a rapid and in- 
dustrious worker, and there are few men in any walk of life 
who can turn out as clean-cut, correct and intelligible reports as 
the present Secretary of the Department of Correction. 

Mr. Phillips is one of those men who can say a lot in a few 
words without being brusque or short about it. Popular both on 
and off paper. 






I 



CHANGE OF GRADE DAMAGE COMMISSION, 
Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards. 

The Change of Grade Damage Commission for the Twenty- 
third and Twenty-fourth Wards was organized under chapter 
537, Laws of 1893, for the purpose of determining the amount of 
damages to be awarded property-holders in the Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth Wards caused by the deprecable injury to prop- 
erty in that section by the depression of railroad tracks. 

The Change of Grade Damage Commission is in reality a 
temporary court to try the cases brought before them. After the 
hearing has been held on these cases, the Commission fixes upon 
the amount of damages to be awarded. From the decision of the 
Commissioners there is no appeal. Since its inception the Com- 
mission has settled nearly a thousand cases. 



GENERAL JAMES M. VARNUM. 

Gener--\l James M. Varnum, Change of Grade Damage 
Commissioner for the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards, 
is about fifty-five years old and one of the best known lawyers in 
New York. 

Apart from his military career, which is well known, General 
Varnum’s civil record is as follows: In 1879 1880 he was a 

member of the Legislature. Erom 1880 to 1883 a Colonel in 
National Guard and Senior Aide-de-camp to Governor Cornell ; 
in 1881 one of the State Commission at theYorktown Centennial ; 
in 1883 one of the managing committee of Celebration of Centen- 
nial of Evacuation of New York ; 1889, one of the managing 
committee of Washington Centennial Celebration ; 1889, Repub- 
lican candidate for Attorney-General of the State of New York ; 
1890, Republican candidate for Judge of the Superior Court of 
New York City ; 1891, Permanent Chairman Republican State 
Convention at Rochester ; 1893, Chairman and Manager of the 
Columbian Naval Ball, given by the City of New York to the 
officers of the fleets of the nations at the Madison Square Garden 
(10,000 people present) ; 1893, Chairman of Special Committee 
on Reception of the Infanta Eulalia of Spain, on behalf of the City 



209 



of New York, during her stay in tlie State of New York ; 1894, 
commissioned as Brigadier-General of the National Guard of the 
State of New York by Governor Levi P. Morton ; 1896, com- 
missioned as Grand Marshal of the brigade of about 3,000 law- 
yers of all political parties in the Sound Money Parade in Octo- 
ber, 1896, New York City. 



DANIEL LORD. 

Daniel Lord, Chairman Change of Grade Damage Com- 
mission of the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards, was born 
in New York City in 1846. He was educated in Columbia Col- 
lege and Columbia College Law School. He was admitted to 
the bar in April, 1868, and one month later became a member of 
the law firm of Lord, Day & Lord, of which firm he is now the 
senior member. 

]Mr. Lord, in addition to being a distinguished member of the 
New York Bar, has filled several positions of honor for the City, 
requiring special ser\’ices. These services, which were of such a 
nature that they could only be rendered by a lawyer or a business 
man of high standing and fine capacity, have all been discharged 
with the same ability that Mr. Lord has given to his private prac- 
tice. 

In 1880 jMr. Lord was a member of the Assessment Committee 
appointed by the laws of that year to revise and reduce the assess- 
ments. Among the other members of this committee were Mayor 
Cooper, Comptroller Allan Campbell and Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Works George H. Andrews. 

The result of the work of the committee, it is barely necessary 
to say, was performed to the general satisfaction of the citizens 
and taxpayers of the city. 

i\Ir. Lord, besides being Chairman of the Change of Grade 
Commission, is counsel and a director in the Equitable Life 
Insurance Company, a director in the United States and Fifth 
Avenue Trust Companies, and a member of many clubs and 
societies, including the Union, Metropolitan, University, Man- 
hattan, New York Yacht, Union League, New York Athletic,. 
Lawyers’, Downtown, Rockaway Hunt and Lawrence Clubs. 



14 



210 



WILLIAM E. STILLINGS. 

William E. Stillings, Change of Grade Damage Commis- 
sion for the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards, was born 
in the Twenty-first Ward of New York City in 1857. He was 
educated in the pubic schools and the Claverack Academy, and 
later studied law in the Columbia Law School, from which he 
graduated in 1881. 

After his admission to the Bar he entered immediately upon 
the practice of his profession ; in an independent way struck out 
for himself and continued so until his practice grew so large he 
took in a partner, Lamont McLoughlin, under the name of 
Stillings & McLoughlin. 

Mr. Stillings, who has been the Democratic leader of the 
Twenty-third Assembly District since 1892 — a district with a 
constantly increasing population, much of it of no fixed political 
faith — has nevertheless more than held his own in bringing out 
the full party vote at every election. 

In addition to his present office ]\Ir. Stillings has filled the 
important position of Sheriff’s Counsel during the terms of 
Sheriffs Gorman, Clancy and Sexton. He was also a School 
Trustee of the Twelfth Ward for four years. 

Mr. Stillings is a member of the Tammany Society and a 
member of the General Committee since 1879. He is also a 
member of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution- — being a 
descendant of John Paulding — the Democratic, New York Ath- 
letic, Minqua, Sagamore and Harlem Democratic Clubs. 



BUREAU OF MUNICIPAL STATISTICS. 

The Bureau of Municipal Statistics was created for the pur- 
pose of collecting, keeping and publishing such statistical data 
relating to the city as shall be deemed of utility or interest to the 
City Government or its citizens. 

The Bureau consists of a Chief, appointed by the Mayor for a 
term f 'f four vea’'S. In addition to the Chief the Bureau consists 
of six members, who are appointed with special reference to their 
qualifications to give expert advice upon statistical subjects. 
This Commission, whose term of office is six years, serve without 
pay. 

The Bureau of Municipal Statistics is authorized to publish 
annually, with the approval of the Board of Estimate and Appor- 
tionment, a volume to be known as the Municipal Statistics of 
the City of New York for the year. In this volume the statistical 
commission shall publish the results attending the work of the 
various Departments of the City Government for the preceding 
calendar year, and such other statistical information relating to 
the City of New York or its inhabitants as it may deem of general 
interest. Such publication shall contain statistics relating to 
births, marriages, deaths, the sanitary condition of the city, su- 
pervision of the water supply, parks, streets, pavements, sewers 
and buildings of the city, to the occurrence of fires, the adminis- 
tration of Charities and Correction, administration of the Police 
Department, to the proceedings of the Criminal Courts and offi- 
cers of the City, to the operation of the license laws, to the 
children attending schools and the public schools, to the work of 
the Department of Education, to the population of the city of 
school age, to franchises granted to corporations, to municipal 
revenues and expenditures, to the administration of the various 
City Departrnents having charge of the City moneys, to the 
administration of the Department of Taxes, to the wealth and 
indebtedness of the City, and also a general statement of the 
legislative enactments relating to the government of the City of 
New York. 

The above, in brief, outlines the duties of the Bureau as set 
forth in the Charter of the City of New York. 

The scope of the Bureau of Municipal Statistics, however, is 
a wide one, and in the gathering, collecting and preserving of 



212 



statistics the Chief of the Bureau has much discretionary power. 
In this connection it may be said that although the Bureau did 
not have official habitation until April of this year, it has accom- 
plished considerable work of importance on the lines upon which 
it was established. 

Dr. Nagle, the Chief of the Bureau, and his assistants, have 
been working diligently and the result has been that the work of 
the Bureau is well under way. 

In addition to the new statistical information they have pre- 
pared, the foundation of a fine library has been collected, and 
several new publications are contemplated which will treat of the 
part the City of New York and its inhabitants played in the war 
with Spain. 

On the 25th of last August the iMunicipal Assembly passed 
a joint resolution authorizing the Bureau of Municipal Statistics 
to prepare, in book form, an appropriate souvenir containing a 
full and complete record of the naval victory at Santiago, to- 
gether with a report of the naval parade and reception given by 
the citizens and officials of New York to the victorious fleet on 
August 20 of this year. 

It is intended to publish an edition dc luxe of the above (limited 
to a few copies only) as a souvenir, with the compliments of the 
citizens and officials of New York for presentation to President 
McKinley, Secretary Long and Mayor Van Wyck. 

It is the ultimate purpose of the present Chief of the Bureau 
of Municipal Statistics to so classify and condense the statistical 
information relating to the City Government that any citizen can 
find in the Bureau any important fact connected with the working 
of the City Departments without serious loss of time or trouble. 

In addition to Dr. Nagle the iMunicipal Statistical Commis- 
sion consists of Frederick V. Grube, L.L. D., Harry Payne 
Whitney. Thornton L. Motley. Julius G. Kugelman, Richard T. 
Wilson. Jr., and Ernest Harvier. 

Dr. JOHN T. NAGLE, 

CHIEF, CURE.-\U OF MUNICIPAL STATISTICS. 

Dr. John T. Nagle was born May 7, 1843. He is the son 
of the late Garrett Nagle and Ellen Nagle, nee Croker, and 
brother of Lieut. -Col. Garrett Nagle. U. S. Vols. 

Dr. Nagle was graduated from Grammar School No. 14, in 
East Twenty-seventh street, and his portrait, with the other grad- 



214 



nates, is still on the walls of the school. In 1859 he entered the 
New York Free Academy (College City of New York), graduat- 
ing in medicine in March, 1864; graduated New York Ophthal- 
mic Hospital, 1864, and passed Army Medical Board in New 
York City, April, 1864. 

In May of the same year he was ordered to report to the 
Medical Director of Department of Washington for duty as 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, U. S. A. In June he was ordered to 
Camp Stoneman and assigned to the Third Division and Reserve 
Brigade of Cavalry as Chief Aledical Officer. He accompanied 
this command to the Shenandoah Valley, July 5, 1864, and was 
commended by Colonel Samuel B. M. Young (now Major-Gen- 
eral, U. S. Vols., the first officer placed in charge of Camp 
Wikoff, Montauk Point, L. I.) for conspicuous bravery in action, 
which commendation is on file in the War Department. Later 
he was commissioned Assistant Surgeon of the I92d Regiment 
of Infantry, N. Y. S. Volunteers. 

Dr. Nagle was appointed on the Board of Health, New York 
City, in 1869, as Assistant Sanitary Inspector. He was promoted 
to Sanitary Inspector, Deputy Register of Records and Register 
of Records, Bureau of Vital Statistics, in succession. In January 
of this year he was appointed Chief of the Bureau of Municipal 
Statistics. 

Dr. Nagle is a well-known and popular member of many 
clubs, associations and societies, the principal ones being Amer- 
ican Public Health Association, New York County Medical 
Society, Fellow of the Academy of Medicine, New York Athletic 
Club, Camera Club, New York Medico-Surgical Society, 
Treasurer of the Iroquois Club, Seneca Club and Sagamore of 
the Tammany Society of the Columbian Order. 



THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 



The Board of Assessors was created in 1859 the purpose 
of levying assessments for local improvements. Prior to 1859 the 
Assessors were appointed by the Board of Aldermen for each 
proceeding. Since 1859 the laws governing the Board have been 
practically undisturbed, except as regards its appointing power 
and jurisdiction, which now covers (under the provisions of the 
Charter) the whole of Greater New York. The present Charter 
took this office out of the Department of Taxes and Assessments 
and made it an independent Board, directly under the control of 
the Mayor, who has now the sole power of appointing the mem- 
bers of the Board. 

The Board of Assessors now consists of five members, a 
Secretary and clerks to the number of seventeen. Under the 
administration of the city previous to January i, 1898, the amount 
of business transacted by this Board was about $3,000,000 annu- 
ally. Under the new conditions, which involve five boroughs, 
the transactions of this Board will, from the present indications, 
amount to about $8,000,000 a year. 

The Board of Assessors is the only Board, under the provi- 
sions of the Charter, in which the term of office is not specified. 

The specific duty of this Board is the making of all assess- 
ments other than those required by law to be confirmed by a 
court of record, for local improvements, for which assessments 
may be legally imposed in any part of The City of New York. 

EDWARD McCUE, 

PRESIDENT BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Edward McCue was born in New York 
in 1845. He attended the pubic schools in 
this city, and at the age of sixteen appren- 
ticed himself to a hatter, learning the trade 
and remaining in it just long enough to find 
out he had other qualifications which fitted 
him for a dififerent line of work. 

Mr. McCue became a Clerk of the Spe- 
cial Term, Supreme Court, and discharged 
his duties in the above position so satis- 
factorily that he attracted attention from the 
outside, and in January, 1884, he was ofifered and accepted the 




2i6 



position of Superintendent of the Real Estate Bureau of the 
New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad, remaining with the 
Company for about five years, when he retired to become a 
wholesale lumber dealer. 

In 1895 Mr. McCue was appointed by the Board of Tax Com- 
missioners as an Assessor, and filled the office up to January of 
this year, when he was appointed by Mayor Van Wyck to the 
same position and elected President of the Board. 

In addition to the other positions he has filled Mr. McCue was 
a School Trustee of the Thirteenth Ward for ten years, and in 
this capacity kept in close touch with the personal and political 
events of the ward. This ward has always been a theatre of lively 
politics, and Mr. McCue, as a factor in it, has helped to make — as 
his record shows — a part of its best political history. 

Mr. McCue is a member of the Democratic Club, Tammany 
Hall and the Schnorer Club of the Borough of The Bronx. In 
each of the above organizations he is respected and popular, be- 
cause of his sensible, manly and modest qualities. 



EDWARD CAHILL, 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Edward Cahill was born in Ireland in 1843. Six years 
later he came with his parents to America. They settled in New 
York and the subject of this sketch attended the public schools in 
this city until he was about fourteen years old. 

In 1857 Mr. Cahill went West, and after spending four years 
in that section, came back to New York, where he remained until 
1867. In that year he again -returned to the West and spent the 
following three years in connection with the construction of the 
Union Pacific Railroad, which undertaking he was identified 
ivith at the start and remained with it until completed. 

Since the year 1871 Mr. Cahill has lived in New York City, 
where, in addition to the hotel business in which he has been 
engaged, he has always taken an active part in the Democratic 
party, and at all times has done what he could to promote its 
success. Believing that Tammany Hall was the best medium to 
further the interests of his party, he identified himself with the 
organization. In 1876 he became a member of the Democratic 
State Committee and in 1877 succeeded August Schell in the 
same capacity for that year. In 1883 he was again a member of 



2I8 



tlie committee and remained so until 1886. About this time he 
was also made a member of the Executive Committee of Tam- 
many Hall, having been honored in his appointment by an 
increase in the membership of this committee from twenty-four 
to twenty-five members. 

Air. Cahill was made a member of the Board of Assessors in 
December, 1887, and held that position until November, 1895, 
when he was removed because of the change in the administra- 
tion of the City Government. On January, 1898, however, 
Alayor Van A\Jvck reappointed him as a member of the Board, to 
which he was entitled because of his record for efficiency and a 
natural aptitude for the work which he has always displayed in 
every official act connected with the doings of the Board. 

THOAIAS A. WILSON, 

BO.\RD OF .ASSESSORS. 

Tho.m.as a. W'ilsox was born in Ireland in 1838. He came 
to America when he was ten years of age and settled in Brooklyn, 
where he learned the trade of manufacture of arms, and con- 
tinued at the same in an important capacity for twenty eyars. 
He was also superintendent of a manufacturing concern for ten 
years, and later was connected with a large steel works. 

From i860 to 1865 Air. Wilson was selected by Colonel Hag- 
ner, of the Government Ordnance Bureau, as U. S. Inspector of 
.A.rms. In this capacity he traveled over the entire Eastern divi- 
sion and rendered valuable service to the Government in his 
reports of the condition of the armament of the East. 

In 1881 Air. Whlson was made an Assessor in Brooklyn and 
continued to acr as such for five years, accpiitting himself with 
credit and displaving an ability which attracted the attention of 
Alayor Whitney in 1886, who appointed him President of the 
Board of Assessors. When Alayors Low, Chapin and Boody 
held office Air. Wilson was reappointed President of the Board 
under each of them, and held the office consecutively for eight 
years. 

In 1892 Air. Wilson engaged in a private business, which he 
continued until the ist of January. 1898, when he was made a 
member of the Board of Assessors of Greater New York. Air. 
W'ilson’s record has always been a clean and consistent one, and 
in every position he has held, public and private, has conducted 
it for the best interests of those he has served. 



219 



He commands the respect and confidence of all who know 
him, and his long experience in public life has made him a valu- 
able authority on matters pertaining to the administration of the 
City Government. 



MAJOR PATRICK M. HAVERTY, 

BOAKD OF ASSESSORS. 

Major Haverty was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, in 1830. He was educated at an 
academy in his native city and began his 
career; after graduation, as a bookseller, 
which vocation, in Ireland, is as much of a 
profession as a business. 

He came to America in 1847, and al- 
though some of his experiences have been 
duplicated here and there since that time, 
there are few men living to-day who can 
recall in one life such an unique, varied, in- 
teresting and stirring career. 

In 1849 Major Haverty, in company with a party of pro- 
spectors, went to California, and, after a short sojourn in the 
State, joined another party of explorers who were going to Ore- 
gon. After many months of hardships and privations they 
reached the Umphqua Valley, pitching their tents as the original 
settlers on where the City of Scottsburg, Oregon, now stands. 
They remained in the locality for four months, when Major 
Haverty pulled up stakes and returned to San Francisco. 

While there he became a member of the staff of the news- 
paper owned by Eugene Casserly (who later became Senator in 
that State), and remained in an editorial capacity on the paper 
until the great fire of 1851, which destroyed the city. Major 
Haverty then went to the gold diggings of the State, but after a 
few months returned to New York and engaged in business until 
the breaking out of the Civil War. 

In 1861 he assisted General Thomas F. Meagher in organ- 
izing the Irish Brigade, and went to the front with that body, 
with which he remained in action until the close of hostilities. 
He participated in the Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 
and took part in the battle of Fredericksburg, after which event 
he was breveted with the rank of Major. 





220 



Major Haverty, who has lived continuously in New York City 
since i866, is one of the prominent publishers and booksellers of 
the city, and, in his special line, dealing with Catholic publica- 
tions and books on Ireland, is considered one of the best posted 
men in the country. 

Apart from his regular business. Major Haverty has always 
taken an unselfish interest in public aflairs, and when Mayor 
Grace appointed him a member of the Board of Assessors, in 
1885, his appointment met with general favor. Major Haverty is a 
member of several clubs and societies, and both in these organi- 
zations and private life, is always spoken of as a warm-hearted 
and courtly gentleman. 



WILLIAM H. JASPER, 

SECRETARY BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

William H. Jasper was born in New York City in 1852. 
He graduated from the New York High School and, after a 
short period in which he taught school, read law in the office of 
Jonathan Edgar. 

He entered the Board of Assessors as Chief Clerk and about 
the only employee of the office in 1873. For a number of years 
Mr. Jasper (until the work grew out of all proportion to the 
force) practically conducted the work, executive and clerical, 
alone. 

Mr. Jasper has now passed twenty-five years in the Board of 
Assessors without a break. During that time he has closely 
applied himself to the work on hand, and there is not a detail of 
the duties connected with the Board he is not thoroughly familiar 
with. 

Under the present Charter the Board of Assessors passed out 
of the Department of Taxes and Assessments on January, 1898, 
and was made an independent Board. Mr. Jasper is just as much 
at home under the new order of things and is thoroughly in touch 
with the part his office plays in the make-up of the city govern- 
ment. 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



The head of the Police Department is called the Police Board. 
The Police Board consists of four Commissioners, appointed by 
the Mayor for a term of four years. 

The Charter of New York says that “ no more than two of 
said Commissioners shall, when either of them is appointed, be- 
long to the same political party, or be of the same political 
opinion on State and national politics.” 

The Police Board has control of the government, administra- 
tion, disposition and discipline of the Police Department, of the 
Police force of said Department, and the Bureau of Elections, 
the last named being a part of the Police Department. 

The Police Board has the power to make, adopt and enforce 
rules, orders and regulations and to do all such other acts as 
may be reasonably necessary for the performance of all duties 
of the Police Department. 

The Police force of New York City, Brooklyn, Long Island 
City and Richmond County, including the Park Police of New 
York and Brooklyn, and the Police force of the Brooklyn Bridge 
are now consolidated into one force. 

All Police property, funds and money formerly owned and 
controlled by the cities now consolidated in the City of New 
York, together with the property and money controlled by the 
Park and Bridge Police of these cities is now vested in the City 
of New York, controlled and administered by the Police Board 
of the Police Department. 

The Police Board elect one of their number President and 
another Treasurer. The appropriation for the support and main- 
tenance of the Department is paid by the Comptroller of the City 
on monthy requisitions to the Treasurer of the Police Board, 
whose duties are to pay the salaries of the force and discharge 
obligations. The Treasurer is also the chief purchasing agent 
of the Department. He is under bonds to the City of New York 
for the sum of twenty thousand dollars, the bond to be approved 
by the Comptroller and filed in his office before the Treasurer 
can enter upon the duties of his office. 



222 



BERNARD J. YORK, 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 

Bernard J. York was bom in the Fifth Ward of the late 
City of Brooklyn in the year 1845. The subject of our sketch 
when a boy attended St. James’s Parochial School in Jay street, 
where he attained a preliminary knowledge that, in later years, 
eminently fitted him for the positions of responsibility that he had 
the good fortune to secure. 

At an early age he began the study of law with County Judge 
James Troy, in whose office his attainments were recognized to 
such an extent that he was placed in charge of most intricate law 
cases. 

Resigning from Judge Troy’s office to accept the position of 
Clerk of the Court of Special Sessions of Kings County, he per- 
formed the duties of that position for a period of twenty-five years 
to the satisfaction of the Bench and Bar. 

In 1895 his ability was recognized to such an extent that the 
Democratic Judiciary Convention of Kings County tendered him 
a unanimous nomination as County Judge, and he only failed of 
election by the insignificant number of fifty-nine votes in a total 
vote of the combined political parties bordering on one hundred 
and sixty thousand, in a year when other nominees on the Demo- 
cratic County ticket were defeated by thousands of votes. 

One year later he was requested by the political leaders of the 
Democratic Party to assume charge of the re-enrollment of the 
Democratic voters, who had become hopelessly demoralized by 
their successive defeats;. At the conclusion of his task, and on 
the assembling of the executive members chosen by the delegates 
who represented the sixty-five thousand enrolled Democratic 
voters through the two hundred and ten delegates composing the 
Kings County General Committee, Mr. York was tendered the 
nomination for Chairman of the Executive Committee and unani- 
mously elected, and would again have been re-elected had he so 
desired, but the onerous duties of President of the Police Board 
of Greater New York would be so great that he could not give 
the time necessary to again accept the Chairmanship of the Exec- 
utive Committee. Mr. York, since he has assumed the Presi- 
dency of the Police Board, has shown himself to be one of the 
most able Presidents the Board has had in many years, his keen 
foresight and executive ability has demonstrated itself in many 



wavs. 




Henry E. Abell, 
Police Commissioner. 






i 



224 



JOHN B. SEXTON, 

POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Commissioner Sexton is forty-one years of age; he was born 
in the City of New York and educated in its public schools. 
After leaving school he went into the mineral water business 
with his father and in a few years succeeded to the sole control 
of the business, which he enlarged extensively. He retired from 
business to accept the appointment of Under Sheriff for the 
County of New York. He served in this position under Sheriffs 
Grant, Flack, Sickels, Gorman and Clancey. Sheriff Clancey 
died after serving two months of his term and Governor Roswell 
P. Flower appointed Mr. Sexton Sheriff, which position he filled 
creditably for the balance of the year 1894. On January i, 1898, 
he was appointed by Mayor Van Wyck as a Police Commis- 
sioner. Mr. Sexton is and has been the Tammany Hall leader 
of the Nineteenth Assembly District since the year 1891, and is 
also a very active member of the Democratic Club. 

Commissioner Sexton, who is one of the popular young 
leaders of the Democratic party in this city, is a gentleman of 
rare tact and good judgment. He can always be depended upon 
where the interests of his district and the city-at-large are con- 
cerned, and has a ciuiet, sincere way of doing things which 
commands the confidence and respect of all who know him. 



HENRY E. ABELL, 

POLICE COM.MISSIONEK. 

Henry E. Abell was born in Esperance, Schoharie County, 
New York, June 25, 1837. He is a descendant from a well-known 
New England family, on the side of his father — William Bliss- 
Abell — who was a native of Connecticut. His mother was a 
daughter of William McCarthy, an Irishman, who refugeed from 
Cork during the Rebellion of 1798 and came to the United States. 
Mr. Abell, whose early life was full of hardships and privations,, 
was left an orphan at the age of fourteen, and for the following 
six years he supported himself as best he could. With that self- 
reliance and energy, however, which is found in all good Irish 
and New England blood, he made his way, and alone deserves the 
credit for a career which can be studied to advantage by any 
American youth. From a clerk in a country store in Western 
New York he entered the employ of a bookseller in Albany,. 



225 



whom he afterwards left to take a position in a bank in the same 
city. 

In the latter place he saved enough money to enable him to 
carry out his desire for a better education. 

He resigned from the bank and entered the Delaware Literary 
Institute in Franklin, N. Y. From there he went to the Colum- 
bian University, Washington, D. C., where he finished his gen- 
eral education. 

Mr. Abell’s life from this point has been an exceedingly active, 
industrious and successful one. He read law after leaving col- 
lege, became an editor of a newspaper in 1859 in Delaware 
County, and took a most aggressive part in the campaign that 
resulted in the election of President Lincoln. When the war 
broke out Mr. Abell went to Washington and was sworn into ser- 
vice in defense of the Capitol. He was commissioned by Sec- 
retary Chase to sign the first issue of Government Bonds to meet 
the war expenses and also was assigned to guard and hospital 
duty when not engaged in the Treasury Department. 

In 1864, because of poor health, he resigned his position and 
returned to his native place, where he consolidated two news- 
papers under the name of Schoharie-Union. For the next five 
years Mr. Abell was the editor and publisher of the paper and 
although his office was attacked and he barely escaped being 
killed because of his loyalty to the Union and support of Presi- 
dent Lincoln, he never wavered or changed the policy of his 
paper. 

In 1859 Alonzo B. Cornell appointed Mr. Abell Deputy Sur- 
veyor of the Port. Later he was appointed by ex-President — 
then Collector — Arthur, of the Port, to prosecute violations of 
the navigation laws. In this capacity he succeeded in putting a 
stop to a system of fraud that had long been practiced in the 
registration of vessels. 

In 1879, when Mr. Cornell became Governor of the State, he 
made Mr. Abell his private secretary, and held that position dur- 
ing the Governor’s term. In 1894 he was elected to the Assembly 
by the largest plurality ever received by a candidate in his dis- 
trict. In 1896 he was re-elected to the Legislature and served 
with credit to the State and his party. 

As to his qualifications for Police Commissioner it is only 
necessary to refer to the above record, which speaks for itself. 



'5 



226 



JACOB HESS, 

POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Jacob Hess, who, previous to his appointment to the above 
office a few months ago, had been a member of the Board of Elec- 
trical Control for ten years, was born in Germany forty-seven 
years ago. 

Previous to the above period Mr. Hess has held various pub- 
lic offices, behind all of which he has left a good record. Among 
the other positions he has filled in the City Government were 
Alderman-at-Large (1876), Public School Inspector and Commis- 
sioner of Charities and Correction. In 1875 he was a member of 
the State Assembly. 

Mr. Hess, who is a very popular man and is known to every 
one worth knowing in the life of the city, will enhance — his friends 
say — the regard the public holds for him in his present position. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL WILLIAM H. KIPP. 

CHIEF CLERK, POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Kipp was born in New 
York City in 1839. He attended the public schools and later 
took up a course of study by which he qualified himself for a 
lawyer and an expert accountant. 

In 1857 Lieut. -Col. Kipp became a member of the Seventh 
Regiment, and when the army needed troops in 1861 he went to 
the front as a private with his regiment. 

When the Seventh was called back to New York to suppress 
the Draft Riots in 1863 he returned with them, bearing the title 
of Second Lieutenant. For his services since and the interest he 
has always taken in military matters his promotion to Major and 
later to the position of Lieutenant-Colonel of his regiment was 
a most natural one. 

In civil life Col. Ki^p has spent the last twenty-five years in 
the Police Department, entering the Department in 1873 
succeeding Seth C. Hawley as Chief Clerk in 1884. 

Lieut-Col. Kipp’s record since his connection with the Police 
Department is one of the highest efficiency, and the personnel of 
the different Police Boards with whom he has been associated 
in an official capacity all speak good words of him as a gentleman 
of dignity and character. 

i.. 



227 



WILLIAM S. DEVERY, 

CHIEF OF POLICE. 

William S. Devery was born in New York in 1854. He 
was educated in the public schools, and at twenty-four years of 
age, in 1878, beame a Patrolman on the Police force. 

In 1881 he was promoted to a Roundsman, and three years 
later was made a Sergeant in the Eleventh Precinct. His pro- 
motion to Captain was just as rapid and was justified because of 
the bravery and ability he displayed both in general and special 
Police work. It was during his early career as a Captain that he 
earned special distinction by capturing a band of railroad thieves, 
and later, during the Third Avenue Railroad strike, displayed 
fine abilities as an organizer and a commander. 

Chief Devery, who has now spent twenty years on the Force, 
has been identified since he has been in the service with much of 
the important, difficult and dangerous Police work in the city. 

That he has merited all of his promotions his record shows. 
That he has been successful is evident from the clamor of a class 
of critics who always assail successful men. 

Mr. Devery was appointed Chief of Police by the Police Board 
in May, 1898. Since that time his administration has been equal 
to the best New York has had for a decade. . ■ 





MUNICIPAL CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



CHARLES H. KNOX, 

PRESIDENT OF THE MUNICIPAL CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 

Charles H. Knox was born in the City of New York on 
February 20, 1852, and is now forty-six years of age. 

He belongs to a Colonial family and his ancestors took part 
in the Revolution. 

He was graduated from Columbia College in 1872 and also 
the same year was graduated from the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York. 

In 1876, in conjunction with Henry E. Woodward, he formed 
his present law firm of Knox & Woodward. 

In 1884 he ran for Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, but 
was defeated. 

In 1891 he was appointed a School Commissioner by Mayor 
Grant; in January, 1894, he was elected President of the Board 
of Education; in November, 1S94, he was reappointed a School 
Commissioner by Mayor Gilroy, and in January, 1895, was re- 
elected President of the Board of Education, which office he re- 
signed in June, 1895. 

On the 1st of January, 1S98, he was appointed by Mayor 
Van Wyck a Municipal Civil Service Commissioner and was 
elected by his colleagues the President of the Commission. 

He is a member of the Bar Association of the City of New 
York and of the State and American Bar Associations; also of 
the Lawyers’, Manhattan, Lotos and Democratic Clubs. 



WILLIAM N. DYKMAN, 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER. 

William N. Dykman was born in the Village of Cold 
Spring, on-the-Hudson, in 1854. 

In 1871 he was appointed a Cadet in the U. S. Military Acad- 
emy at West Point, and after his graduation, in 1875, was as- 
signed to the Twenty-second U. S. Infantry, stationed at Fort 
Brady. 



230 



He took part in the campaign against the Sioux Indians that 
followed the Custer massacre in 1876, and after another year in 
the army — during which he saw considerable service — resigned 
to take up the study of law. In 1877 he entered the office’ of W. 
H. Robertson, and after a course of study and reading was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Brooklyn. 

]\Ir. Dykman, who has been in active practice since, is now a 
member of the well-known law firm of Bergen & Dykman, and 
has conducted much of the important litigation for the firm. 
Among the cases that attracted attention in which he was success- 
ful was the litigation of the NewYork and Brooklyn Bridge Trus- 
tees to secure adequate terminal facilities in New York City. 
Mr. Dykman is a member of many clubs and societies in Brook- 
lyn. He is a man of fine social qualities, and this, in addition to 
his military and legal training, together with a taste for good poli- 
tics, has made him one of the popular public figures of Greater 
New York. 



ROBERT E. DEYO, 

jrUNICIPAL CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER. 

Robert E. Deyo was born in New- 
burgh, N. Y., on August 19, 1843. He 
attended the public schools of his native 
place and later entered Princeton University, 
where he was graduated in the class of 1864. 

He then took up the study of law and 
took the course in the Albany Law School, 
from which he was graduated in 1865. He 
was admitted to the Bar the same year and 
returned to New York, where he was en- 
gaged in active practice for over a year. 

In September, 1866, Mr. Deyo came to New York and en- 
tered the office of David Dudley Eield and Dudley Eield as a 
clerk. After a short period in the above employ he went into 
[iractice for himself and continued in this way until 1873, when 
he again became connected with David Dudley Eield under the 
name of Eield & Deyo. Mr. Deyo was associated thereafter 
with Mr. Field, and in all the years they were together there 
grew out of them an ideal law partnership, an unique friendship, 
which was only broken by the death of Mr. Field. 




231 



Mr. Deyo is now the senior member of the firm of Deyo & 
Bauerdorf, and, despite the fact that their practice is an extensive 
and valuable one, Mr. Deyo has found time to take more than a 
passing interest in public affairs. He has never sought a public 
office, but has, nevertheless, served the City and State on occa- 
sions where the work involved required men of the highest char- 
acter and judgment. Mr. Deyo was one of the members of the 
Constitutional Convention in 1894, and his appointment as a 
Civil Service Commissioner in the same year was a slight recog- 
nition of the public services he had heretofore rendered. Mr. 
Deyo is a member of the Democratic and Manhattan Clubs, the 
Alumni of Princeton University, the New York Historical Soci- 
ety and the Huguenot Society of America. 



LEE PHILLIPS, 

SECRETARY CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 

Lee Phillips, the Secretary and Executive Officer of the 
Civil Service Commission, was born in Rensselaer County, New 
York State, where his boyhood days were spent on his father’s 
farm. He went to Troy, where, after studying law for three 
years in the office of the well known lawyers R. A. & F. J. Par- 
menter, was admitted, upon reaching twenty-one years of age, to 
the Bar. He began his practice as first assistant to the Corpora- 
tion Counsel of Troy, and although he soon became one of the 
leading young lawyers of that city, he always had a latent desire 
to try his fortune in a new and broader field, and acting upon this 
desire, came to New York in 1880. 

Mr. Phillips’s career in this city was successful from the 
start. His knowledge of civil and municipal law which he 
brought with him. a mental equipment of a high order, developed 
by close application, soon won him spurs and a prominent 
place in the legal profession. 

Although never an applicant for public office he attracted at- 
tention from the outside by his ability. In 1886 Mayor Grace 
tendered him the appointment to the position which he now 
holds, and which he has filled since that time with the exception 
of an interval of one year under Mayor Grant, and two years 
under Mayor Strong. 

It is needless to say that Mr. Phillips has discharged his 
duties to the satisfaction of the Mayors under whom he has 



232 



T 



served. More than that, he has discharged these duties to the 
satisfaction of a critical press and public as well. 

Mr. Phillips’s position is one of which there can always be a 
close estimate kept of the quality and amount of work performed. 
The records of his office are kept so that they be examined by the 
public at any time, and he is always on hand to further any ex- 
amination necessary. Coming in contact, as he does, with people 
in every walk of life, no public official stands higher. Courteous 
and obliging to every one who does business with the Civil Ser- 
vice Board, carrying the same qualities in social life, it is not too 
much to say that he comes as near the ideal public official and 
gentleman as any one ever meets or cares to meet. 

Mr. Phillips is a member of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, the Colonial Club and the West End Association, and is 
just as popular in these bodies as he is as a city official. 

His name is identified with the Civil Service movement from 
one end of the country to the other, and he is frequently quoted 
as being one of the best informed men on this subject in the 
United States. 




THE NEW EAST RIVER BRIDGE. 

The New East River Bridge is now sufficiently in evidence to 
furnish the public with a few facts concerning the work already 
completed and under way. At the present writing the tower 
foundations on the New York side are practically completed, and 
on the Brooklyn side about three-fourths finished. On both 
sides the anchorage is one-fourth completed, and when this work 
is finally finished and passed upon the work of stringing the cable 
will be begun. 

The approach to the New York end of the bridge, which will 
exceed the approach to the Brooklyn Bridge by over 600 feet, will 
follow the south side of Delancey street thirteen blocks before it 
comes to the street level at Clinton street. On the Brooklyn side 
it will follow a line parallel with South Sixth street to Berry street. 
From there it will extend diagonally across South Fifth street to 
Bedford avenue, and taking in an approach from South Fourth 
street to Broadway the bridge will have an approach of 2,450 feet, 
which is also over 600 feet longer than the Brooklyn Bridge ap- 
proach on that side. The span between the towers will not be 
materially increased in the new bridge, the difference being less 
than 5 feet. Taken as a whole the new bridge will therefore be 
over 1,200 feet longer than the Brooklyn Bridge. The width of 
the bridge will be 118 feet (33 feet wider than the present bridge), 
and the towers 135 feet above the river at the centre, which is 
about the same as the Brooklyn Bridge. 

The law which provided for the building of the present bridge 
was passed by the Legislature in 1895 and went into effect May 
27 of that year. The act required the Mayors of both cities to 
each appoint three persons, who, including themselves, should 
compose a Commission to build a bridge, the cost (which is now 
closely estimated at $12,000,000, three millions less than the 
Brooklyn Bridge), to be equally divided between the two cities, 
over the East river, from Broadway, in Brooklyn, to Grand street, 
in New York. 

Although the above terminals and course of approaches were 
of necessity changed and modified to their present location, this 
change will in nowise interfere with or inconvenience the travel 



234 



from either city. The present location covers practically the 
same territory as originally laid out and will call for the same 
amount and character of travel. What effect the new bridge will 
have on the densely populated East Side district is at present a 
matter of speculation. Whether its inhabitants will take advan- 
tage of the new means of travel and migrate to the suburbs of 
Brooklyn and Queens Boroughs is a puzzle to the citizen who 
has studied the characteristics of the East Side residents. In 
either event, ’however, it is certain that the new bridge will not 
only be of great general benefit to the community, but will also, 
by the character of its travel and the changes which will follow in 
its wake, necessarily improve the living conditions and the prop- 
erty surroundings of what is now the most deplorable section of 
Greater New York. 



LEWIS NIXON, 

PRESIDENT, EAST RIVER BRIDGE COMMISSION. 

Lewis Nixon was born in i86i at Leesburg, Virginia, and 
after receiving a public school education, was appointed a cadet- 
midshipman, at the United States Naval Academy, by General 
Eppa Hunton, then Representative in Congress from Virginia. 

Mr. Nixon was graduated at the head of his class in the Naval 
Academy in 1882. Lie then went to England and took a course 
in naval architecture and marine engineering at the Royal Naval 
College, Greenwich. During his stay in Europe he was assigned 
by the Naval Department of the United States to visit the leading 
ship and armor building plants in England and Erance. In 1884 
he was appointed to the Construction Corps of the United States 
Navy, and a year later was graduated from the Royal Naval 
College. Mr. Nixon’s first work upon his return from Europe 
was in connection with the building of the “ Chicago ” and “ Bos- 
ton.” His knowledge of naval and mechanical architecture in 
this connection resulted in his being ordered to serve on various 
Boards, where he was thus, at the beginning, prominently identi- 
fied with the policy and details of modern naval reconstruction. 
He was appointed to the staff of the Chief Constructor of the 
Navy, serving as Superintending Constructor at Cramp’s ship- 
yard, the New York Navy Yard and later was detailed by the 
Chief Constructor in the spring of i8go to design the battleships 
afterwards named the “ Indiana,” “ Massachusetts ” and “ Ore- 
gon.” 



X 







d.faircH' 



4£cretapV 



'Wis 

PRESIDSM'' 



JM/13 3 ^ioO| 



236 



The above-named battleships, which are everywhere acknowl- 
edged to be the finest fighting machines of 10,000 tons displace- 
ment in existence, were built after plans made by Mr. Nixon 
in ninety days. 

After the designs of the above battleships were made, Mr. 
Nixon resigned from the Navy to accept the position of Superin- 
tending Constructor at Cramp’s shipyard. He remained in this 
capacity until the battleships were launched, and then resigned 
to open a shipyard of his own. Mr. Nixon’s plant, which is at 
Elizabeth, N. J., has turned out in the short time he has been in 
business for himself, the Gunboat “ Annapolis,” the “ Josephine,’^ 
the U. S. S. “ Vixen ” and “ Mangrove,” and the submarine 
torpedo boat “ Holland.” 

Both outside and inside the service Mr. Nixon’s connection 
with the United States Navy has been of an unique character, 
and there is probably no one else in this country who possesses 
so much specific knowledge, combined with a general all-round 
experience in naval matters. He was graduated as a line officer, 
became a member of a staff corps, designed and built ships, and. 
as a private citizen still did work for the Navy Department. 

Mr. Nixon is a member of the Tammany Society, the Society 
of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, the Chamber of Com- 
merce, a Trustee of Webb’s Academy and Home for Ship-build- 
ers, a member of the Democratic and Press Clubs, the Richmond 
County Club, the Army and Navy Club of Washington, and the 
Rittenhouse Club of Philadelphia. 

JULL 4 N D. EAIRCHILD. 

Julian D. Eairchild, President of the Kings County Trust 
Company, was for some years chairman of its Executive Commit- 
tee prior to his election to his present position. He is also treas- 
urer of the New East River Bridge and a director of the Bedford 
Bank of Brooklyn and the Edison Electric Light Company of the 
same city. He has been a resident of Brooklyn since 1875. In 
1895 he was offered the Democratic nomination for Mayor, but 
his business interests would not permit his acceptance. He is 
Vice-President of the Brooklyn Central Dispensary and is a 
member of the Brooklyn, Montauk and Dyker Meadow Golf 
Clubs. He is also a member of the New York Chamber of Com- 
merce and the New York Produce Exchange. He was born in 
Stratford, Conn., April 17, 1850, and at thirteen years of age en- 



237 



tered the employ of a large New Haven hardware manufacturing 
company, remaining with this company for about three years, 
occupying the positions of office boy, entry clerk and assistant 
bookkeeper. 

During these years he saved his money and at the age 
of seventeen started in the tea, cofifee and spice business for 
himself, with a capital of about $400. After remaining in this 
business for a short time he sold out and went into the agricultu- 
ral business, and four years later changing to the manufacture of 
commercial fertilizers as secretary of the Quinnipiac Fertilizer 
Company of New Haven and New London, Conn. He sold out 
his interest in this company in 1874 and became connected with 
the E. Frank Coe Fertilizer Company in New York City and 
eventually became the president of the company. In 1894 he 
disposed of his interest in this company and is now giving his 
attention to the Kings County Trust Company. 



JAMES W. BOYLE, 

VICE-PRESIDENT EAST RIVER BRIDGE COMMISSION. 

James W. Boyle was born in the City of New York May 14, 
1845. His education was received at Mechanics’ Institute, and 
he was, through the death of his father, compelled at the age of 
fifteen to assume charge of his large trucking business. Being 
progressive and enterprising, he entered the wholesale oyster 
business at the age of seventeen. The stripling lad, by persever- 
ance and energy, soon stood in the front ranks of the trade, and 
numbered amongst his patrons the finest hotels and restaurants, 
not only in New York City, but throughout the entire country. 

At an early age he took an active interest in politics and allied 
himself with the Tammany Hall organization. Recogriizing his 
loyalty and ability, he was elected Chairman of Tammany Hall 
Committee, Ninth Assembly District, in 1892, and which, through 
reapportionment, is now the Seventh Assembly District. He has, 
through hard and persistent work, redeemed it from the Repub- 
lican party and made it one of the strongest Democratic districts. 
His faithful services in the cause of Democracy were acknowl- 
edged by Mayor Van Wyck, who honored him by appointment 
as one of the New East River Bridge Commissioners, of which 
body he is Vice-President. 

He has a large circle of social as well as political friends and 



238 

is a member of tlie Democratic, Alanhattan and New York Ath- 
letic Clubs. 



SMITH EDWARD LANE. 

Smith Edward Lane was born in the City of New York on 
the 22(1 of July, 1829. He was descended on his mother’s side 
from a Huguenot refugee nobleman, who settled in New York 
City about the year 1685, and on his father’s side from an 
Englishman, who came to this country about the year 1665. 

At the age of fourteen he entered the University of the City 
of New York and was graduated there in 1848. In June, 1898, 
at the recent annual meeting of the alumni of the University, 
representing the survivors of his class, he delivered the semi- 
centennial address. Mr. Lane was admitted to the Bar of New 
York in 1852, and has since been a practising lawyer in that city, 
where he has always resided. 

Mr. Lane has been actively engaged in politics since 1852, 
having been identified with the Democratic party and frequently 
a delegate to its State conventions from the City of New York. 
He is an old member of the Society of Tammany or Columbian 
Order and a member of the General Committee of Tammany Hall 
for nearly thirty years. He was appointed a Commissioner of 
Parks of the City of New York in 1878 and held the office for 
five years. In this capacity he became well known by displaying 
two traits of character that are well fitted for such a position- — • 
activity and sound judgment. In January, 1898, Mayor Van 
Wyck appointed him as one of the Commissioners of the New 
East River Bridge, and at the organization he was elected its 
Secretary, and is now actively engaged in furthering the work 
of the construction of the bridge. 

For services rendered to the United States of Venezuela in 
1887 the President of that Republic conferred upon him the order 
of El Busto del Libertador, of the class of Officer, and in 1889, 
for further services, he was advanced to the higher class of Com- 
mander. He was also made an honorary foreign member of the 
Government institution, “ La Academia Nacional de la Historia,” 
of Venezuela. He has traveled extensively in this country and 
in Europe, and possesses the polish that comes from having “seen 
the cities of many men.” He is an old and active member of the 
Union Club of the Borough of Manhattan, of the Delta Phi Club, 
of the New York Historical Society, and of many other kindred 



239 



institutions. His family, on both the paternal and maternal 
sides, having continuously resided on the Island of Manhattan 
for more than two hundred years — a remarkable case — he may 
claim to be a genuine New Yorker. 



THOMAS S. MOORE, 

NEW EAST RIVER BRIDGE COMMISSIONER. 

Thomas S. Moore, Commissioner of the New East River 
Bridge, was born in Newburgh, N. Y., in 1842. He was gradu- 
ated from the Lawrence, Mass., Scientific School, and later was 
assistant to Prof. E. M. Hosford, the Rumford Professor of 
Chemistry at Harvard University. 

In the year i860 he came to New York and entered the office 
of Judge Fullerton. He studied law while he attended to his 
clerical duties, and in the year 1863 was graduated and admitted 
to the Bar. 

Mr. Moore, who has been in active practice ever since, and is 
now senior member of a well-known law firm in this City, repre- 
sents as counsellor some of the leading corporations in Greater 
New York. 

The success which he has attained in winning important cases 
involving fine points of law, and his record as an Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney in Kings County, has given him a high standing 
both in official and private circles. 

Mr. Moore, who has always shown public spirit and enthu- 
siasm concerning city works and improvements, was appointed 
an East River Bridge Commissioner by Mayor Van Wyck early 
in 1898. 

Mr. Moore is a member of the Century, University, Lawyers’, 
Brooklyn, Hamilton, Rockaway Hunt and Brooklyn Riding and 
Driving Clubs, and the New York Bar Association. 



JOHN W. WEBER, 

EAST RIVER BRIDGE COMMISSIONER. 

John W. Weber was born in Kingston, N. Y., in 1851. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native place, where he 
remained long enough to equip himself for — which has since 
proven to be — a fine, successful business career. 



240 



In i88i Mr. Weber removed to Brooklyn and embarked in 
the brewing business with William Ulmer and John F. Becker, 
of the William Ulmer Brewery, continuing the business associa- 
tion up to the present time. 

From 1889 to 1895 Mr. Weber was a member of the Brooklyn 
Board of Education, and in his capacity as such was instru- j 

mental in obtaining much needed school accommodation of the | 

Eighteenth, Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Wards of that j 

city. ! 

In 1892 he was one of the Democratic electors which made 
Mr. Cleveland President of the United States. 

In January, 1898, his standing as a citizen and ability as a 
business man were recognized by Mayor Van Wyck, who ap- 
pointed him a member of the New East River Bridge Commis- 
sion. 

Mr. Weber is a member of the Bushwick Club, Parkway Driv- 
ing Club, Arion Society and the Democratic Club of New York. 




1 

i 



THE EXAMINING BOARD OF PLUMBERS. 



The Examining Board of Plumbers was created (chap. 602, 
Laws of 1892, and chap. 622, Laws of 1894) for the purpose of 
examining all applicants desiring to become employing or master 
plumbers. 

The Board is composed of five members, two of them being 
ex officio. One of the ex officio members is by law Chief Inspector 
of Plumbing, Lighting and Ventilation in the Department of 
Buildings. The other ex officio member is Chief Engineer of the 
Department of Sewers. 

The Board meets three days a week and holds sessions at 
which applicants are examined. For this examination a fee of 
$5 is charged, which is turned over to the City. The first meet- 
ing under the present Board was held March i, 1898. Since that 
date the Board has examined 248 applicants. 



JOHN RENEHAN, 

PRESIDENT EXAMINING BOARD OF PLUMBERS. 

John Renehan was born in Ireland forty-eight years ago. 
He came to New York with his parents when -a child, and re- 
ceived a good public school education in this city. For the past 
thirty-five years Mr. Renehan has made New York his business 
home, and in that time he has developed from a plumbers’ appren- 
tice into one of the most expert master workmen and authorities 
in his trade. Much of the important work required in his line 
for hospitals, colleges and schools, both in and out of the city, 
has been done under his plans and supervision, and the attention 
he attracted because of this work has given him a high standing 
in other walks. 

His appointment, therefore, as a member of the Board of 
Plumbers was a natural one, and his election to the Presidency 
of the Board a further recognition of his executive ability. 

Previous to the consolidation of Greater New York Mr. 
Renehan was for one year President of the Village of Far Rock- 
away, two years a Village Trustee, and five years a member of 
16 




‘JOHN RENE^ 



JAMES E.M5GOVERN 
SECRETARY /■ 






examining Board of Plumbers 




243 



the Health Board of that place. Mr. Renehan is^a member of 
the Master Plumbers’ Association of New York, the Mohawk 
Hose of Far Rockaway, and a Tammany Hall Democrat in the 
Twenty-ninth Assembly District. 

EDWARD HALEY, 

TRE.\SURER EXAMINING BOARD OF PLUMBERS. 

Edward Haley was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1855. He 
attended the public schools and St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic 
School in that city, and, after leaving the latter institution, was 
apprenticed to the plumbing trade. 

After learning his trade in all its branches, he worked for a 
number of the best firms in that line in Brooklyn. Desiring to 
go into business for himself, however, he opened up an establish- 
ment of his own and has been successfully engaged as an employ- 
ing plumber since. 

Mr. Haley, who joined the Democratic party in 1876, is a 
member of the Ninth Ward Democratic Club in Brooklyn, and 
has been prominently identified with his party for a number of 
years. 

He was appointed a member of the Examining Board of 
Plumbers on July 13, 1898. 



JAMES E. McGovern, 

SECRETARY EXAMINING BOARD OF PLUMBERS. 

James E. McGovern was born in Greenwich, Conn., July 4, 
1858. He attended the public schools there until 1872. In that 
year he came to New York and entered the plumbing trade as 
an apprentice. He served four years in this capacity and 
attended evening school during sessions of same for that period. 

After learning his trade he became interested in trade associa- 
tions and in this connection has held several important positions, 
among them being President of the New York City Association 
of Journeymen Plumbers, which he held for two terms. He was 
also at one time a member of the Examining Board of Plumbers’ 
National Association. 

In 1893 Mayor Gilroy appointed him a member of the Exam- 
ining Board of Plumbers, and in February, 1898, he was reap- 



L- 



244 



pointed to the same position by Mayor Van Wyck. Apart from 
any official position he has held, Mr. McGovern has, since he be- 
came a journeyman, always had a responsible place in the active 
work connected with his trade, and has been and is at present em- 
ployed as foreman on some of New York’s largest buildings. 

In politics Mr. McGovern is a Democrat. He is a member 
of the Cherokee Club of the Twenty-eighth Assembly District, in 
which he has been a resident for twelve years. 




L. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR. 



The office of Public Administrator of New York is con- 
ducted for the purpose of protecting the interests of creditors 
and next of kin in cases of intestacy where no relatives reside in 
the County. 

The City derives a commission of 5 per cent, on all amounts 
collected by the Bureau up to $2,500, and a commission of 2| 
per cent, on all amounts exceeding that sum. No other charges 
are made by the Bureau and no disbursements are made, except 
for the necessary expenses of administration, there being no fees 
or allowances. Large sums are annually paid by this Bureau into 
the City Treasury for the benefit of the unknown next of kin. 
These remain to a large extent unclaimed and the City derives 
the benefit of the interest thereon, aside from the commissions 
above mentioned. 

During the first six months of the year 1898, $187,529.40 have 
been collected, and $158,517.50 have been disbursed. 

Under the new Charter the jurisdiction of the Bureau has 
been extended to take in the Borough of The Bronx. It formerly 
had jurisdiction only over The City of New York proper. 



WILLIAM M. HOES, 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR. 

William M. Hoes was born at Kinderhook, Columbia 
County, New York; attended the Kinderhook Academy, was 
graduated from Williams College in 1861 ; later attended the 
Columbia College Law School, and was admitted to the Bar 
thereafter and has been engaged in active practice until his ap- 
pointment as Public Administrator. 

Mr. Hoes is of Holland Dutch descent, his father, who died 
at Kinderhook, spoke the Holland Dutch language. 

He is a member and Past Master of Kane Lodge, No. 454, 
F. & A. M.; one of the organizers of the Holland Society; a 
member of the Down Town, Manhattan and Democratic Clubs, 
and of the Association of the Bar. In politics Mr. Hoes is a 
Democrat. 



L_ 



246 



WILLIAM B. DAVENPORT, 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR BROOKLYN. 



William B. Davenport was born in 
the Borough of Manhattan March 10, 
1847. He is descended on his father’s 
side from Rev. John Davenport, who 
founded the New Haven Colony in 1638, 
and on his mother’s side from Joris Van 
Alst, who emigrated from Utrecht in the 
Netherlands, and settled at Flushing 
Bay in 1636. 

In September, 1848, Mr. Davenport’s 
father removed to Brooklyn, where he 

has since resided. 

He was educated at the Brooklyn Polytechnic and was a 
member of the Class of 1867 of Yale College. In 1887 he re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Master of Arts from Yale Univer- 
sity. ! 

He read law and was admitted to the Bar of the State of New 
York in 1870. He has been actively engaged in the practice of 
his profession since that time. 

He was appointed Public Administrator of the County of 
Kings in February, 1889, and reappointed in March, 1894, for 
a term not yet expired. 

He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1894 
and served as a member of the Committee on Cities and on Cor- 
porations. He is a Trustee of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts 
and Sciences and its Treasurer; a Trustee of the Peoples’ Trust 
Company; a Trustee of the Polhemus Memorial Clinic and its 
President; a Trustee of the Kings County Jeffersonian Associa- 
tion and its President; a Director of the American District Tele- 
graph Company; a Director of the Brooklyn New England So- 
ciety and its President; an ex-President of the Long Island Yale- 
Alumni Association and. of the Polytechnic Association. 

He is a member of University and Yale Clubs in the Borough 
of Manhattan, and of Brooklyn, Hamilton, Crescent Athletic and 
Polytechnic Clubs, in the Borough of Brooklyn. 

He is a member of the New York Bar Association, Society 
of the Colonial Wars and Sons of the Revolution. 

He resides at No. 201 Washington Park, in the Borough of 
Brooklyn. ' 




COUNTY CLERK^S OFFICE. 

WILLIAM SOHMER, 

COUNTY CLERK. 

WiLLi.-\M SoHMER was bom at Wurtemberg, Germany, on 
I\[ay 26, 1852. He was scarcely three months old when his father, 
who was a physician and mayor of his native town, died. He left 
a widow with eight children. In 1858' the family emigrated to 
America and settled in this city. 

Young Sohmer was sent to the public schools and also to Dr. 
^linrath’s Academy on Second avenue, where he specially pur- 
sued the study of mathematics and foreign languages. 

It was planned by the family that William should prepare 
himself for the medical profession, but their means were too 
limited to enable him to prosecute his studies, and he took up 
the trade of a piano-maker. For four years he worked at his 
trade and acquired considerable expertness as a mechanic. At 
the end of that period it was deemed advisable by the family that 
in addition to having acquired a trade William should take up 
some mercantile pursuit. 

Accordingly, in 1872, he entered the insurance business. He 
established an agency in the populous section of the city, and 
within a few years his office transacted an enormous volume of 
annual business. The reputation he gained in the insurance 
field soon induced the leading insurance corporations to eagerly 
compete for Mr. Sohmer’s services. 

Mr. Sohmers’s entrance into the field of active politics dates 
back to the year i88c), when he was made the candidate for the 
Assembly in the Tenth District. Representative citizens organ- 
ized a movement in his behalf. In a call which they issued they 
described the man of their choice as follows: 

“ He is not a pronounced partisan nor a politician, but simply 
an intelligent and public-spirited citizen of firm character and 
high motives, who would represent the true interests of the 
people.” 

Tvlr. Sohmer served three successive terms in the Assembly, 
being re-elected by increased majorities each time, and left an 
enviable record. His Anti-Pinkerton bill, which became a law, 



249 



won him the lasting gratitude of the labor element. He voted for 
the Saxton Ballot Reform bill, and was highly commended for 
his ^courageous course by the press' and the public. 

At the end of his third term he was made a Deputy Tax Com- 
missioner. To secure the latter office he was obliged to pass a 
difficult civil service examination. He came out first among 
sixteen competitors. He was appointed in 1893 and held the 
office until 1896, when he resigned to accept the nomination for 
Register. 

His management of the Register’s Office is generally ac- 
knowledged to have been business-like and efficient in the highest 
degree. 

To those who know Mr. Sohmer intimately, he sizes up well 
as a man of character and capacity. He is readily to be ranked 
among the higher type of public men. He possesses strong in- 
tellectual qualities, a firm and upright character, and that public 
experience which fits him for positions requiring executive ability 
of a higher order. 

Mr. Sohmer married in 1872 and has four children. He is 
a member of the Arion, the Eickenkranz, Beethoven, Leider- 
kranz. New York Turn Verein, Century Wheelmen, Democratic 
Club, and a large number of other associations. 

GEORGE H. EAHRBACH. 

George H. Fahrbach was born in New York City on the 
1st day of February, 1863. He entered public life at the age of 
twenty-three; was educated in the common schools of New York 
City. 

His first position was that of Recording Clerk, from 1886 to 
1888, under County Clerk James A. Flack; in 1888 he received 
the appointment of Chief Application Clerk of the Excise Board 
and served under Commissioner Charles H. Woodman until 
1890, when County Clerk P. Joseph Scully appointed him Equity 
Clerk of the Supreme Court, which place he held until January 
I, 1898, when County Clerk William Sohmer appointed him 
Deputy County Clerk. Mr. Fahrbach is married and has one 
child. 



SHERIFFS OFFICE. 

THOMAS J. DUNN, 

SHERIFF OF NEW YORK COUNTY. 

The subject of this sketch is an interesting study. Interest- 
ing to the curious phrenologist, who is fond of weighing up fine 
characteristics and shaping them to see how near he comes to 
Nature’s estimate. The world-at-large, however, needs no one 
to tell it what manner of man the Sheriff of New York County 
is, for he is what artists would call an “ easy study.” There is 
nothing about him that is not as clear as crystal, and there has 
been nothing in his life that does not bear this out. Mr. Dunn 
has lived up to himself at ever}' stage of his career, and that 
career up to date is about as follows : 

He was born forty-eight years ago in Clonmel, Ireland, and 
he comes from good Tipperary stock. His parents were well-to- 
do, and he received a good education in English and mathematics 
in the national schools of his native land. His imagination saw 
America, however, so he landed in New York one fine day about 
thirty years ago. His first work in the new land was done on a 
farm. He soon found something better, however, and joining a 
firm of stone-cutters learned the trade, in which he has since 
carved his way to a fortune. When he had time to take an 
interest in politics, he joined Tammany Hall and became the 
leader of that organization in the old Twentieth District, in 1891. 
When the districts were re-arranged in 1895, and parts of the 
Twentieth and Twenty-second were consolidated with the 
Twenty-sixth, there was no one but Mr. Dunn thought of for 
the leadership. Up in his district every other man gives a differ- 
ent reason for his popularity. ' The phrenologist says that this 
means that the foundation of the Sheriff’s character is heart, and 
with it is linked a combination of qualities which are not common 
in one man. Some of these qualities are simplicity, honesty and 
reliability. Combine with these the general qualities of humor,, 
cheerfulness, a romantic and a poetic temperament and the pic- 
ture is one of a man the world likes to look upon. 

Examples of the use the Sheriff has made of his natural gifts 
are on every hand. His friends (no limit) say that it would 



252 



take a force of recording angels to write his kind acts, and that 
his flashes of wit and humor would make an entertaining book. 

Is it any wonder, then, when he was elected Sheriff of the 
County of New York he polled more votes than both of the other 
candidates? The wonder is that the other candidates consented 
to run. 



HENRY P. MULVANY, 

UNDER SHERIFF. 

Henry P. Mulvany was born in New York City in 1852. 
He attended the public schools of this city, and after a short 
period, in which he served as a messenger boy, learned the steam 
and gas fitting trade. ' 

In 1874 Mr. Mulvany was appointed a Keeper in the Sheriff’s 
Office, under Sheriff Connor. In 1878 he was made a Clerk to 
Deputy Sheriff, under Bernard Reilly, and remained in this capa- 
city during different administrations up to 1891, when he was 
appointed Deputy Sheriff. 

In 1897 he was made Acting Warden of the New York 
County Jail, and in January of this year was appointed Under 
Sheriff. 

Mr. Mulvany is not only thoroughly familiar with his present 
•duties, but his general knowledge of the workings of other City 
Departments has made him a valuable City official. 

Apart from his official duties Mr. Mulvany has found time 
fo associate himself with a number of fraternal societies and 
political clubs, in all of which he is popular and takes a promi- 
nent part. Among these organizations are the A. O. U. W., of 
which he is Past Master; Exalted Ruler of Lodge No. i, B. P. 
O. E.; member of the Democratic Club and Tammany Hall, and 
Secretary of the Tammany Central Association. 

PATRICK H. PICKETT, 

warden new YORK COUNTY JAIL. 

Patrick H. Pickett was born in New York City in 1842. 
He received a common school education, and when he was old 
enough to fight for his country, enlisted in the Tenth Regiment, 
Kew York Volunteers, and went to the front. 

He took part in the battles of Bull Run and Fredericksburg, 
and at the close of the war returned to New York and became 



253 



a member of the Police force. He was appointed on the force 
in 1865, five years later was made a Serg'eant, and a few years 
later was promoted to a Captain. 

He remained in the above capacity for about twenty years, 
serving under eight Superintendents of Police and doing efficient 
Police work in ten precincts. 

Captain Pickett was appointed Warden of Ludlow Street Jail 
early in 1898, and since his appointment has conducted the office 
in a thoroughly business-like manner, to the satisfaction of the 
public and the heads of the City Government with whom he has 
official relations. 



COMMISSIONER OF JURORS. 

CHARLES WELDE, 

COMMISSIONER OF JURORS. 

Charles Welde was born in Stuttgart. 
Germany, on March 22, 1843, attended 
school there until eleven years old, when he 
came with his father to this country in 
1854, and settled in this city. At an early 
age he was apprenticed to the sash and 
blind branch of the carpentering trade; 
while learning his trade he was also edu- 
cating himself by attending night school. 
In 1865, being then twenty-two years old, 
Mr. Welde went into business, and almost 
at once establfshed himself in a prosperous trade; from that time 
until he retired from business in 1888 it is probable that he fur- 
nished more material in his line toward building up Harlem than 
any living man; he built also, and that very extensively. 

He was appointed Police Justice by Mayor Edson in 1884, 
and was reappointed by Mayor Grant in 1892, and served with 
credit until legislated out of office through change of politics. 
He was appointed Commissioner of Jurors by Mayor Van Wyck, 
which position he holds at present. He is leader of the Thirty- 
first Assembly District, a member of the Sagamore Club, Demo- 
cratic Club, and a member of the Tammany Hall Executive 
Committee. 

H. W. GRAY, 

SPECIAI. COMMISSIONER OF JURORS. 

H. W^ Gray was born in New York City 
in 1839. He was educated at private schools 
and the New York University, after which he 
entered the shipping business, in which he 
remained for eight years. 

In 1891 Mr. Gray was appointed a 
Park Commissioner and served the city 
in that capacity for two years. In 1893 
he was made a Eire Commissioner, but re- 
signed a year before Mayor Strong as- 
sumed office. In May, 1896, he was 
appointed Special Commissioner of Jurors. 






255 



Apart from and previous to any official positions he has held, 
Mr. Gray has always been active in a business sense, and is now 
and has been a prominent member of the Stock Exchange for 
many years. 

Mr. Gray is a gentleman who possesses strong social qualities, 
and in this respect has gratified his taste by becoming a member 
of a number of the best clubs in New York. Among the clubs of 
which he is a member are the Union, Knickerbocker, Century, 
Psi Upsilon and Metropolitan Clubs. 

In politics he is and always has been a Democrat. 




REGISTER'S OFFICE. 

ISAAC FROMME. 

Isaac Fromme was born in New York 
City August 4, 1854, and after being gradu- 
ated from Grammar School No. 20, in Chrys- 
tie street, in 1869, entered the College of the 
City of New York, whence he was graduated 
in 1874. Then determining on adopting the 
legal profession he entered Columbia Law 
School and at the same time served in the of- 
fice of a law firm in the city, thus acquiring 
at once a knowledge of the theoretical and 
practical details of his chosen profession. He 
completed his studies at Columbia in 1876 and at once entered on 
his profession, in which from the first day he has been successful. 
He now, after nearly a quarter of a century’s active business en- 
joys a large and lucrative practice and numbers among his clients 
the largest business and mercantile houses in this city, including 
large real estate interests. 

His predecessor was hampered by the Reform Administration 
in the discharge of the duties of his office, but with the co-opera- 
tion and assistance of a friendly administration Mr. Fromme was 
enabled to dispose of 6,000 unrecorded deeds and mortgages and 
3,500 satisfaction pieces, thus enabling him to keep up with the 
daily work of the office and returning papers in twenty-four and 
forty-eight hours. Register Fromme has made the office adapt it- 
self to the convenience and interests of the lawyers and real estate 
men who do business with said office. As a result of his labors 
Mr. Fromme has received almost daily congratulatory letters 
from distinguished lawyers and others interested in the affairs of 
the Register’s Office. This was effectively voiced in an editorial 
in The Record and Guide of February 5, 1898, which said: “ Real 
estate men and lawyers are already commenting with satisfaction 
upon the administration of the new Register, Mr. Isaac Fromme. 
He has in great measure reorganized the Department, in ad- 
dition to establishing a very much higher standard of require- 
ment for his force than has hitherto prevailed. We are able tO’ 
vouch for the fact that now, for the first time within our knowl- 




257 



edge of thirty years, the work of the office is completely finished 
every day, so that nothing is carried over. This is a great con- 
venience for lawyers and others. It proves what was stated in 
these columns when Mr. Fromme was nominated, that the Reg- 
ister’s Office can only be conducted by some one intimately ac- 
quainted, as Mr. Fromme is, with the requirements of the legal 
and real estate professions. Mr. Fromme is one of the good re- 
sults of the late election.” 

Mr. Fromme is a prominent Mason. Fie is a member of 
Hope Lodge No. 244, F. & A. M., was last District Deputy 
of 5,162 Masons, and has just been appointed Grand Marshal 
of the Grand Lodge of IMasons of the State of New York. 
Is Past Grand Master of the Lodge of Perfection, Scottish 
Rite Masons; a member of all the Scottish Rite bodies 
and of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of Mount 
Horeb Lodge, Free Sons of Israel, No. 61, is the Past President 
of Zion Lodge No. 2 of the Independent Order of B’nai Brith; 
is an ex-Governor of the Home for Aged Hebrews, at Yonkers; 
is a member of the West Side Association and the West End 
Club, the Progress Club, and also of IMount Sinai Hospital, 
Montefiore Home, the German Society of New York and the 
Elizabeth Home. He is also a member of the City College Club, 
of the Columbian Order or Tammany Society, the Democratic 
Club; is a member of the Committee on Flunicipal Affairs and of 
the Executive Committee of Tammany Hall, on the Committee on 
Organization of the Nineteenth and Twenty-first Assembly Dis- 
tricts, a member of the Pontiac and Narragansett Clubs, and or- 
ganized the Pontiac Building Company and the Narragansett 
Building Company. He is also very popular with the principals 
of the public schools of the City of New York and persons in- 
terested in public school education, in which he has always 
taken an active interest. He has a host of warm personal friends 
and a strong following of distinguished citizens. 

Register Fromme is fortunate in his domestic life and 
has a most happy home. He is married and has five children, 
three boys and two girls. 

The foregoing gives an idea of the character of a man who 
holds so high a position in political and social life. 



n 



JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 



Judge Abraham R. LAWRE^•CE was born in this city in 1832. 
He was educated at a private school and read law with his father 
until 1854, when he was admitted to the Bar. In 1867 he was 
elected a member of the Constitutional Convention and in 1873 
was nominated and elected a Judge of the Superior Court. He 
was elected a Supreme Court Judge in 1874 and re-elected in 
1887 for a term of fourteen years. 

Judge Charles H. Truax was born in Oneida County in 
1846. He attended the public schools, the Oneida Seminary and 
Hamilton College, receiving from the latter the degrees of iMaster 
of Arts and Doctor of Laws. 

He removed to New York in 1868, and after his admission to 
the Bar, engaged in the actual practice of his profession until 
1880. In that year he was elected Judge of the Supreme Court 
for a term of fourteen years. In the fall of 1895 he was elected 
to the Supreme Court for the First Judicial District, beginning 
January, 1896. 

He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1894. 

Judge Charles F. MacLe.\n was born in New York fifty- 
one years ago. He received his early education in this city and 
later entered Yale College, from which he was graduated. In 
1879 he was appointed a Police Commissioner and served with 
credit on the Board for one year when he was made a Park 
Commissioner. In 1882 he was re-appointed a Police Commis- 
sioner and served as such for a number of years. In 1888 he 
was again appointed to the same position and remained a mem- 
ber of the Board until 1894. In 1895 he was counsel to Sheriff 
Tamsen and the following year was elected a Judge of the 
Supreme Court for a term of fourteen years. 

Judge Frederick Smvtii, of the Supreme Court, was born 
in County Galway. Ireland, aliout fifty-five years ago. He came 
to New York when he was a young man and studied law in the 
office of John McKeon. In 1879 he was selected as Recorder of 
the General Sessions by the Board of Aldermen and elected for 
the same office in 1880. 




rMNcisM'^cofr 






/i.J. 0'df\iE/i 



/^Hl^WpENC^ 



O.IJngraham 



PM.Duoro 



D. /%4DA/i 



'~^C£p/fA^ 



26o 



He was defeated for the above office in 1895 on the Demo- 
cratic ticket, but elected to the Supreme Court Bench in 1897, 
when his party was victorious in the election of officials for 
Greater New York. 

Justice Joseph F. Daly was elected upon the regular Demo- 
cratic ticket to the foimer Court of Common Pleas in 1870 and 
1884. By the constitutional consolidation of Courts in 1896 he 
became a Justice of the Supreme Court. 

Justice Daly was born in Plymouth, North Carolina, on De- 
cember 3, 1840. He is the son of Captain Denis Daly, formerly 
of Limerick, Ireland, and a brother of Augustin Daly, the man- 
ager and dramatist. 

Miles Beach was born in 1833. His father, the late Hon. 
William A. Beach, was one of the prominent leaders of the Bar, 
and from him Mr. Beach inherited a natural taste of the law. 

Judge Beach graduated from Union College in 1854, studied 
law in the office of his father, and in 1871 became a partner with 
his father in a prominent law firm in this city. 

In 1879 Governor Robinson appointed him Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas, to succeed Judge Robinson, deceased. 
In 1893 he was elected Judge to the same Court for the full term 
of fourteen years, but the following year was transferred, through 
the consolidation of the Courts, to the Supreme Court Bench. 

Judge Roger A. Pryor was born in Virginia in 1828. He 
was graduated from the Hampden Sidney College, in his State, 
at the head of his class, took up the study and was admitted to 
the Bar, but, instead of taking up active practice, entered journal- 
ism. 

In his newspaper career he has been editor of the Petersburg 
Southside Democrat, Washington Union and the Richmond En- 
quirer. In 1855 he was appointed by President Pierce on a spe- 
cial diplomatic mission to Greece. In 1857 he was elected to 
Congress from his State and in 1858 was re-elected. 

After Virginia had seceded from the Union he remained loyal 
to his State and was elected a member of the first Confederate 
Congress. During the war he was a Colonel and later a General 
in the Gonfederate Army, but resigned his command for political 
reasons and re-enlisted as a private in 1864. He was captured 
and confined in Fort Lafayette, N. Y., removing to New York 
City after his liberation, and began the study of law again at 



26i 



thirty-five years of age. His practice soon became a large one 
and he was identified as counsel with important cases. Among 
the cases which attracted the most attention was the Beecher 
trial, in which he was counsel for Theodore Tilton. 

In 1890 he was appointed to the Bench of Common Pleas by 
Governor Hill and the following year was elected to succeed him- 
self. 

In 1896, by the Consolidation Act of 1894, he was transferred 
to the Supreme Court Bench. 

Judge Leonard A. Geigerich was born in Bavaria in 1855 
and came, when one year old, with his parents to this country. 
He was educated in the public schools, St. Nicholas Parochial 
School and the De la Salle Institute, and after a course at the 
latter college studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1877. 

In 1886 he was elected to the State Assembly and the follow- 
ing year was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue for the 
Third District. In 1890 Governor Hill appointed him Judge of 
the City Court to succeed Judge Nehrbas (deceased), and the 
following year was elected County Clerk, which office he resigned 
to succeed Judge Allen in the Court of Common Pleas. In 1892 
he was nominated by both parties to succeed himself for a term 
of fourteen years. In 1896, by the Consolidation Act of 1894, he 
was transferred to the Supreme Court Bench. 

Justice Henry W. Bookstaver was born in 1835. He re- 
ceived his early education at an academy in Orange County and 
prepared himself for Rutgers College, from which he was gradu- 
ated with honors. 

He was admitted to the Bar in 1861 and later became a mem- 
ber of the law firm of Brown, Hull & Vanderpoel. 

Among the official places he has filled previous to his election 
to the Bench of the Supreme Court are Sheriff’s Attorney, Coun- 
sel to the Police Board and Counsel to the Commissioner of 
Charities and Correction. 

Justice Henry Rutgers Beekman is of Dutch ancestry 
and was born in the City of New York in December, 1845. He 
received his education at Columbia College, graduating in 1865. 
After a course in the law school of that institution he was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1867, where he continued the active practice 
of his profession until his elevation to the Bench in 1894. 

In 1884 he was appointed Park Commissioner by Mayor 



262 



Grace. In 1886 he was elected President of the Board of Aider- 
men and at the expiration of a year’s service in that capacity he 
was appointed Counsel to the Corporation by Mayor Hewitt. 

In 1889 Governor Hill named him as one of the Commis- 
sioners for the Promotion of Uniformity of Legislation in the 
United States, in which work he was actively engaged until his 
election as Judge. 

Justice Beekman was elected Judge of the Superior Court of 
the City of New York in November, 1894, on the union ticket 
headed by Mayor Strong. Upon the consolidation of the courts 
under the new Constitution, January i, 1896, he became a Justice 
of the Supreme Court in the First Department. 

Judge Hexrv A. Cildersleeve was born in 1840. He 
received a good school education, and when the Union Army 
needed troops in the Civil War he recruited a company of volun- 
teers in 1862 and went to the front. 

He participated in the battle of Gettysburg and later was 
assigned to special duty, but, recpiesting active service, he joined 
Sherman’s force and was with him until the close of the war. 

Upon his return to civil life he was made Lieutenant-Colonel 
of the Twelfth Regiment, incorporated the National Rifle Asso- 
ciation, and in 1875 was appointed Captain of the American 
Rifles, who were sent to Ireland in 1875. 

Previous to this time he had studied law and was graduated 
from Columbia College Law School in 1866. In 1875 
elected Judge of the Court of General Sessions, and in May, 1891, 
after his term in the above Court had expired. Governor Hill 
appointed him Judge of the Superior Court. In 1892 he was 
elected to the Bench for fourteen years, and when the Court of 
Common Pleas was abolished, was transferred to the Supreme 
Court. 

Judge Fr.vncis iM. Scott was born in 1848. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and College of the City of New York, 
graduating from the latter college in 1867. In that year he 
entered Columbia College Law School and two years later 
received his diploma. 

In 1885 he was appointed First Assistant Corporation Coun- 
sel and remained in that capacity until 1888. In 1895 iMayor 
Strong appointed him Corporation Counsel, in which position 
he performed good service for the City. In 1897 he was elected 
on the Democratic ticket to the Supreme Court Bench. 



263 



Judge Henrv Bischoff, Jr., was born in 1852. He attended 
the public schools of New York, graduated from the Bloomfield 
Academy of Bloomfield, N. J., and finished his general education 
under a private tutor. 

In 1871 he graduated from Columbia College Law School 
and two years later was admitted to the Bar and at once acquired 
a large practice, consisting largely of important civil cases. 

In 1879 he was appointed Collector of Arrears of Personal 
Taxes and held the post until he was elected Judge of the Court 
of Common Pleas in 1889. In 1894, when this Court was abol- 
ished, he became Supreme Court Judge. 

Judge John J. Friedman was born in Nuremberg, Germany, 
in 1835. He came to New York when he was sixteen years old, 
and, after studying law for a number of years, was admitted to 
the Bar in i860. He soon acquired a large practice, particularly 
among the Germans, and for nearly ten years was the counsel 
for many of his countrymen who were at the head of important 
business interests. In 1869 Governor Hoffman appointed him 
Judge of the Superior Court, and when his term expired was 
elected to the same position for a term of six years. 

In 1876 he was elected for a term of fourteen years to succeed 
Judge Monell. In 1890 he was again elected, and in 1896, when 
the Courts were consolidated, he became Judge of the Supreme 
Court. 

Judge William N. Cohen was born in New York City m 
1859. He attended the public schools and at thirteen years of 
age entered a law office as an errand boy. When he was seven- 
teen he entered Dartmouth College, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1879. He returned to New York and attended Columbia 
College Law School. In 1881 he was admitted to the Bar and 
TWO years later became a member of a well-known law firm. 

In 1897 he was appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court to 
fill the vacancy caused by the death of Justice Sedgwick. 

Judge P. Henry Dugro was born in New York City in 1855. 
He was educated in Columbia College and Law School, and in 
1878 was admitted to the Bar. When he was but twenty-seven 
years old he was elected to the Assembly. In November, 1880, 
he ran against William Waldorf Astor for Congress and was 
elected. He was elected a Judge of the Superior Court in 1887 
for a term of fourteen years, and in 1894, when the Courts were 
consolidated, he became a Judge of the Supreme Court. 



1 



264 



Judge David McAdam was born in New York October, 
1838. He attended the city schools until he was eleven years 
old, at which age he entered a lawyer’s office, read law in his 
spare moments and finally became managing clerk for his em- 
ployer. He was admitted to the bar in 1859 soon attained a 
lucrative practice. 

In 1873 he received the Democratic nomination for Judge of 
the Marine Court and was elected by a large plurality. He was 
re-elected in 1879, and in January, 1884, he was chosen Chief 
Justice by his associates. During this period — principally 
through his efforts — the jurisdiction of the Court was enlarged 
and its name changed to City Court. 

In 1885 he was re-elected for a third term, but did not serve 
for a full term, owing to the fact that he was elected Justice ot 
the Superior Court. When the Consolidation Act of 1894 con- 
solidated the courts he became Justice of the Supreme Court. 

Judge McAdam is the author of several standard works on 
the law, and in addition to his literary ability is an eloquent and 
engaging speaker and lecturer. 

APPELLATE DIVISION. 

Judge Morgan J. O’Brien was born in this City in 1852. 
He received his first education in the public schools and later 
attended the Christian Brothers, from which he was graduated. 
In 1872 he took a course in St. John’s College, Fordham, and 
also took a post-graduate course at St. Francis Xavier, where he 
received the degree of Master of Arts. In 1889 he was given the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from St. John’s College. He read law 
while attending college and entered Columbia College Law 
School. He was admitted to the Bar in May, 1875. He at once 
opened up a law office, and as counsel for large property-holders 
and others built up a fine practice. 

In 1887 he was made ‘Corporation Counsel of the City and in 
1888 was elected Associate Justice of the Superior Court. In 
1892 he was assigned by Governor Hill as one of the Justices of 
the General Term in the First District, which position he filled 
until selected by Governor Morton as Justice in the Appellate 
Division of the Supreme Court, his term on the Bench of this 
Court being five years from January i, 1896. 

Judge George C. Barrett was born in Ireland in 1838. He 
is the son of a prominent clergyman who removed to Canada, 




L.A.Giegerich. 



^•I^Sookstav^^ 



Miles Beach 



H.R.Beekman4 



C.HTRUAX 



f^A.PRyo^ 






J.F.DALY. 




266 



and where Judge Barrett received his early education. Remov- 
ing to New "^.'ork he entered Columbia College Grammar School 
and Columbia College, leaving the latter institution to take up 
the study of la\v. 

After his admission to the Bar, Judge Barrett practiced law 
successfully up to the time of his election as Judge of the Sixth 
Judicial Court. In 1869 he was elected Judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas, and two years later was elected a Justice of the 
Supreme Court. In 1885 he was re-elected to the same position 
for a term of fourteen years. 

Judge William Rumsey, of the Appellate Division of the 
Supreme Court, was born in Bath, New York, about fifty-five 
years ago. He is the son of Judge David Rumsey, well known 
in his time as a distinguished lawyer and jurist. 

Judge Rumsey left Williams College the year before he was 
to graduate to enter the Army. He distinguished himself by 
meritorious services, and in 1865 he was mustered out with the 
rank of Colonel. Two years later he was appointed Secretary of 
the Legation to the ^Minister to Japan, and after his return from 
the Orient took up the study of law. He was admitted to the 
Bar in 1870, and, upon the retirement of his father, was elected 
Justice of the Supreme Court in the Seventh District. 

In 1893 he was appointed Judge, by Governor Morton, in the 
Appellate Division. 

Judge Chester B. ]\IcL,aughlin was born in Moriah, New 
York, about forty years ago. He was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Vermont in 1879, and in 1881 was admitted to the Bar. 

In 1891 he was elected County Judge. In 1894 was a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention and took an active and 
important part in the proceedings of that Body. 

In 1895 Judge McLaughlin was elected to the Supreme Court 
Bench, and now sits in the Appellate Division. 

Judge George L. Ingraham, of the Appellate Division, 
Supreme Court, was born in this city in 1847. He comes from 
a family distinguished in the law, his father having been the 
predecessor of Judge Noah Davis on the Supreme Court Bench. 

Judge Ingraham studied law in the office of his father, and 
was graduated from Columbia College Law School in 1869. In 
1882 he was elected Judge of the Superior Court and later was 
transferred from this Court to the Supreme Court, to fill the 



26; 



vacancy caused by the death of Judge Van \*orst. In 1891 he 
was elected to the Supreme Court and is now one of the seven 
Judges in the Appellate Division. 

Judge Charles H. \'ax Brunt, of the Supreme Court, was 
born in Bay Ridge, Long Island, in 1836. In 1856 he was 
graduated from the University of the City of New York. After 
his admission to the Bar in i860 he was associated for a number 
of years with the late Governor Hoffman, and continued in active 
practice up to the time of his appointment to the Bench in 1869. 
In that year he was appointed Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, to succeed Judge Brady, and in 1870 was elected to suc- 
ceed himself for a term of fourteen years. In 1883 he was 
elected to the Supreme Court Bench and is now Presiding 
Justice of the Appellate Division. 

Judge Van Brunt is a member of the Manhattan and Lotus 
Clubs and the St. Nicholas Society, and is also one of the Counsel 
of the Lmiversity of the City of New York. 

Judge Edward Patterson, of the Supreme Court, Appel- 
late Division, was born in New York City in 1839. He was 
educated in Philadelphia and at Williams and Hobart Colleges, 
in which institutions he received the degrees of LL.D. 

Judge Patterson was admitted to the Bar in i860 and was 
engaged in private practice until 1887 when he became Judge 
of the Supreme Court. He was later appointed to the Appellate 
Division by Governor Morton. 

Judge Patterson is a member of the IManhattan, Century, 
Players, Alpha Delta Phi, Democratic and Metropolitan Clubs, 
and the Uptown Association. 

He is also President of the Law Institute of New York. 



L 



THE COURT OF GENERAL SESSIONS. 



The Court of General Sessions of the Peace is a criminal 
court, with the same jurisdiction in criminal actions as the 
Supreme Court. The jurisdiction of this Court covers every 
felony except treason. The Court of General Sessions is bound 
to try any misdemeanor whenever any of its Judges certifies that 
it is reasonable such charge shall be prosecuted by indictment. 

The Grand Jury is the important branch of this Court, and a 
new Grand Jury is selected for each term of the Court, there 
being twelve terms a year. The law requires the Court of Gen- 
eral Sessions to begin a new term on the first Monday of each 
month, regardless of the fact that the Monday might fall upon a 
legal holiday. 

The Grand Jury must investigate every case and bring an 
indictment for the same before any criminal action brought 
before the Gourt can be prosecuted. 

The Grand Jun,- being the highest power in the County, has, 
under the Code, the power to inquire into the corrupt miscon- 
duct in office of any public official in the County. 

ivlore than 4,000 cases are disposed of every year in the Court 
of General Sessions. All of these are criminal cases, and it is said 
on good authority that this is the busiest Court in the world. 
Outside of the County, where the Court of General Sessions has 
no jurisdiction, the Supreme Court in this State does the work. 
In New York County four parts of the General Sessions and 
often one part of the Supreme Court are necessary to conduct 
the criminal cases. There are five Judges in the Court of Gen- 
eral Sessions, who rank in order of procedure as follows: 

Judge Rufus B. Cowing, who, after serving the City as an 
Alderman was elected for a term of fourteen years a City Judge 
in 1878 and still holds that title, has been chosen by his colleagues 
as Chief Justice of the Court of General Sessions. Judge Cow- 
ing was unanimously re-elected Judge of this Court in 1892, the 
length of his term being fourteen years. 

Judge James Fitzgerald, who has been in the public service 
for some years, began his career in the Assembly. He was after- 
ward elected State Senator and then became Assistant District 



269 



Attorney, in which capacity he displayed a fine ability and per- 
formed six years of effective work. In 1889 he was elected Judge 
of the Court of General Sessions for a term of fourteen years. 

Judge Joseph E.Newburger,w1io was also an Assemblyman 
before ser\-ing on the Bench, was for six years a City Court Judge 
previous to his election as Judge of the Court of General Sessions. 
He was elected a Judge of this Court in 1895. 

Judge M.\rtin T. McMahon, who was elected a Judge of the 
Court of General Sessions at the same time as Judge Newburger, 
has been prominently in public life ever since he returned from 
the army at the close of the war with the rank of IMajor-General. 
Among the offices he has filled (previous to his election to the 
Bench) in the State of New York are United States Marshal, 
State Senator and Receiver of Taxes. 

Recorder John W. Goff’s first public service was as Assist- 
ant District Attorney under the late Colonel John D. Fellows. 
During the investigation of the Police Department by the Lexow 
Committee he distinguished himself as the counsel for the com- 
mittee, and for this work attracted public attention to that extent 
that he was elected Recorder in the fall of 1894 for a term of 
fourteen years. 

Edward R. Carroll, Clerk, Court of General Sessions, was 
born in New York City thirty-one years ago. ]\Ir. Carroll’s first 
education was received in the public schools of this city, from 
which he entered Manhattan College, where he was graduated 
with honors. 

Upon leaving college he engaged in the railroad business, his 
last connection in this line being with the New York Central 
Railroad, where he filled the position as Chief Clerk in the 
Freight Department. He resigned the above position to accept 
the office of Clerk to the Court of Special Sessions, and later was 
connected with the Surrogate’s Office, which position he also 
resigned to enter into the building material business. 

Mr. Carroll has always taken an active interest in politics and 
has done good work for the Democratic Party as a member of 
Tammany Hall, in which organization he is popular and re- 
spected. He is a member of the Home, IMohican, Cannon and 
Saturday Night Clubs, and is looked upon in these organizations 
as a factor in the future of his party. 



COURT OF SPECIAL SESSIONS. 



The present Court of Special Sessions was called into being- 
on July I, 1895, under a Legislative Act comprising chapter 601 
of the Laws of 1895, and popularly known as the City Magis- 
trates’ Bill. L’nder the pre-existing regime three Police Justices 
were chosen from the then existing Board, to sit as trial judges 
in what was then known as the Court of Special Sessions. These 
justices alternated each month. When the City Magistrates’ 
Bill went into force, the present Court of Special Sessions was 
created as a separate and distinct tribunal. A necessary cpialifi- 
cation for appointment is made that each appointee shall have 
been a lawyer of at least ten years’ standing. Under the Charter 
the same Court was continued, but the name was changed to the 
Court of Special Sessions of the First Division of The City of 
New York, a similar Court, known as the Court of Special Ses- 
sions of the Second Division, having been created under the 
Charter for the remaining boroughs of Greater New York. 

There are five Justices of the Court of Special Sessions of the 
First Division, namely, Elizur B. Hinsdale, Y'illiam Travers Je- 
rome, Ephraim A. Jacob, John Hayes and William C. Holbrook. 
Justice Hinsdale was appointed for ten years. Justice Jerome for 
eight years. Justice Jacob for six years, Justice Hayes for four 
years, and Justice Holbrook for two years. Upon the expiration 
of Justice Holbrook’s term in July, 1897, he was re-appointed 
by Mayor Strong for ten years. Under the act above specified 
the Justices, upon the expiration of the terms of the present 
Justices, will be appointed for ten years each, one Justice going 
out of office every two years. The salaries of the Justices were 
fixed by the Legislature at $9,000 per year each. 

The Court of Special Sessions is essentially a Trial Court for 
all classes of misdemeanors. It has also exclusive jurisdiction in 
bastardy proceedings. Three Justices constitute the Bench, one 
Justice presiding on each alternate month. A majority vote 
counts as a verdict of the Court. Nearlv 30,000 cases have been 
presented to the Court for trial since its inception in July, 1895. 
Included in the list of misdemeanors coming before the Court 
are violations of the Liquor Tax Law, Crueltv to Animals, all 
crimes in which children are involved, disorderlv house cases. 




271 



food adulterations, petit larceny, assaults in the third degree, 
violations of Trade Mark, Medical, Pharmacy, Plumbing and 
other similar laws. The Court has collected in fines and turned 
over to the City Treasury about $150,000. All persons charged 
with misdemeanors were, under the Legislative Act, given the 
privilege of a trial by jury under certain conditions. It was 
necessary for one so charged to sign a statement setting forth 
his innocence, and to swear to the same before a Justice of the 
Supreme Court or a Judge of General Sessions. It then became 
mandatory upon such Judge to order the case to be presented to 
the Grand jury for indictment. The Charter changed this by 
making" it discretionary with the Judges of the higher Courts as 
to whether the case should be presented to the Grand Jury or 
not. 

Attached to the Court are a Clerk, Deputy Clerk, Assistant 
Clerk, Court Stenographer, Interpreter, Stenographer, Messen- 
ger and seven Subpeena Clerks. The salary of the Clerk is 
$4,000 and of the Deputy Clerk, $3,000. The Clerk, Mr. William 
M. Fuller, was appointed in March, 1896, succeeding Theodore 
McDonald, resigned. He was appointed Deputy Clerk at the 
inception of the Court. Prior to that he was engaged in repor- 
torial work on the staff of the New York “ Herald ” for eight 
years. Mr. Fuller -was one of the founders of the Jersey City 
“ News,” and was engaged for several years in mining and other 
business ventures in the west. He is a son of the late W. J. A. 
Fuller, of the law firm of Abbett & Fuller, and had a legal train- 
ing in the office of that firm. The Deputy Clerk, Mr. Joseph H. 
Jones, was Managing Clerk of the Law Department of the Long 
Island Railroad for many years, and was appointed in March, 
1896, to succeed Mr. Fuller as Deputy Clerk. 

Justice Elizur P. Hinsdale, of the Court of Special Ses- 
sions, was born in 1831. He received a common school educa- 
tion at a local academy, followed by the study of law and his 
admission to the Bar in Buffalo in 1856. 

During the campaign of President Lincoln in i860 he was 
Chairman of the Genesee County Republican Central Committee. 
In 1861 he moved to New York and immediately attained a suc- 
cessful practice. 

In 1885 he was appointed by Mayor Strong Judge of the Court 
of Special Sessions, and made Presiding Justice of the Court, in 
recognition of his ability as an organizer. 



2/2 

Judge WiLuiAii Travers Jerome, of the Court of Special 
Sessions, was born in New York City in 1859. He was educated 
by tutors and entered Amherst College, where, after his gradua- 
tion, he attended Columbia College Law School. He was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1884, and practiced law until 1888, in rvhich 
year he was appointed Assistant District Attorney and continued 
to act in this capacity for three years. In 1890 Judge Jerome 
resumed the practice of law and continued so successfully for 
five years. During that period he acted as counsel and was 
associated prominently in a number of famous cases, among them 
being the Carlyle Harris murder case, in which he appeared for 
the defendant, and the Lexow Investigation, with which he was 
connected as an Assistant Counsel to Recorder Goff. 

Judge Jerome is a member of the Union, Heights, Manhat- 
tan, Chess and Citv Clubs, and the Bar Association of New 
York. 

Judge Ephraim A. Jacob, of the Court of Special Sessions, 
was born in Philadelphia in 1845. He was graduated in the 
Class of ’64, College of the City of New York, and the Class of 
'66, Columbia College Law School. He was admitted to the 
Bar in June, 1866, and has practiced law up to the time of his 
appointment to the Special Sessions Bench two years ago. 

Judge Jacob is the author of a number of legal works, among 
others, “Fisher’s Digest of the English Common Law,” in ii 
volumes, of which many editions were printed. 

Judge John Hayes, of the Court of Special Sessions, was 
born in New York City in March, 1838. He attended private 
and public schools in this city, took up the study of law before 
he reached his majority, and was admitted to the Bar in his 
twenty-first year. 

Up to the time of his appointment to the Special Sessions 
bench. Judge Hayes had practiced law successfully for thirty-five 
vears, his career having been such that when his name was men- 
tioned as Judge of^the Court of Special Sessions he received the 
indorsement of the entire City Judiciary for the place. 

Judge Hayes, who has never been prominent in official life 
until recently, has, nevertheless, served the City as a School 
Commissioner and the State as a member of the Legislatufe, 
1872. In both of these capacities he displayed the same in- 
terest, clear-sightedness and good judgment that he has shown 
during his first year upon the Bench. 



274 



Judge William C. Holbrook, of the Court of Special 
Sessions, was born in Battleboro, Vermont, in 1842. He was 
educated at tlie public schools and a private academy in his native 
State, and later entered Harvard Law School, from which he 
was graduared. 

From 1861 to 1865 Judge Holbrook served his country as 
Lieutenant and Adjutant of the Fourth Vermont Volunteers, 
Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and as iMajor and Colonel 
Seventh \’ermont Volunteers, in the Department of the Gulf. 
He afterward commanded for one year the District of West 
Florida, and also served as Brigade Commander in the Thirteenth 
and Nineteenth Army Corps. 

While in the Army Judge Holbrook participated in numerous 
engagements, and was twice brevetted for gallantry and efficient 
service. 

In 1866 he was admitted to the Bar and practiced law in New 
York City until appointed Justice of Special Sessions in July, 
1895. 

Judge Holbrook is a member of the Bar Association, Army 
and Navy Club, Loyal Legion, Grand Army of the Republic, and 
the New England Society. 






JUDGES OF THE CITY COURT. 

Judge John H. McCarthy, of the City Court, was born in 
New York City in 1849. He was educated at the public schools 
and the Christian Brothers Academy, and after his graduation 
entered upon the study of law. He finished his course of study 
in the office of Judge Me Adam, and was admitted to the Bar in 
1873. He at once engaged in active practice, and continued at 
his profession until 1878, in which year he was elected to the 
Assembly. He was re-elected in 1880 and in 1881 was elected 
a Civil Justice. In 1890 he was elected a Member of Congress 
by a large plurality, and while serving in the national legislature 
made a fine record for his course upon all measures aflecting the 
interests of the people. 

In January, 1891, Governor Hill appointed him Justice of the 
City Court to succeed Judge Me Adam. In the fall of 1897 he 
was re-elected to the same position for a term of six years. 

Judge Edward F. O’Dwyer was born in New York in i860. 
He was educated in the public schools and by private tutors. He 
was admitted to the Bar in 1881- — upon reaching his majority — 
and at once entered upon the general practice of law. 

In 1882 Judge O’Dwyer became counsel for the members of 
the Brooklyn Fire Department, and in the course of several years 
obtained nearly one hundred restorations of illegally removed 
firemen. 

In 1884 he was elected to the Board of Aldermen from the old 
Twenty-first Assembly District, and served during 1885 as 
Chairman of the Faw Committee. In 1893 he successfully de- 
fended the Aldermen, Supervisors and County officers of Kings 
County, of Brooklyn and Kings County, upon charges growing 
out of the alleged Columbian frauds. He was elected to the 
City Court Bench in 1895 to succeed the late Chief Justice 
Ehrlich. In 1897 he was re-elected for a full term of ten years 
to the same office. 

Judge O’Dwyer has been Vice-President of the Democratic 
Club for the past seven years, and has now received the nomina- 
tion for the same office next year. 

Judge John P. Schuchman was born in Germany in 1851, 
graduated from the Real-Gymnasium and Technical High School 



276 



at Darmstadt (Hesse) in 1868, and in same year came to New 
York, where his family then resided since 1848. He at once en- 
tered upon the study of law and in 1873 admitted to the Bar 
on a successful examination before the Supreme Court, where- 
upon he started to practice law on his own account and continued 
to do so until 1895, during which time he enjoyed a very lucra- 
tive and successful practice. In 1895 he was elected a City 
Court Justice for a term of six years. 

In politics he steadily was an active and stanch Democrat; 
was a Presidential Elector in 1888, and a member of the Tene- 
ment House Commission appointed by the Governor in 1894. 

\V. M. K. Olcott, Judge of the City Court, was born in this 
city in 1862. He was educated at Grammar School No. 35 and 
was graduated from the College of the City of New York in 
1881 and from Columbia College Law School in 1883. He was 
admitted to the Bar in 1883, and practiced law with his brother, 
J. Van Vechten Olcott, under the firm name of Olcott & Olcott, 
until December 15, 1896, when he was appointed by Governor 
Morton to be District Attorney of New York County, which 
appointment he held until January i, 1898. He was appointed 
by Governor Black to be Justice of the City Court of New York 
in the place of Justice Robert A. Van Wyck, resigned, which 
office he still fills. Mr. Olcott has always been a Republican in 
politics, and during 1895 ^^d 1896 he represented the Twenty- 
first Assembly District in the Board of Aldermen. He was 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, and, as such, a member of 
the Sinking Fund Commission of The City of New York. 

Thomas F. Smith, Clerk of the City Court, was born in New 
York City on July 24, 1865. He attended the public schools 
and St. Francis Xavier’s and Manhattan Colleges, and was subse- 
quently employed by the Western Union Telegraph Company as 
Clerk and promoted to operator and manager. Later he became 
a newspaper reporter, working on the “ World,” “ Journal,” and 
“ Tribune ” at various times and for the United Press up to its 
dissolution. Fie was appointed Stenographer to the Building 
Department in 1892, and two years later promoted to the sten- 
ographership of the Eighth District Court, which he held until 
April, 1898, when he was made Chief Clerk of the City Court of 
New York City. 

When John C. Sheehan succeeded Richard Croker as leader 
of Tammany Hall in 1895, he selected Mr. Smith as his private 



278 



secretary. In 1898, when Mr. Croker resumed the leadership of 
that organization, he also appointed Mr. Smith his private sec- 
retary, subsequently making him Secretary of the Tammany 
Society, Tammany General Committee and the Executive Com- 
mittee of Tammany Hall, he being the youngest man to ever 
hold any of these important positions. 

Mr. Smith was one of the founders and the first President of 
the famous Tenderloin Club, which was organized some years 
ago by newspaper men. He is a Trustee of the New York Press 
Club and a member of the following organizations : Demo- 

cratic Club, Pequod Club, State Stenographers’ Association, Tel- 
egraphers’ Club, Excelsior Council, C. B. L., and Knickerbocker 
Council, Knights of Columbus. 





SURROGATES^ COURT, 



The Surrogates’ Court in its present form was established in 
1787, when an act was passed which took away from the then 
Court of Probate the granting of probate and letters of adminis- 
tration and transferring these rights to the Surrogates of each 
county. 

The Surrogates are now vested with the same power as 
Judges of Probate — to cite the Administrators of Accounts, to 
decree distribution or the payment of bequests and legacies and 
to compel it by execution. 

All of the wealth that is transferred by will, and the disposal 
of property and money of those who die intestate, practically 
passes through the Surrogates’ Office. When it is said that 
millions of dollars’ worth of property — real and personal — are 
adjudicated in the Surrogates’ Court of this county every year, 
an idea of the importance of this office as a protector of widows 
and orphans and a defender of their rights can be imagined. ■ 

No like Court in this country disposes of anything near the 
amount of business that is transacted in the Court presided over 
by Surrogates Frank T. Fitzgerald and John H. V. Arnold. 

The present force in the Surrogates’ Office now numbers 
seventy persons. Next in rank to the Surrogates are Chief 
Clerk William V. Leary, who is also Chief Law Assistant, and 
J. Fairfax McLaughlin, who is Clerk of the Court. Both of 
these gentlemen have been connected with the Court for many 
vears, and in addition to their knowledge and training possess 
the special legal and executive ability which the peculiar and 
intricate duties of their positions demand. Associated with them 
are Edward W. Bonynge, who is Deputy Chief Clerk, Mhlliam 
Rav De Lano. First Law Assistant, and John A. O’Brien, Sec- 
ond Law Assistant. 

Surrogate John H. Ah Arnold was born in 1839. He was 
admitted to the Bar in i860, and in the practice of his profession 
soon gained distinction as a man possessing a wide knowledge 
of the law and a devotion to the same which — with his large ex- 
perience — has given him a high standing and an unique place 
before the Bench and Bar of the United States. 



28o 



In 1888 ^vlr. Arnold was elected President of the Board of 
Aldermen, to succeed President Foster, and in this position dis- 
played the same fine ability that characterized his private prac- 
tice. 

In the fall of 1893, when Surrogate Ransom’s term expired, 
he was elected to succeed him, and since that time has performed, 
with Surrogate Fitzgerald, the judicial duties of that Court. 

Aside from his official career Judge Arnold has devoted much 
of his leisure time to literature, politics and social affairs. He 
is considered one of the best posted men on criminal law in the 
country, and his collections of books and autographs on this and 
other subjects is one of the most valuable in the English speaking 
world. His political and social career has been equally active and 
in addition to having been for years President of the Democratic 
Club, he was one of the first members of the Players’ Club, and 
has been a member of the New York Athletic Club since 1868. 

Surrogate Frank T. Fitzgerald was born thirty-nine years 
ago in the old First Ward of this city. He was educated in St. 
Francis Xavier’s College, in New York, and in St. Mary’s Col- 
lege, Niagara Falls. In 1878 he was graduated from Columbia 
College Law School, and finished his legal studies in the offices 
of Smith M. Weed and the late General Husted. 

He at once obtained a successful practice, and at the same 
time took an active interest in political affairs. In 1888 he was 
elected to represent the Sixth Congressional District in Congress, 
and before his term had expired was elected County Register. 
In 1892, when Rastus B. Ransom was the only Surrogate, the 
Legislature passed a bill providing for another, and in the election 
of that year Mr. Fitzgerald was chosen by the people as the first 
Surrogate to fill a term of fourteen years. 



JUDGES OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Joseph H. Stiner, Judge of the Municipal Court, Eighth 
District, was born in this city fifty-nine years ago. 

At eighteen years of age he became a member of the repor- 
torial staff of the New York Sun, and contributed to that paper 
such unique and brilliant matter that he was requested to take 
and accepted a place on the Leader, under John Clancy. 

He remained with the above paper for two years, at the end 
of which he took up the study of law. He was graduated at the 
New York University, and after his admission to the Bar prac- 
tised law with success until the Civil War broke out, when he 
joined the Fifty-ninth New York Volunteers and went to the 
front. He was made a Major in'the above regiment for gallant 
and efficient service and since the close of hostilities has been 
further recognized by an appointment as Colonel of the Hebrew 
Union Veteran Association. He is also a member of Phil. 
Kearney Post, G. A. R. 

In 1893 Mr. Stiner was elected Justice of the Eighth District 
Court, and since then he has tried many important cases, in all 
of which he has shown a fine knowledge of the law and a splendid 
judgment in administering the same. 

He is at present the President of the Board of Municipal 
Justices. 

Judge Stiner is a prominent member of Tammany Hall and 
has charge of the Press Department of the organization. He is 
a member of the Progress, Pequod, New York Press, Democratic 
and Masonic Clubs. 

Hermann Bolte, Justice of the Second 
District Court, was born in Hoexter, Ger- 
many. 

His father was a brewer and a prominent 
citizen; President of the Board of Council, 
and Mayor of the City for several years. 
Judge Bolte came to New York in 1853, at 
the age of ten years. 

He attended the William Street Public 
School, and after completing the course of 
instruction there entered the office of Banker 
Bischoff, where he continued until 1861, when he commenced the 
importing business on Broadway, in which he was very success- 
ful. 




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282 



In 1869 he withdrew from commercial pursuits and entered 
Columbia College Law School, graduating therefrom in 1874. 
After graduating, Judge Bolte went to the University of Heidel- 
berg, Germany, wdiere he pursued a course of studies in the Civil 
Law for one year; returning to New' York in 1875, entered 
upon the practice of the law, adopting real estate and matters in 
the Surrogates’ Courts as a specialty. 

He has the management, as executor and counsel, of about 
forty estates. 

In 1893 he was elected Justice of the Second District Court, 
and it is worthy to be noted that out of a registration of over 
12,800 voters he received the largest majority of votes, namely, 
10,975, ever cast in the District. 

During the three years of his service on the Bench, out of 
about 250 appeals taken to the Appellate Court, only 5 reversals 
have been made in matters of which his Court has jurisdiction. 

The Astor House Clam Case, wdiich attracted wide attention, 
was tried before him, and, upon appeal, the Court above unani- 
mously sustained him. 

Throughout his entire course Judge Bolte has showm much 
ability in the discharge of his judicial duties, and has proven an 
impartial and painstaking officer, and deservedly enjoys the es- 
teem of the members of the Bar, for his decisions are based upon 
justice and a clear conception of the law. 

Judge Bolte is a man of high aims and ideas, and his entire 
course, both in public and private life, has been a logical and 
consistent one. Throughout his w'hole official career he has 
never permitted anything, save a sane judgment and a fine sense 
of justice, to influence any of his acts and decisions. 

Ji'Dr.]: George F. Roesch w'as born of 
German parentage in this city on June 19, 
1855, and was educated in St. Nicholas 
Parochial School, De La Salle Institute of 
the Christian Brothers and Columbia Law 
L'niversity. He also read law' in the offices 
of Cyrus Lawton and Barnum & Rebham, 
and was admitted to the Bar on October 30, 
1876. He has always been a Tammany 
Democrat, and has been a speaker for his 
party, in both the English and German lan- 
guages since 1874. He had delivered his first political speech 




283 



before he was seventeen years of age, at Jef¥erson Hall, in Bank, 
near Bleecker street, in this city, before an organization of work- 
ingmen. He is a member of the Democratic Club, New York 
Press Club, State Bar Association, Catholic Club, Knights of 
Columbus, Knickerbocker Athletic Club, Catholic Benevolent 
Legion, Director of the German Poliklinik, Gesellig Wissen- 
schaftlicher Verein, Taxpayers’ Association, Tenth and Eleventh 
Y’ards, Beethoven Maennerchor, and several other German or- 
ganizations. 

He was a Member of Assembly in 1863, 1885, 1888 and 
1889, and a Senator from 1890 to 1894. He was Chairman of the 
Senate Judiciary Committee in 1892 and 1893. 

During his legislative career he was identified with much 
important legislation. Among many others, he secured the 
passage of the bills repealing the law which had prohibited ac- 
tions being brought in this State to collect life insurance policies 
in cases in which the insured died outside of the State; to compel 
corporations to pay their employees weekly in cash; protect 
trades-union labels by injunction and action for damages; abolish 
maximum periods of punishment and give Judges of Criminal 
Courts a larger discretion in the imposition of sentences, and to 
permit the mother of a child to dispose of its custody equally with 
the father. 

Since his accession to the Bench he has utilized his spare 
moments in rounding out his legal education. 

During the winter of 1894 he attended the special lectures 
in the New York Law on international, patent and admiralty law, 
by Professors Phelps, Lee and Goodrich; pleading and evidence, 
and actions and assignments, by Professors Chase and Hughes. 

He has also entered the lecture field and delivered an address 
on Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence before the College of Phar- 
macy, which now forms chapter 42 of the recent work of Dr. 
Justin Heroic! on legal medicine for the use of physicians and 
lawyers. 

Judge Wauhope Lynn was born in Ireland in 1856. He 
attended the common schools in his native land for four years, 
and after his arrival in New York spent one year in the public 
schools here. 

After leaving school he learned the trade of a mechanic and 
studied law while supporting himself at his trade. In 1880 and 
1881 he acted as clerk in a law office, and later entered New York 



University Law School, from which he was graduated. He was 
admitted to the Bar in 1882 and in the same year was appointed 
Docket Clerk in the County Clerk’s Office. In 1891 and 1892 
he was Assistant District Attorney, and later in the latter year 
was appointed, by Governor Flower, Judge of the First District 
Court of New York, which office he has been elected to twice 
since. 

Judge Lynn is a forcible speaker and lecturer, and has done 
good service in this direction, both for his party and the Irish 
Land League, to which cause he has devoted much of his time. 

Judge William F. Moore, of the Third District Municipal 
Court, was born in Newburg, New York, August 29, 1855. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native city and also 
attended the Newburg Academy, in which institution he acquired 
an education in the higher branches and also a foundation 
for the study of law, which he read in the office of Fullerton, 
Knox & Crosby. 

Judge Moore was admitted to the Bar in 1880 and at once 
built up a large and successful practice, consisting of some of the 
most important litigation brought before the City and State 
Courts. 

In June, 1890, he was appointed by Governor Hill to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Judge Dean, and in the fall of 
that year, although there were two other candidates in the field, 
and one of them of the same political faith as Judge Moore, he 
was nevertheless elected by a plurality of 2,000, being the first 
Democrat elected from his district to the Bench. As a further 
evidence of his standing and popularity in 1893 he received the 
united Democratic nomination of his party for the same office to 
which he was elected for a term of six years. 

Judge Moore is a member of the Tammany Society and is 
Chairman of the General Committee of that organization in the 
Fifth District. He is also President of the Iroquois Club, and a 
member of the Democratic and New York Athletic Clubs. 



285 



James A. O'Gorman, Justice of the 
iNIunicipal Court, Tenth District, was born 
New York City in i860. He was educated 
in the public schools and the College of The 
City of New York, from which he was 
graduated in 1882. He was admitted the 
same year to the Bar and attained a suc- 
cessful practice. 

He was elected a few years ago to the 
Bench, and since his incumbency has dis- 
played the same ability which marked his 
success in private life. 

He is a member of the Catholic Club and the Tammany So- 
ciety, and is popular in both organizations. 



Judge Henry M. Goldfogle was born 
in this city in 1856. His education, up to 
the time he took up the study of law, was 
largely received at his own hands. Judge 
Goldfogle’s school-house life was as short in 
his early days as were his financial resources. 
In spite of his limited means, however, he 
supported his aged mother and a helpless 
brother while studying law and attending 
college, from which he was graduated at the 
head of his class. Upon attaining his ma- 
jority he was admitted to the Bar, and at the age of twenty-three 
had already established a fine reputation for ability and courage 
by winning an important suit involving a quarter of a million 
dollars in property. 

In 1887 he was elected Justice of the Fifth District Court, and 
his record was so satisfactory that he was re-elected in 1893 for 
another term. He is now one of the Justices of the Municipal 
Court. 

Judge Goldfogle’s decisions have always been so just and 
sound that in the many thousands of cases he has disposed of 
only in two instances have his decisions been set aside by the 
Appellate Division of the Supreme Court. 

Judge Goldfogle has always taken an active interest in poli- 
tics, and while he is a sincere and consistent Democrat, has never 
held any public office other than the one he now fills. 

He has, on several occasions, however, been tendered the 





L. 



286 



nominations for Assembly and Congress, both of which he de- 
clined. He has, nevertheless, been conspicuous in the councils 
of his party, and in addition to being a delegate to every Demo- 
cratic State Convention since 1877, '''^s a delegate to the last two 
National Conventions. 

Judge Goldfogle is a member of the Empire City Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons; Equitable Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; Liberty Lodge, Knights of Pythias; Manhattan 
Lodge, Free Sons of Israel; Americus Lodge of the Sons of Ben- 
jamin; and of the Democratic Club; the Progress Club; Jeffer- 
son Club of the Sixteenth Assembly District; Columbian Club; 
New York Club; and he is President of the Seminole Club, as 
well as of a number of other social organizations. He is also the 
counsel for some of the permanent fraternal bodies and for several 
labor organizations. 

Daniel F. Martin, Justice of the Municipal Court, Sixth 
District, was born in this city in 1865. He was educated in the 
parochial and public schools and later took a course in the Col- 
lege of The City of New York from which he was graduated. 

After graduation he taught school and while thus employed 
studied law. 

He was admitted to the Bar and became a Clerk in the 
United States District Attorney’s office, in which position he 
gained much practical experience in his profession, which has 
served him well in his subsequent career. 

In 1890 he was elected to the Assembly and during his term 
there introduced several important bills, among them being a 
measure making it a misdemeanor for the proprietors of news- 
papers to misrepresent their circulation. This bill created quite a 
discussion at the time, but he was nevertheless sustained by the 
better element of the press and public and these indorsements 
liave in a measure helped to call attention to his fitness for the 
Bench of the Municipal Court. 

John B. McKean, Justice of the Municipal Court, Seventh 
District, was born in Ireland fifty-five years ago. 

He was educated in the public schools of this city and was 
admitted to the Bar in 1864, having studied law while he was a 
Clerk in the Marine Court, which position he filled for sixteen 
vears. He resigned from the above place to take the office of 
Police Court Clerk, which he held until December, 1889. He 
was appointed by Governor Hill to the iMunicipal Court Bench, 
caused by the death of Judge Monell. 



CITY MAGISTRATES. 



CiTV Magistrate Clarence W. Meade 
was born in New York City in 1841. He 
attended the public schools in the city long- 
enough to acquire an education sufficient to 
equip himself for a business career, and then 
left to enter the dry goods business in 1856. 
In 1861 he engaged in the commission busi- 
ness, in which he remained for five years. 
In 1866 he was appointed an Assistant Ap- 
praiser and held that position for ten years 
when he again engaged in the commission 
business until 1880, which year he was appointed Port Warden 
by Governor Cornell. 

In 1890 he was made a Police Justice by Mayor Grant, and 
acted as such until 1897, when the Board of Police Justices were 
legislated out of office by the “ reform ” administration. In 
1897, however, he was reappointed in the same capacity as a 
City Magistrate, a special act having been passed — Magistrate 
Meade not being a lawyer — qualifying him for the place by 
reason of his past services and familiarity with the work. 

City Magistr.\te John O. Mott was born in Saratoga 
County sixty years ago. In the Fremont campaign he was 
elected District Attorney for that county, and during the war 
received the appointment ,of Paymaster in the Army. 

In 1890 he was appointed Assistant United States District 
Attorney and held that office for many years. 

City Magistrate Mott is a member of Lafayette Post, the 
G. A. R., and the Loyal Legion. 

City Magistr.a.te Joseph M. Deuel was born in Deerfield, 
N. Y., in 1846. He was graduated from the Whitestone Sem- 
inary there and later taught school to enable him to study law. 

After he was admitted to the Bar he went to Virginia, where 
he became Commonwealth Attorney for Elizabeth and Warwick 
Counties. 

In 1871 he became Secretary to Roscoe Conkling, and while 
serving in this capacity fulfilled the duties of Clerk to the United 




288 



States Senate Committee on the Revision of Laws. In 1874 he 
was appointed Assistant United States District Attorney, under 
Col. George Bliss, and in 1876 was made Deputy Clerk, United 
States Circuit Court. In 1880 he was appointed Clerk of the 
Circuit Court, and at the expiration of his term resumed the 
practice of law until his appointment as City Itlagistrate by 
Mayor Strong in 1895. 

City Magistrate Robert C. Cornell is about forty-five 
years of age. He was graduated from Columbia College in 1874 
and two years later from the Columbia College Law School. 
After his admission to the Bar, Magistrate Cornell at once took 
up the practice of law, in which he attained a successful and 
lucrative practice. Apart from his practice Magistrate Cornell 
has always taken a warm interest in the social condition of the 
masses, and a short time before his appointment on the bench 
was Chairman of the Committee on Mendicancy of the Charity 
Organization Society, in which office he displayed good judg- 
ment and a fine executive ability, which serves him well in his 
present position as a City Magistrate. 

City Magistrate Leroy B. Crane was 
born in Lowell, Mass., June 9, 1849. He 
was educated in the public schools and the 
Franklin Grammar School of his native city 
and came to New York in 1865. In 1870 he 
entered the law office of his brother, where 
he read and studied law for five years. 

He was admitted to the Bar in 1880, and 
has continued in active practice since up to 
the time of his appointment as a City Magis- 
trate. In 1882-1883 Magistrate Crane was 
a member of the Legislature, and, as such, was identified promi- 
nently with much of the important legislation passed during 
those sessions. Among these measures were the " Five Cent 
Fare Bill ” and the law providing for new parks in the Bronx 
District. 

In 1885 he was appointed, by the Supreme Court, one of the 
New York Cable Railway Commissioners, and two years later 
was appointed City Magistrate by Mayor Strong. i\Ir. Crane is 
a member of the Republican Club, Mount }»Iorris Republican 
Club and the Patricia Club. Although his political affiliations 
are all aggressively Republican, he has earned a good name in 




L. 



289 

all parties for the fair and square way he has fought for the suc- 
cess of his jrartv. 

City Magistrate Charles A. Flam- 
MER was born in New York City in 1845. 
He was educated in the public schools; later 
attended the Free Academy of the City, and 
after completing the course began the study 
of law. Entering the office of a well-known 
lawyer, where he gained much practical ex- 
perience, he read and studied law until his 
admission to the Bar in 1866. 

In 1872, after a varied and successful ex- 
perience in all branches of his profession, he 
was elected a member of the Legislature, where he was honored 
by having been made a member of the Judiciary Committee, 
which was composed at the time of Samuel J. Tilden, David B. 
Hill and himself. 

In 1873 Mayor Havemeyer appointed him a Police Justice, 
which position he held until 1881. In that year Magistrate 
Flammer resumed the practice of law, and continued so actively 
and successfully until 1895, in which year he was appointed a 
City Magistrate by Maj'or Strong. 

Magistrate Flammer was at one time a School Trustee of the 
Twenty-second Ward, and in this, as in other public positions he 
has held, gave his best efforts and time to the cause at hand. 

He has been a member of the Bar Association since 1872 and 
is also a member of the Liederkranz Society, Medico-Legal So- 
ciety, Adirondack, and the League Club. 

City Magistrate Henry A. Brann was born in Ireland in 
1847. He came to America with his parents in 1850, who, for a 
time, resided in Kingston, New York. 

Magistrate Brann removed to this city, and after taking a 
course in the public schools went to Suspension Bridge, N. Y., 
where he attended the Seminary of Our Lady of the Angels. 

From the above institution he entered St. Mary’s College, 
Wilmington, Delaware, from which place of learning Archbishop 
Corrigan and a number of other men distinguished in the clergy, 
law and literature were graduated. 

IMagistrate Brann completed his studies in St. Charles Col- 
lege, Ellicott, Md., from which college he entered the office of 




19 



290 



r' 



T. R. & T. L. Westbrook, of Kingston, N. Y., where he read law 
for a number of years. In 1869 he was admitted to the Bar in 
Albany, and from that time up to 1895 had been in active prac- 
tice. 

Magistrate Brann has been associated in the practice of law 
with Judge Callahan, the late Senator T. C. Ecclesing and John 
C. Tomlinson. 

In 1881, however, the partnership with the latter gentleman 
was dissolved, and from that time up to his appointment as a 
City Magistrate in 1895, practiced law alone. 

During the above years he acquired a successful practice and 
a reputation as a practitioner for fairness to opponents and a 
loyalty to his clients, which made his appointment on the Bench 
a deservedly popular one. 

Magistrate Brann is a member of the Catholic, Democratic 
and Sagamore Clubs, the Bar Association of New York, Tam- 
many Society and the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. 

City Magistrate Willard H. Olmstead was born in 
Connecticut about forty years ago. At an early age he removed 
to Auburn, N. Y., where he received his first education, studied 
law, was admitted to the Bar. 

For a number of years he was prominent, in one way and 
another, in public affairs of Auburn, having been City Clerk of 
that place, a leading member of the Auburn Volunteer Fire De- 
partment and an active worker there of the Republican party in 
local. State and National campaigns. Magistrate Olmstead came 
to New York in 1887, and for ten years — up to the time of his 
appointment on the Bench one year ago — was engaged in news- 
paper work, having served chiefly as a reporter on the Associated 
Press, “ Evening World ” and “ Sun.” For a number of years 
he was local political reporter on the latter newspaper, and in 
addition to this, wrote a series of sketches for the “ Sun,” which 
have been equal to the best that newspaper has printed in the line 
of humorous and faithful portrayal of character. 

In addition to the above, he has been a quiet worker for the 
Republican party in this city, and although decidedly a partisan, 
he has never permitted it to interfere with his official duties or 
prejudice his actions in any particular. 



291 



City Magistrate Thomas F. Went- 
worth was born in South Berwick, Maine, 
in 1845. He was educated in the Phillips 
Academy, in which institution he prepared 
for college. 

In 1868, after he was graduated with 
honors from Yale College, he attended 
Columbia College Law School, and after 
taking the full course there was admitted to 
the Bar in 1870. He practiced law contin- 
uously after his admission and soon acquired 
a line of clients which stamped him at once as a man capable of 
handling important law cases. Among the cases which helped to 
establish his reputation was the Levinson embezzlement case, in 
which Magistrate Wentworth, as counsel for the Manufacturers 
and Merchants’ Bank, was successful in winning. 

In July, 1895, Mayor Strong appointed him a City Magistrate, 
which position he holds at the present time. 

Magistrate Wentworth is a member of the Bar Association, 
University Club, the New England Society and a prominent 
member of the Republican Club, of which organization he was 
President in 1886. 

City Magistrate Herman C. Kudlich 
was born in i860. 

He attended the New York University 
and Columbia College and was admitted to 
the Bar in 1881. 

He at once entered into a professional 
life, and as a member of the firm of Kud- 
lich & Finck, established a successful and lu- 
crative practice. Their clientage consisted of 
a number of the largest and most important 
concerns in the city, among them being the 
Legal Aid Society, of which Magistrate Kudlich was counsel 
for some years previous to his appointment on the Bench. He 
was appointed a City Magistrate by Mayor Strong, in 1895, for 
a term of four years, and thus far his service in the above capacity 
has been up to the high standard which has made the body of 
which he is a member such an efficient one. 






292 



City Magistrate Charles E. Simms, 
Jr., was born in the City of New York in 
1861. He attended Public School No. 58, 
from which he graduated in 1877 and en- 
tered the College of the City of New York. 
He thereafter became a clerk in the law office 
of Roswell D. Hatch, Esq., of this city, and 
while with him attended the Law School of 
the University of the City of New York, from 
which he received the degree of LL. B. in 
1883, having received the prize for the best 
written examination, and honorable mention for the excellence 
of his oral examination, and in June of the same year was ad- 
mitted to the Bar. He practised law in this city until January i, 
1891, when he was appointed Assistant District Attorney by the 
Hon. De Lancey Nicoll. While Assistant District Attorney he 
prepared for trial and assisted in the trial of many important 
criminal cases, among them being the Ben Ali, or “ Jack the 
Ripper,” murder case; the Stephani-Reynolds murder case, and 
the Carlyle Harris murder case. 

On January 4, 1893, he was appointed a Police Justice, and 
served as such until July i, 1895, when the old Board of Police 
Justices was superseded by the Board of City Magistrates. Dur- 
ing the year ending July i, 1895, he had over twelve thousand 
prisoners brought before him. In June, 1895, he was appointed 
a City Magistrate, being the only man on the old Board identified 
with Tammany Hall who was reappointed. He is a member of 
Tammany Hall, and of the Democratic Club; also of the Morris 
and Country Cycle Clubs, the Indian Harbor Yacht Club, and is 
President of the Associated Cycle Clubs of The City of New 
York. 

City M.ygistrate Joseph Pool was born in Minerva, Ohio, 
in 1833. He comes from a distinguished Quaker ancestry, his 
grandfather being credited with valuable services to the American 
Army under George Washington during the Revolutionan.^ War. 

Mr. Pool was educated in the public schools of his native 
town, and studied law with Judge George W. Belden, who was 
United States District Attorney under President Pierce. 

Mr. Pool was admitted to the Bar when he was twenty-one 
years of age. In the year i860 he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, 
and practiced law until the outbreak of the Civil War, when he 




293 



enlisted under President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 Volunteers. 
He was appointed Second Lieutenant in the 67th Ohio Infantry, 
and assisted in organizing the regiment. Following this appoint- 
ment President Lincoln made him Assistant Quartermaster, with 
the rank of Captain in the U. S. Volunteer Service, and later, at 
the request of Secretary of War Stanton, President Lincoln ap- 
pointed him additional Paymaster in the U. S. Army, with the 
rank of Major. He was mustered out December i, 1865, with 
the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, 
for faithful services in the Army of the Republic.” 

In 1868 he removed to New York, and after a short period 
he was elected President of the American National Bank, in 
which capacity he served for two years. He then spent two 
years in Europe, and upon his return was elected President of the 
Manufacturers and Merchants’ Bank. In 1880 he bought the 
New York and West Shore Railroad under foreclosure, reorgan- 
ized it and was elected its first President. 

In 1897 he was appointed a City Magistrate by Mayor Strong 
for a term of ten years. 

Magistrate Pool is a Director in a number of financial insti- 
tutions and a prominent member of the Ohio Society, Loyal 
Legion and I.afayette Post, G. A. R. 




! 






CORONERS. 

ANTONIO ZUCCA. 

Antonio Zucca was born in the year 
1851 in Trieste, Austria. As his family was 
strongly in favor of the unity of Italy, and 
therefore opposed to the Austrian Govern- 
ment, decided to move to Italy and resided 
in Milan. Young Antonio, however, pre- 
ferred and decided to emigrate to America, 
making his residence New York, about 
thirty years ago. Although he embarked 
for this country provided with the best mer- 
chant’s recommendations for a position in 
New York, he had a pretty hard time at the beginning, but finally 
secured employment in the Hotel Brunswick, then one of the best 
hotels in the city. Through his energy and untiring efforts to 
succeed it was not long before he established the firm of Zucca 
Elrothers, introducing in this country most of the Italian products, 
such as oil, chestnuts, cheese, Chianti wine, etc., articles which 
are now very well known and are used in large quantities here. 

As soon as Mr. Zucca became naturalized as an American citi- 
zen he began to take a very active part in politics. While living 
in what is now called the First Assembly District, he was ap- 
pointed trustee of Public School No. 39, and served there for 
many years. He later went to reside uptown in the Twenty-third 
District; served in the General Committee of Tammany Hall and 
was also later a member of the Executive Committee. It was 
Mr. Zucca who organized the Italo-Democratic Union, com- 
posed of district clubs and associations, which labor in unison 
with Tammany Hall. As a result of his efforts the First, Second, 
Third, Sixth, Fourteenth, Thirty-second, Thirty-third and Thirty- 
fifth Assembly Districts, also the Boroughs of Queens, Kings 
and Richmond are well organized, and are exercising a great 
influence over the Italians in assisting them to obtain their 
naturalization papers as American citizens, with a voice in the 
government of their adopted country; it is actually supposed that 
through this agency the Italian vote will be found almost double 
in the next election. In the election of 1897. Tammany Hall 




295 



nominated him as a Coroner of the Borough of Manhattan, to 
which office he was elected. Although not a lawyer he gives evi- 
dence of good common sense, and certainly fills his office with 
honor to the party that elected him. In the horrifying case of 
the collapse of a building on One Hundred and Sixteenth street, 
where a great many vvorkingmen were killed, he most admirablv 
conducted the inquest in behalf of the sufferers of this calamity. 

Mr. Zucca’s career, however, is not exclusively in the political 
field. He was for a number of years President of the Fruit 
Dealers’ Association; also of the United Italian Societies, which 
includes 144 different societies of New York. Was Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Italian Chamber of Commerce, but on the death of its 
President, Cav. Baratoni, now acts as its President. Is a trustee 
of the Fruit Exchange and chairman of the Law Committee of 
that institution. 

It is also true that Mr. Zucca has been of service to other 
countries, as during the controversy of Venezuela with England, 
he so endeared himself to President Crespo, as a result of work 
performed in favor of Venezuela, that President Crespo pre- 
sented him with the cross of “ Cavalier ” of the Order of “ Liber- 
tador.” 

JACOB E. BAUSCH. 

J.ACOB E. Bausch, a member of the Board of Coroners, Bor- 
ough of Manhattan, was born at No. 63 Lewis street, this city, 
on the 5th of October, 1867. 

He attended Public School No. 22 at Stanton annd Sheriff 
streets, until at the age of thirteen he became engaged with a 
publishing house. He subsequently began an apprenticeship in 
a wood-carving shop where he learned his trade. Immediately 
upon becoming a journeyman he applied for admission into the 
Union of that trade and took an active part in its affairs. In 1887 
he was elected Secretary of the Union and two years later was 
elected its business agent. He held this position until 1896 when 
the Democratic party offered him the nomination for Coroner. 
He was for years the secretary of the New York Central Labor 
Union and was one of the most prominent advocates of labor 
known in this vicinity. In almost all gigantic strikes where arbi- 
tration was agreed upon, the name of Coroner Bausch will be 
found as having been one of the gentlemen selected to adjust the 
differences. His greatest achievement that brought him before the 
public was his agitation against imported decorations, which were 



296 



being brought here, causing idleness at home. He fearlessly 
aavocated home products and succeeded in keeping many con 
tracts for work in the city. When the returns were complete after 
the election of 1896 it was seen that he was defeated by about 
5,600 votes, although he led his ticket and received 8,000 votes 
more than did the Presidential candidate. His vote in that cam- 
paign was 137,000. In 1897 Tammany Hall once again sub- 
mitted his name to the nominating convention, and with his run- 
ning mates was triumphantly elected for a term of four years. 



JOHN SEAVER. 

John Seaver, Chairman of the Board of Coroners of Rich- 
mond Borough, was born on Staten Island at the old homestead 
near Richmond. After leaving school he learned the trade of 
a miller, at which he worked for six years. In 1874 Mr. Seaver 
engaged in the express business and continued in that line until 
January i, 1898. He was school trustee of the Eirst District of 
Southfield and Northfield six years, and chairman of the Board 
five years. In 1889 he was elected Highway Commissioner for 
the Town of Southfield, and held the office continuously until 
January i, 1898. During the entire term he was treasurer of 
the Board. 

It was largely through the efforts of Mr. Seaver that the 
people of Richmond and Southfield secured a five-cent fare from 
Richmond to St. George on the Midland Electric Railroad, with 
transfers over all the other branches. The company proposed to 
charge ten cents to St. George and not to give transfers over the 
Port Richmond branch, but Commissioner Seaver refused to 
consent to these terms and thereby secured a five-cent fare over 
the entire line. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

MUNICIPAL ART COMMISSION. 

The Charter provides for a Municipal Art Commission, com- 
posed as follows : 

The Mayor of the City of New York, ex officio. 

The President of the Metropolitan Musum of Art, ex officio. 

The President of the New York Public Library, ex officio. 

The President of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 
ex officio. 

One painter, one sculptor and one architect, all residents of 
the City of New York, and three other residents of said city, 
none of whom shall be a painter, sculptor or architect, or member 
of any other profession in the fine arts; All of the last six men- 
tioned shall be appointed by the Mayor from a list of not less 
than three times the number to be appointed, proposed by the 
Fine Arts Federation of New York. 

All works of art intended for the City of New York, whether 
by purchase, gift or loan, must be submitted to and approved 
by the Commission. No existing work of art in the possession 
of the City shall be removed, relocated or altered in any way, 
without the similar approval of the Commission. The Commis- 
sion, which serves without pay, now consists of Charles T. 
Barney, Henry E. Howland, S. P. Avery, John Le Forge, the 
painter, Daniel C. French, the well-known sculptor, and Charles 
F. McKim, the architect. 

The ex officio members of the Commission are, in addition to 
the Mayor, Henry G. Marquand, President of the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, John Bigelow, President of the Public Library 
(Astor, Lenox and Tilden foundations), and A. Augustus Healy, 
President of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. 

WILLIA^I H. MAXWELL, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

William H. Maxwell was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, 
in 1852. He is of Scotch origin, his father, John Maxwell, hav- 
ing been a Presbyterian clergyman. Mr. Maxwell was educated 



298 



at the local national schools in his native county, after which he 
read classics with his father, who, with the assistance of a neigh- 
boring clergyman, prepared him for college. 

In 1868 Mr. Maxwell entered Queens University, which insti- 
tution has three colleges, one in Belfast, one in Cork and a third 
in Galway. Mr. Maxwell’s course embraced the Colleges of Bel- 
fast and Galway, and while a student in these universities, en- 
tirely supported himself by taking prizes in Latin, Greek, French, 
Logic and Metaphysics. 

In 1872 he was graduated with honors and the degree of A.B., 
and was appointed Sub-Master in the Royal Academic Institute, 
the largest classical and preparatory school in Ireland. In 1874 
he obtained the degree of M.A. with honors by examination in 
the ancient classics. 

In that year Mr. Maxwell came to America and engaged in 
newspaper work, his last connection in this field being with the 
Brooklyn Times, of which he was Managing Editor. While fill- 
ing the above position he was selected by the Brooklyn Board of 
Education to deliver a course of lectures in connection with the 
evening schools. Elis services in this field attracted attention to 
his abilities, and finally led to his election in 1882 as Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools in Brooklyn. In 1887 he was elected 
Superintendent of the Brooklyn Schools, and after his term had 
expired was re-elected three times for terms of three years. In 
IMarch, 1898, he was elected City Superintendent of Schools for 
Greater New York. 

In addition to the valuable school service he has rendered, Mr. 
Maxwell is the author of a number of standard educational works. 
Among these works are “ Primary Lessons in English,” “ Intro- 
ductory Lessons in English Grammar ” and “Advanced Lessons 
in English Grammar.” 

Mr. Maxwell’s versatile educational work has given him a 
high standing in his chosen field, and he is looked upon as one of 
the most progressive and aggressive leaders of education in the 
United States. 



299 



■HORACE LOOMIS, 

CHIEF ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF SEWERS. 

Horace Loomis, Chief Engineer, De- 
partment of Sewers, and ex ofUcio member of 
the Examining Board of Plumbers, was 
born in Binghamton, N. Y., in 1840. He 
was educated at the Binghamton Academy 
and the State Normal School, in which latter 
institution he prepared himself for the higher 
branches of civil engineering and kindred 
studies. 

In September, 1862, he entered the Rens- 
selaer Institute, in Troy (at that time the 
only college of the kind in the country), from which he was grad- 
uated in 1865 with the degree of C. E., and immediately after took 
up an active professional career. For some years he was largely 
employed in railroad construction, and in New York, Pennsyl- 
vania and Connecticut was identified with the construction of the 
leading railroads in those States. 

In 1875 Loomis came to New York and became con- 
nected with the Department of Public Works, under General 
Porter, who was then Commissioner. As the Civil Engineer in 
the Department he made the first surveys for the New Croton 
Aqueduct, following up this work by further surveys along the 
Bronx river and the Housatonic river for the purpose of locating 
the source and means of an additional water supply for the city. 
Mr. Loomis remained in the Department of Public Works, 
Bureau of the Chief Engineer, Croton Aqueduct, until 1886, at 
which time he was placed in charge of the Bureau of Sewers and 
remained in charge thereof from that time to January, 1898, when 
the Department was abolished. There has been no better service 
in the same capacity rendered the City. 

For the past twelve years Mr. Loomis has been Chief En- 
gineer in the Department of Sewers, and the fact that all the 
powers that be and have been have recognized his fitness for the 
position without a suggestion or thought of disturbing him is evi- 
dence enough that he is in his right place. 

Mr. Loomis is a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers and the Engineers’ Club, and in both organizations is 
held in high standing and esteem. 




300 



THOMAS J. BYRNE, 

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF SEWERS, BOROUGH OF THE BRONX. 

Mr. Byrne was born in the old Town of 
Morrisania on December 28, 1856, and has 
resided all his life in what is now the Bor- 
ough of The Bronx. 

His father, Thomas Byrne, has been a 
resident of the same district for over fifty- 
five years. 

The Deputy Commissioner was educated 
in the public schools. After his graduation 
from school he learned the machinists’ trade, 
but gave up that employment to take a posi- 
tion with the Knickerbocker Ice Company. He resigned the 
latter position to go into the ice business for himself. 

He has always been a Tammany Hall Democrat, and in 1891 
was the Democratic candidate for Assembly in what was then 
the Twenty-ninth District. It was a bad year for Democrats 
and Mr. Byrne was defeated. He ran, however, several hundred 
votes ahead of his ticket. 

Since 1891, and up to the time of his appointment as Deputy 
Commissioner, ]\fr. Byrne has been engaged in the contracting 
business. 




FRANCIS J. WORCESTER. 

Fr.vncis j. Worcester, Judge, Municipal Court, Eleventh 
District, was born in New Hampshire in 1848, and was brought 
up on a farm, which had been in the possession of his ancestors 
for five generations. His grandfather had nine sons, among 
them being J. E. Worcester, the author of the well-known 
Worcester Dictionaries, and the late Judge S. T. Worcester, of 
Ohio. 

As a boy Mr. Worcester had a strong desire to obtain a col- 
lege education. The common schools of his native place afforded 
only eight or nine weeks’ “ schooling ” a year, but he so improved 
his time at home, under the instruction of his father, that when 
an uncle, in 1865, gave him $300 to assist him in his college 
course, he prepared himself in a little over a year at a country 
academy in a neighboring town to enter Harvard, which he did 




301 



in 1866. He was graduated with honors, having defrayed, by his 
own exertions, the greater part of his college expenses. 

After teaching school for several years in Massachusetts, he 
came to New York and took the law course at the Columbia 
College Law School, from which he graduated in 1875. He 
served as a clerk in a law office a few years, and in 1878 opened 
an office of his own, and since that time has been in the active 
practice of his profession, and has gathered around him a client- 
age and business creditable to any lawyer, and especially so to 
him, in view of the fact that when he came to New York he had 
almost no acquaintances or connections. He was elected Judge 
of the Municipal Court in the fall of 1897. 



CHARLES V. ADEE, 

CLERK, BOARD OF ESTIMATE AND APPORTIONMENT. 

Charles V. Adee was born in Columbia 
County, New York, in 1836. He is the son of 
an old and well-known Nev/ York dry goods 
merchant. At the age of twelve he removed 
to this city, where he was graduated from a 
public school and immediately began a busi- 
ness career. 

Early in the ’6o’s Mr. Adee entered the 
employ of the New York Exchange Com- 
pany in Wall street, where the site of the 
Custom-house now stands. In 1864 Mr. 
Adee established the Real Estate Exchange (which is now such 
a conspicuous and important headquarters for the leading real 
estate dealers in the city) at No. iii Broadway. 

Mr. Adee was also employed for a time by the American In- 
surance Company, but in 1873 was appointed in a clerical 
capacity in the Department of Taxes and Assessments. In 1874 
he was promoted to the position of a Deputy Tax Commissioner, 
but resigned the place in 1878 and was appointed Clerk to the 
Board of Estimate and Apportionment, which position he has 
held continuously for twenty years. 

Mr. Adee’s long experience in the above position has put him 
in closer touch with the scope and functions of the departments 
which make up the City Government than almost any official 





302 



now holding office. This experience, combined with a splendid 
memory and a never-failing courtesy, has made him a valuable 
and important official whom it is always a pleasure to meet. Mr. 
Adee is a Democrat, but never lets politics escape him until after 
dark. As such, however, he is a member of the Democratic, the 
Bedford Democratic and the Young Men’s Democratic Clubs. 

EDWARD J. CONNELL. 

Edward J. Connell, Auditor of the 
Borough of The Bronx, has lived all his 
life in New York City, and was educated 
at the College of St. Francis Xavier. 

His first business experience was with 
the old Metropolitan National Bank, of 
which institution he was Note Teller. 

In 1892 he was appointed Bank Exam- 
iner of the State of New York by the Hon. 
Charles M. Preston, then Superintendent of 
Banks, which position he held until 1897. 
In the summer of last year he was selected by former Comp- 
troller Fitch as one of the expert accountants to make an 
examination of the financial condition of the boroughs to be 
annexed under the Greater New York Charter, and was assigned 
to the Borough of Brooklyn. 

At the commencement of the present year he was appointed 
by the Hon. Bird S. Coler, Comptroller, and sworn in by Mayor 
Van Wyck as Auditor for the Borough of The Bronx. 

In politics Mr. Connell has always been a Democrat, and is 
now and has been for a long time a member of the Tammany Hall 
General Committee of the Thirty-fifth Assembly District. 

P. J. ANDREWS. 

P. J. Andrews, Chief Inspector of Light, Ventilation and 
Plumbing in the Department of Buildings and ex ofHcio member 
of the Examining Board of Plumbers, was born in Dublin. Ire- 
land, in 1858. He came to New York in 1864, and after taking 
a course at the De La Salle Institute, entered the plumbing busi- 
ness and continued at his trade until 1896. 

In the above year he was elected a member of the Assembly 
and serv^ed two terms as the representative of the Twenty-sixth 




303 



District. During his career in the Assembly he took an active , 
part in the proceedings and was identified with much of the labor 
legislation that was passed during those sessions. 

Mr. Andrews, who is one of the lieutenants of Sheriflf Dunn 
in the Twenty-sixth Assembly District, is a gentleman of engag- 
ing personality and good executive ability, and the success which 
he attained therefor, both in his trade and the political field can be 
easily accounted for. 

Mr. Andrews is a member of Tammany Hall and the Demo- 
cratic Club, and in both these organizations he is one of the pop- 
ular workers. 



JOSEPH P. FALLON. 

Judge Joseph P. Fali.on, of Municipal 
Court, Ninth District, was born in Ireland in 
1845. He came to American with his 
parents in 1849 settled in this city, where 
he has since lived. 

He was educated in the public schools, 
and after taking a course at the Christian 
Brothers Institute, took up the study of law. 
He was admitted to the Bar in 1866, and 
practised law successfully until 1887, when 
he was elected Judge of the Ninth District 
Court for a term of six years. 

In addition to the above. Judge Fallon was a School Trustee 
of the Twelfth Ward in 1873-1875, and in the latter year was 
elected a member of the Legislature and served the State in this 
capacity during the session of 1876. In both of the above posi- 
tions he displayed a fine ability, and this, added to his knowledge 
of public affairs and legal training, has given him a high standing 
in the position which he now fills. Judge Fallon is a member 
of Tammany Hall General Committee; of the Catholic, Harlem 
Democratic, Democratic and Sagamore Clubs. 




304 



ASSOCIATION OF CITY HALL REPORTERS. 

The Association of City Hall Reporters is no part of the 
municipal government, but the relation of its members to the 
affairs of the city gives it a sort of semi-official standing. It is 
through this association that the public at large is kept in touch 
and made acquainted with the acts of city officials. The mem- 
bership of the association is composed of the representatives of 
the metropolitan daily newspapers who are assigned to report 
matters of public interest in the city departments and also to 
write the news of politics. 

There are from twenty-five to thirty members in the associa- 
tion, and, collectively, they represent all the newspapers in the 
City of New York. The association is less than two years old, 
having been formed in December, 1896. The object of its 
organization was the mutual benefit of the members and a desire 
for united action on all matters affecting the rights and duties of 
the reporters detailed to the City Hall. Members of the associa- 
tion are not elected. As soon as a reporter is assigned by the 
editor of his newspaper to “ cover ” City Hall, or politics, or 
both, he is formally admitted to membership. When he ceases 
to remain at City Hall he relinquishes his connection with the 
organization. 

The officers of the association are elected annually. In July 
of the present year death robbed the organization of its President, 
Major John B. Hays, whose demise was sincerely regretted, not 
only by his colleagues but an unusually wide circle of friends in 
social and political circles. 

The Association of City Hall Reporters has a constitution 
and by-laws. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of 
every month, and special meetings when occasion requires. The 
officers are a President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer, 
and a Room Committee, appointed by the President, to regulate 
the use of the room in City Hall which is occupied by the mem- 
bers. There is also a list of honorary members, but those enti- 
tled to such designation are persons who, at some time, have been 
regular members. The list is, therefore, necessarily a limited 
one. 

The association is self-sustaining, expenses being met by 
assessments levied upon the members. 




20 



3o6 

GEORGE C. TRANTOR. 

George C. Trantor, Coroner of Richmond Borough, was 
born in Richmond County and educated in the public school of 
Port Richmond. After leaving school he learned the trade of a 
carpenter and in 1875 began business for himself as a contractor 
and builder. In 1876 he moved to Sanford, Florida, and for a 
number of years was prominently identified with the local gov- 
ernment of that place, and in 1877, when the city was incorpo- 
rated, he was elected the first City Marshal. 

In 1879, O’T- account of the death of his father, he returned to 
Staten Island and again engaged in the building business. In 
1882 he was elected Chief Engineer of the North Shore Fire De- 
partment. In 1892 he was elected Trustee of the Village of Port 
Richmond, and two years lated was re-elected for a second term. 
He was elected a member of the first Board of County Excise 
Commissioners, but refused to accept the office. In 1896 he was 
nominated for the Assembly, but withdrew from the ticket. In 
1898 he was elected Coroner of Richmond Borough. 



WILLIAM HANNAH. 

William H.\nnah, Deputy Clerk of the Court of General 
Sessions, was born in New York City in i860. He attended the 
public schools until he was old enough to strike out for himself, 
when he engaged in a mercantile business, at which he remained 
until 1892. 

In the above year he was appointed an Attendant in the Su- 
preme Court and discharged the duties of the same for four years. 
In 1896 he was appointed to the position which he now fills. 

Mr. Hannah is a member of Tammany Hall and the Demo- 
cratic Club, and in the Eleventh Ward, where he resides, is one 
of the popular Lieutenants of City Chamberlain Keenan. 



PUBLIC SPIRITED CITIZENS. 

RICHARD CROKER. 



There is a similarity in the lives of political leaders and actors 
in so far that they display only one side of themselves to the 
public. A great politician frequently masks many of those qual- 
ities which would most appeal to human nature, because they 
have no place in the cold-blooded struggle of political endeavor. 

Naturally, then, Mr. Croker is very much misunderstood by 
those not so fortunate as to know him well. Even those who 
have frequent political affairs to transact with him know him 
simply as a reserved, tactful and rather reticent man. But to his 
friends he is the opposite. Many of Mr. Croker’s intimates 
often have expressed the wish that his birth had taken place 
fifteen or twenty years earlier, for if it had, they believe that he 
would have been one of the great figures in our civil war. This 
is a frequent expression for them : “ Richard Croker possesses 

the material of which great generals are made.” That he is one 
of the greatest leaders of men of this period must be conceded 
even by those who are not politically friendly to him. 

Most persons who are in any way interested in Mr. Croker 
wonder at the secret of his long-continued and steadily increas- 
ing power. It is chiefly to explain this and to show Mr. Croker 
not as a political leader, but as an individual, that this is written. 
To begin with, Mr. Croker possesses force of character to a 
remarkable degree, and that, in itself, is indicative of the fact 
that he is a brave man. Indeed, those who have been long 
associated with him know that he is incapable of fear. His great 
determination makes him incapable of appreciating the word 
“ failure.” 

Probably the greatest and strongest characteristic possessed 
by Mr. Croker is his ability to judge men correctly and never to 
underestimate the strength of his enemies. I cannot imagine 
that Charles Dickens could have been a much closer observer 
of human nature, or rather of men, than the leader of the New 
York Democracy. 

Possessing the traits that I have indicated it may be readily 
concluded that Mr. Croker finds it easy to win men to him. But 
it also is just as important that he should hold them after having 



308 



won their confidence, and this he succeeds in doing because he 
is sympathetic and always intends to be just. There is some- 
thing in his very presence that indicates he is far from being an 
ordinary man, and this in itself compels respect. 

The writer has been in Mr. Croker’s company when he was 
surrounded by strangers. I have wondered why he attracted 
their attention, and often concluded that there was some one in 
the crowd who knew him and had informed the others of his 
identity; but it would be learned that no one knew who he was, 
but that he attracted attention simply owing to his striking per- 
sonality. 

Mr. Croker is a man who is always learning. He has had 
great opportunity during the past four years to acquire knowl- 
edge. Any one who would judge him as the same man he was 
a few years ago would be greatly mistaken. He has developed 
just as much in four years as a boy at college would during the 
same period. He broadens steadily and develops every week 
and month and year, for his mind is just as curious and absorbent 
as a young person’s. 

The writer had known Mr. Croker very well for several years, 
but an eight days’ voyage on the ocean with him gave a clearer 
insight to Mr. Croker’s character, and it will probably be as 
good a way as any other in showing Mr. Croker as a man to 
narrate some experiences with him on the trip. While they may 
seem trivial in a way, still it is these little things that are some- 
times the most important as indicating character. 

It was not long until Mr. Croker showed himself to be a 
many-sided man, and full of human interest. I was the only 
person among the passengers who was personally acquainted 
with Mr. Croker and we were together constantly. I had heard 
him talk only upon public questions and upon the branch of 
sport in which he is interested. I often wondered about his 
range of reading. While he has never been a bookworm, I dis- 
covered that he had been a very practical and methodical reader. 
He told me that with the exception of historical novels he had 
never read a romance in his life; that he considered it to be a 
great waste of time. 

Nearly all his reading had been confined to biographies of 
the great leaders of men of the different periods, beginning with 
early civilization. I found that he made it a rule to make a study 
of almost everything relating to Napoleon. That subject was of 
great fascination for him, although, in discussing Napoleon, I 



309 



saw that he was not an admirer of him. Mr. Croker seemed to 
be unable to forgive the great Emperor for having been defeated 
at Waterloo. I really think that the New York leader thinks 
that no man deserves sympathy who has made a failure in any 
important af¥air. He argued that Napoleon should have known 
when to stop. At that time Mr. Croker had just announced that 
he had retired permanently from political leadership, and I won- 
dered if he was not trying to benefit by Napoleon’s experience 
in avoiding a Waterloo. In concluding his discussion of Na- 
poleon he stated that no man ought to undertake anything in 
which he is not reasonably sure of succeeding. This goes to 
show also that Mr. Croker, while sometimes considered auda- 
cious, is an exceedingly prudent and conservative man. 

Mr. Croker has probably admired Parnell more than any 
other man of modern times. He has spent a great deal of time 
in Ireland in personally interviewing people who were well 
acquainted with the great Irish leader. It is very natural that 
Mr. Croker should take Parnell as the best type for him to study, 
because Parnell had to deal very much with the same class of 
people that Mr. Croker had to do early in his political leader- 
ship. Several Irish members of Parliament who know Mr. 
Croker have told me that in many ways he reminds them of 
Parnell. Parnell was a very quiet and uncommunicative man 
to all except his intimates, and he had become considerable of 
a political force before he ever attempted to make a speech. The 
first time he arose to speak in the houses of Parliament his 
effort was a most pitiable failure, but through sheer force of 
character he overcame this early embarrassment and, as the 
world knows, proved himself a most forcible debater. There is 
no doubt but that Mr. Croker possesses all that determination, 
and that he would, if necessary, be able to become a strong 
character in debate. 

What most interested me in Mr. Croker was that during the 
first day of the voyage he would pick out conspicuous men 
among the passengers and predict to me that they were such 
and such a kind of beings. For instance, the first person he 
selected was a dry, bloodless looking man with a shrewd 
Yankee face. The man discovered Mr. Croker’s identity, and 
he in turn was studying the Tammany chieftian. They sat at the 
same table, but it was plain to be seen that the man did not want 
to become acquainted with Mr. Croker. 

“ That man is a Reformer,” said Mr. Croker to me, ” and if 



310 



you watch him you will find before the voyage is over that he is 
a typical Reformer, and probably worships at Dr. Parkhurst’s 
church — provided he lives in New York.” 

Mr. Croker became a great favorite among the passengers 
within a few days, for he associated with them very freely. He 
had thrown off the reserve he maintains in politics. Even the 
Reformer, for such he proved to be, became interested in him, 
and one day at dinner managed to engage in the conversation in 
which Mr. Croker was interested. Finally something was said 
of the heat of the previous night, and complaint was made upon 
the custom of steamship companies in causing the port-holes to 
be screwed up after a fixed hour, so that the state-rooms become 
very stuffy. 

“ Oh, I know how to get around that,” spoke up the Re- 
former, “ I carry a monkey-wrench with me, and after I know 
that the steward is off watch, so that he cannot know it, I open 
the port-hole.” 

“ But don’t you fear that there might be a terrible storm 
during the night and the state-room might be flooded and even 
the safety of the ship threatened?” 

“ Oh, I am only looking out for my own comfort. I will 
take the chances on the other part,” responded the bloodless 
looking gentleman. 

“ Didn’t I tell you that he was a Reformer,” chuckled Mr. 
Croker in a whisper to me. “ Nobody but a Reformer would 
carry a monkey-wrench.” 

A day or two after, Mr. Croker and the Reformer were seen 
walking the deck together. The Reformer took a great fancy 
to Mr. Croker, and I heard him say : 

“ I always thought that you were a very bad man, because 
I had read so in the newspapers, but I will never believe any- 
thing bad I see published about you again. Although I may 
never be able to agree with you politically, I have watched you 
closely and nobody could come to any other conclusion than 
that you are a kind-hearted man.” 

Probably one of the reasons that caused this remark was 
Mr. Croker’s kindness to the second-class and steerage passen- 
gers. Nearly every morning after breakfast he would walk 
down into the steerage and say a pleasant word or two to some 
of the unfortunates, for there were many traveling in this uncom- 
fortable way who had seen better days. There were four chil- 
dren in a family in which Mr. Croker took great interest, and 



he would carry them fruit from his table. One day he took an 
orange, a pear, an apple and a banana to distribute to the chil- 
dren. With these in his hand he stood for a moment or so 
watching the faces of the children. Then he handed the fruit to 
them, and it was very plain to be observed that the one who had 
craved for the orange received it, and so with the banana, the ap- 
ple and the pear. I could not help thinking, “ There is the secret 
of Mr. Croker’s political success.” He was able to tell how to 
please each child. Undoubtedly each of them, as they stood look- 
ing at the fruit, was wondering which would get the orange, and 
the one who did not want it feared that it would be given. How 
easily this ability to read people could be applied to politics as 
he had just done to the children. If he had four offices, of 
which he had the filling, and four men had been selected for 
them, he knew just which office to give in a way that would 
please all four and make each one think that he had received the 
most preferable. 

I should say that Mr. Croker’s predictions as to the character 
of the passengers proved to be thoroughly correct in every in- 
stance. Almost as remarkable in its accuracy as the prediction 
of the Reformer, was made about one passenger who was stand- 
ing on a tender waiting to board the steamer at Cherbourg. Mr. 
Croker pointed him out to me. He was smooth shaven. 

“ That fellow is made up to look like an actor, but he isn’t,” 
said Mr. Croker. “ He has a deceitful face. I will bet that he 
will prove to be anything but a favorite during the voyage.” 

This turned out to be correct. Everybody in the smoking- 
room detested the man. He^thought that he knew more than 
anybody else and tried to give the impression that he was a lead- 
ing member of the theatrical profession. 

It is in his own home, however, that Mr. Croker shines with 
the most glory. There political subjects are tabooed, and a more 
hospitable host and kind-hearted father or more devoted husband 
cannot be well imagined. In Mrs. Croker he has a wife who 
possesses intellectual qualities as strong for a woman as he does 
for a man. Among his four boys he is a big boy himself. In 
many ways Mr. Croker is as guileless as a child, and can enter 
into the spirit of boyish pranks with as much enthusiasm as anv 
of his sons. If a person was to meet him in his own home and 
not know him as a great political leader, they would never pick 
him out as a resourceful tactician. 



Harry W. Walker. 



312 



NATHAN STRAUS. 

Nathan Straus, ex-President of the Health Board, was born 
in Ottenburg, Germany, forty-eight years ago. He came to 
America when he was five years old, with his father, Lazarus 
Straus, who settled in Talooton, Ga., where his son attended 
Collensworth Institute. 

When the war was over his father removed to New York 
where Nathan and his brother, Isidor, after attending a business 
college, entered the employ of their father, and soon became 
members of the firm under the name L. Straus & Sons. 

The success of the business was so great that father and sons 
gradually acquired other interests, and, until a few months ago, 
when the father died, were declared to be the finest trio of 
merchants in this country. 

Be that as it may, however, it is a fact that the Straus Brothers 
stand to-day as the finest examples of what successful business 
men and good citizens should be. 

Nathan Straus, by reason of his active interest in public 
affairs, is one of the best known men in New York. Public 
affairs to Mr. Straus means something more than an appointment 
to a public office. To a man of the stamp of Mr. Straus it means, 
has meant and will mean a human interest in anything he devotes 
his time to. 

Mr. Straus’s charitable enterprises show him to be a man 
who knows his fellow men and the best way to minister to them. 
In all of his practical charities he has shown to have too high a 
regard for the worthy poor to treat them as beggars. Whether 
it was the selling of coal, of milk or running a lodging-house, he 
has applied to these enterprises just enough of the business prin- 
ciple to allow his patrons to preserve their self-respect. 

It’s no trouble for a rich man to give money away. It’s both 
time and trouble to apply the methods of Mr. Straus to the cause 
of the poor. How many rich men, how many men situated as 
Mr. Straus is, would undertake these charities to make the profit 
out of them Mr. Straus does? 

Mr. Straus, although a very busy man of affairs, is a person 
of striking executive ability. He has trained those under him 
to perform their duties so intelligently that at a moment’s notice 
he can turn to any important detail of his various interests. He 
is a man of keen perception, believes in order, system and direct- 
ness, and this, added to an energy and aggressiveness that few 
men possess to such a degree, has contributed largely to his 
commercial supremacy and success. 



313 



JOHN F. CARROLL. 

One of the most prominent figures in the 
politics of Greater New York is John F. Car- 
roll, former Clerk of the Court of General 
Sessions and a Sachem of the Tammany 
Society. In the absence of Mr. Croker he 
aVrects the affairs of Tammany Hall, and it 
is admitted by every one conversant with the 
management of a great organization that no 
mistake was made in selecting him for a 
position of such vital importance. He is a 
politician by instinct and training, and in the 
trying and extensive field of political labor in which he is 
now engaged he has displayed wonderful tact and judg- 
ment. He is thoroughly conversant with the details of 
every Department of the City Government, and, in addition, 
his mind is well stored with information on general sub- 
jects gathered during a busy life. He is an adept in 
the art of hearing and amicably arranging the innumerable 
difficulties incidental to the management of a great or- 
ganization, and his decisions are as prompt as they are just. 
In his early youth Mr. Carroll entered the political field in the 
old Twentieth (now the Twenty-second) Assembly District, and 
has, therefore, although still a young man, had an experience of 
over a quarter of a century in practical politics. Brought up in 
a school of politics which has produced some of the ablest poli- 
ticians New York has ever known, he developed, at an early 
age, the qualities of which great leaders are made, and his present 
prominence as one of the triumvirate who control the govern- 
ment of the second city in the world is but the natural recogni- 
tion of his personal popularity and keen, sound political judg- 
ment. During his administration as Tammany Hall leader in 
his home district, he proved an able and brilliant campaigner 
and scored repeated victories where defeat had frequently been 
the rule. 

He has always been unswerving in his loyalty to Tammany 
Hall, and his proudest boast is that he never belonged to any 
other organization. In the critical campaign of 1897 he labored 
enthusiastically for the success of Tammany Hall, whose standard 
bearer. Judge Van Wyck. was his life-long personal and political 
friend. Mr. Croker, Mr. Carroll and ex-Mayor Grant conducted, 




314 



with consummate ability, the campaign which resulted in so over- 
whelming a victory for the Democracy of Greater New York. As 
executive member of the Twenty-ninth Assembly District, in 
which he resides, Mr. Carroll, at the call of his party, is prominent 
as the friend and adviser of Richard Croker, the leader of the 
organization. Mr. Croker recognizes the fact that Mr. Carroll is 
a shrewd, level-headed politician, whose intima'^e knowledge of 
public men and public affairs and rare skill in studying human 
character, render his services to the party with which he is allied 
invaluable. 

Mr. Carroll was first appointed to public office as Clerk to 
the Grand Jury, by Supreme Court Justice Frederick Smyth 
(then Recorder), in 1879. His abilities as displayed in this posi- 
tion brought the usual reward. He was appointed Clerk of the 
Seventh District Civil Court, and was subsequently promoted to 
the Clerkship of the Court of Special Sessions. In 1891 he was 
unanimously selected by the Judges for the responsible position 
of Clerk of the Court of General Sessions. This office he held 
conjointly with that of Clerk of the Criminal Branch of the Su- 
preme Court until the fall of 1898, when he resigned to become 
Chairman of the Finance Committee of Tammany Hall. 

Mr. Carroll’s private life is above reproach. He is devoted 
to his wife and children and finds his greatest pleasure in their 
society. He thoroughly enjoys social life, and is popular in the 
large circle of acquaintances in which he moves. He is a brainy 
man of business, and had his lot been cast in the commercial 
or financial world, he would undoubtedly have been as great a 
success as he has been in politics. He is a member of the New 
York Athletic, Catholic, Arkwright, Democratic, Home ' and 
other clubs.. 






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